History of Great Britain and Ireland

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Oliver and Boyd, 1868 - Great Britain - 517 pages
 

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Page 210 - From his cradle, He was a scholar, and a ripe, and good one; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty, and sour, to them that lov'd him not; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer.
Page 210 - And though he were unsatisfied in getting, (Which was a sin,) yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely: Ever witness for him Those twins of learning, that he rais'd in you, Ipswich, and Oxford!
Page 6 - SESSIONAL SCHOOL BOOKS. Etymological Guide. 2s. 6d. This is a collection, alphabetically arranged, of the principal roots, affixes, and prefixes, with their derivatives and compounds. Old Testament Biography, containing notices of the chief persons in Holy Scripture, in the form of Questions, with references to Scripture for the Answers. 6d. New Testament Biography, on the same Plan. 6d.
Page 15 - Professor of the Italian Language at Oxford. — " I have adopted your Grammar for the elementary instruction of students of Italian in the Taylor Institution, and find it admirably adapted to the purpose, as well for the order and clearness of the rules, as for the practical excellence and ability of the exercises with which you have enriched it.
Page 57 - Live you ? or are you aught That man may question ? You seem to understand me, By each at once her choppy finger laying Upon her skinny lips. — You should be women, And yet your beards forbid me to interpret That you are so.
Page 384 - In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen ; in vain did the hardiest veterans, extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes, while the horsemen hovering on the Hank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 253 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart of a King, and of a King of England too...
Page 3 - Professor of Anglo-Saxon in the University of Oxford ; Author of the Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, etc., etc. " Quite a practical work, and contains a vast quantity of important information, well arranged, and brought up to the present improved state of philology. I have never seen so much matter brought together in so short a space.
Page 76 - ... of forest laws, imported from the continent, whereby the slaughter of a beast was made almost as penal as the death of a man. In the Saxon times, though no man was allowed to kill or chase the king's deer, yet he might start any game, pursue, and kill it upon his own estate.
Page 5 - History of English Literature; with an OUTLINE of the ORIGIN and GROWTH of the ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Illustrated by EXTRACTS. For Schools and Private Students. By WILLIAM SPALDING, AM, Professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and Metaphysics, in the University of St Andrews.

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