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his fine countenance glittered with animation, the stranger gazed at him with intense admiration. They were kindred souls, and in that interchange of looks they understood each other's feelings as thoroughly as though lengthened conversations had passed between them. Antonio then read the Prince's letter, which contained many well - turned compliments on his poem, and requested the pleasure of a visit from him.

The two young men accordingly proceeded forthwith to the M—- Palace, and if the Prince had been delighted with the creation of Antonio's mind, he was equally charmed by the dignity and graceful ease of his bearing, and the noble, expressive beauty of his countenance. It was impossible to look on Antonio without feeling a deep interest in his fate, and the Prince contemplated with anxiety the languid eye and pale cheek of the young poet.

He drew from Antonio the history of his recent losses, his yearning ambition and his late mortifications, all of which were told in

the simple and energetic language of true feeling. The Prince requested him soon to repeat his visit, and so rapidly did Antonio gain on his esteem and regard, that he shortly offered him the office of his secretary, which had been resigned by its late efficient occupant, whose delicate health required change of scene.

Antonio had formed a close intimacy and friendship with this young man, and had observed with sincere sorrow the inroads which that most treacherous and invidious of all diseases was making in his slender frame; as is often the case in consumption, the young secretary knew not that he was in the grasp of the destroyer, and fancied that the breezes from his native hills, the tender nursing of his mother, and the sight of one dearer to him than country or kindred, and to whom he was betrothed, would entirely renovate his drooping frame and failing spirits. ' Antonio, who knew that he was going to seek a grave, took leave of him with ill- subdued emotion, his fine countenance glittered with animation, the stranger gazed at him with intense admiration. They were kindred souls, and in that interchange of looks they understood each other's feelings as thoroughly as though lengthened conversations had passed between them. Antonio then read the Prince's letter, which contained many well-turned compliments on his poem, and requested the pleasure of a visit from him.

The two young men accordingly proceeded forthwith to the M-Palace, and if the Prince had been delighted with the creation of Antonio's mind, he was equally charmed by the dignity and graceful ease of his bearing, and the noble, expressive beauty of his countenance. It was impossible to look on Antonio without feeling a deep interest in his fate, and the Prince contemplated with anxiety the languid eye and pale cheek of the young poet.

He drew from Antonio the history of his recent losses, his yearning ambition and his late mortifications, all of which were told in the simple and energetic language of true feeling The Prince requested him soon to repeat his visit, and so rapidly did Antonio gain on his esteem and regard, that he shortly offered him the office of his secretary, which had been resigned by its late efficient occupant, whose delicate health required change of scene.

Antonio had formed a close intimacy and friendship with this

this young

young man, and had observed with sincere sorrow the inroads which that most treacherous and invidious of all diseases was making in his slender frame; as is often the case in consumption, the young secretary knew not that he was in the grasp of the destroyer, and fancied that the breezes from his native hills, the tender nursing of his mother, and the sight of one dearer to him than country or kindred, and to whom he was betrothed, would entirely renovate his drooping frame and failing spirits. Antonio, who knew that he was going to seek a grave, took leave of him with ill- subdued emotion,

and listened to his joyous anticipation of a renewal of their intimacy, with a full heart.

He went to his loved home, and his fond, widowed mother, and his gentle betrothed; and at first the flame of his failing life burned with renewed vigour, as those dear ones surrounded him with tenderness; and his fevered temples and flushed cheek felt the refreshing winds of his birth-place playing over them ; but this excitement only wasted the little strength that remained, and in a few weeks his intended bride had first learned to grieve, and his mother was childless, and the winds stirred the garlands on his humble grave

stone.

Oh! Death, Death! thou ruthless tyrant, thou pitiless destroyer ; why is it that thou passest over the languid and heart-broken, whose life is a burden, and who woos thee,

as the lover woos his mistress, and selectest the young and beautiful, the sky of whose future is unclouded, whose prospects are bathed in a flood of sunlight, and whose

even

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