The Second Usurpation of Buonaparte: Or, A History of the Causes, Progress and Termination of the Revolution in France in 1815: Particularly Comprising a Minute and Circumstantial Account of the Ever-memorable Victory of Wateloo. To which are Added Appendices, Containing the Official Bulletins of this Glorious and Decisive Battle ...

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Page 175 - Buonaparte has destroyed the only legal title on which his existence depended : by appearing again in France, with projects of confusion and disorder, he has deprived himself of the protection of the law, and has manifested to the universe that there can be neither peace nor truce with him. The powers consequently declare, that Napoleon Buonaparte has...
Page 162 - At length a light trampling of horses became audible. It approached: an open carriage, attended by a few hussars and dragoons, appeared on the skirts of the forest. It drove down the hills with the rapidity of lightning: it reached the advanced posts - ''Long live the Emperor" burst from the astonished soldiery! "Napoleon ! Napoleon the Great...
Page 181 - ... already have joined his faction, or shall hereafter join it, in order to force him to desist from his projects, and to render him unable to disturb in future the tranquillity of Europe, and the general peace under the protection of which the rights, the liberty, and independence of nations had been recently placed and secured.
Page 191 - When, in the time of danger, I called my people to arms to combat for the freedom and independence of the country, the whole mass of the youth, glowing with emulation, thronged round the standards to bear with joyful self-denial unusual hardships, and resolved to brave death itself. Then the best strength of the people intrepidly joined the ranks of my brave soldiers, and my generals led with me into battle a host of heroes, who have shewn themselves worthy of the name of their fathers, and heirs...
Page 176 - May 30, 1814, and the dispositions sanctioned by that treaty, and those which they have resolved on, or shall hereafter resolve on, to complete and to consolidate it, they will employ all their means, and will unite all their efforts, that the general peace, the object of the wishes of Europe, and the constant purpose of their labours, may not again...
Page 323 - French honour, and the wishes of the nation, have brought me back to that throne which is dear to me, because it is the palladium of the independence, of the honour, and the rights of the people. Frenchmen ! in...
Page 183 - Separate Article. As circumstances might prevent his Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from keeping constantly in the field the number of troops specified in the second Article...
Page 228 - Princes are the first citizens of the state. Their authority is more or less extended according to the interests of the nations whom they govern. The sovereignty itself is only hereditary because the welfare of the people requires it. Departing from this principle I know no legitimacy. " I have renounced the idea of the grand empire, of which during fifteen years I had but founded the basis. Henceforth the happiness and the consolidation of the French empire shall be all my thoughts.
Page 96 - France fighting against them, to withdraw themselves from their yoke, is their condemnation. " The veterans of the armies of the Sambre and the Meuse, of the Rhine, of Italy, of Egypt, of the West, of the grand army, are all humiliated : their...
Page 175 - Buonaparte has placed himself without the pale of civil and social relations ; and that, as an enemy and disturber of the tranquillity of the world, he has rendered himself liable to public vengeance.

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