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leisure to view all the errors of her own character and her past life. Her mind became strengthened by judicious reading and constant occupation, and no one who had known her in her thoughtless girlhood, with her laughing eyes and frequent smile, could have recognized her in the pensive, interesting woman. She associated with no one in the neighbourhood, and devoted herself entirely to the mother she had widowed by her unkind desertion of her loved father.

Louisa's astonishment was extreme when she discovered that none of her letters, excepting the last she wrote, had ever been received by her friends; this added tenfold to her grief for her father's death; the idea of what he must have felt at her seeming ingratitude was torture to her, and again and again did she request her mother to repeat to her the blessing which his dying lips had called down on her. But time passed, and her grief softened into a subdued sadness.

CHAPTER V.

“Ah! from sleep
Most vainly must my weary brain implore
Its long lost flattery now : I wake to weep,
And sit through the long day gnawing the core
Of my bitter heart, and, like a miser keep,
Since none in what I feel take pain or pleasure
In my own soul its self-consuming treasure !”

SHELLEY.

Mrs. Bently passed much of her time with Teresa St. John, and the fiend in her bosom was always less torturing under the influence of Lady St. John's gentle presence and soothing words.

One evening a party was assembled at the St. John's villa, consisting of the Bentlys, leisure to view all the errors of her own character and her past life. Her mind became strengthened by judicious reading and constant occupation, and no one who had known her in her thoughtless girlhood, with her laughing eyes and frequent smile, could have recognized her in the pensive, interesting woman. She associated with no one in the neighbourhood, and devoted herself entirely to the mother she had widowed by her unkind desertion of her loved father.

Louisa's astonishment was extreme when she discovered that none of her letters, excepting the last she wrote, had ever been received by her friends ; this added tenfold to her grief for her father's death; the idea of what he must have felt at her seeming ingratitude was torture to her, and again and again did she request her mother to repeat to her the blessing which his dying lips had called down on her. But time passed, and her grief softened into a subdued sadness.

CHAPTER V.

“ Ab! from sleep
Most vainly must my weary brain implore
Its long lost flattery now : I wake to weep,
And sit through the long day gnawing the core
Of my bitter heart, and, like a miser keep,
Since none in what I feel take pain or pleasure
In my own soul its self-consuming treasure !

SHELLEY.

Mrs. BENTLY passed much of her time with Teresa St. John, and the fiend in her bosom was always less torturing under the influence of Lady St. John's gentle presence and soothing words.

One evening a party was assembled at the St. John's villa, consisting of the Bentlys, leisure to view all the errors of her own character and her past life. Her mind became strengthened by judicious reading and constant occupation, and no one who had known her in her thoughtless girlhood, with her laughing eyes and frequent smile, could have recognized her in the pensive, interesting woman. She associated with no one in the neighbourhood, and devoted herself entirely to the mother she had widowed by her unkind desertion of her loved father.

Louisa's astonishment was extreme when she discovered that none of her letters, excepting the last she wrote, had ever been received by her friends ; this added tenfold to her grief for her father's death; the idea of what he must have felt at her seeming ingratitude was torture to her, and again and again did she request her mother to repeat to her the blessing which his dying lips had called down on her. But time passed, and her grief softened into a subdued sadness.

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