Feats on the Fiord: A Tale of Norway

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Knight, 1846 - 232 pages
 

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Page 232 - Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; Nor for the arrow that flieth by day; Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; Nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.
Page 232 - A thousand shall fall at thy side, And ten thousand at thy right hand; But it shall not come nigh thee.
Page 10 - Still as everything is to the eye, sometimes for a hundred miles together along these deep sea- valleys there is rarely silence. The ear is kept awake by a thousand voices. In the summer there are cataracts leaping from ledge to ledge of the rocks ; and there is the bleating of the kids that browse there...
Page 11 - ... sea-birds which inhabit the islets ; and all these sounds are mingled and multiplied by the strong echoes, till they become a din as loud as that of a city. Even at night, when the flocks are in the fold, and the birds at roost, and the echoes themselves seem to be asleep, there is occasionally a sweet music heard, too soft for even the listening ear to catch by day. Every breath of summer wind that steals through the pine-forests wakes this music as it goes.
Page 9 - EVERY one who has looked at the map of Norway must have been struck with the singular character of its coast. On the map it looks so jagged, such a strange mixture of land and sea, that it appears as if there must be a perpetual struggle between the two, — the sea striving to inundate the land, and the land pushing itself out into the sea, till it ends in their dividing the region between them. On the spot, however, this coast is very sublime.
Page 109 - How the spray from their oars glittered in the sun ; and how their wake lengthened with every stroke ! No spectator from the shore (if there had been any) could have doubted that the boat was in pursuit of the skiff, and would snap it up presently. Rolf saw that he had five determined foes, gaining upon him every instant ; and yet he was not alarmed. He had had his reasons for thinking himself safe near Vogel islet ; and, calculating for a moment the time of the tide, he was quite at his ease. As...
Page 11 - ... and blazing across the sky. Nor is this all. Wherever there is a nook between the rocks on the shore, where a man may build a house, and clear a field or two ; wherever there is a platform beside the cataract where the sawyer may plant his mill, and make a path from it to join some great road, there is a human habitation, and the sounds that belong to it. Thence, in winter nights, come music and laughter, and the tread of dancers, and the hum of many voices. The Norwegians are a social and hospitable...
Page 10 - There, the planets cast a faint shadow, as the young moon does with us; and these planets and the constellations of the sky, as they silently glide...
Page 9 - ... sea striving to inundate the land, and the land pushing itself out into the sea, till it ends in their dividing the region between them. On the spot, however, this coast is very sublime. The long straggling promontories are mountainous, towering ridges of rock, springing up in precipices from the water ; while the bays between them, instead of being rounded with shelving sandy shores on which the sea tumbles its waves, as in bays of our coast, are, in fact, long narrow valleys, filled with sea,...
Page 12 - January night, a hundred years ago, there was a great merriment in the house of a farmer who had fixed his abode within the arctic circle, in Nordland, not far from the foot of Sulitelma, the highest mountain in Norway. This dwelling, with its few fields about it, was in a recess between the rocks, on the shore of the fiord, about five miles from Saltdalen, and two miles from the junction of the Salten's Elv (river) with the fiord. It was but little that Erlingsen's fields would produce, though they...

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