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one else had communicated, a poor infirm old woman, dressed in the coarsest materials, which were, however, scrupulously clean, and a widow's cap, came slowly up one of the aisles, and, with almost shrinking humility, knelt down alone before the altar. She had apparently considered herself unworthy to come in contact with the goodly throng who had preceded her, and, therefore, lingered till all had finished, At length she arose, and passed Mrs. Bolton's pew on her way back to her seat.

Teresa had watched her with interest, and saw her seat herself apart from every one. She seemed to stand alone in the world-she looked as though she were used to scorn, and inured to sorrow; but her furrowed face shone with trusting joy after her communion, and Teresa felt convinced, that not one individual of that courtly, noble, and fashionable congregation there assembled, was more dear, nay, perhaps, not half so precious in the sight of heaven and the holy angels, as this poor, despised, and lone widow.

Teresa was pleased to find herself again at home without having encountered Sedley; and a few days afterwards she read his departure for the Continent in a newspaper.

Teresa was conscious that she was the cause of his leaving home and country, and many bitter tears did she shed over the few cold words announcing his departure.

One morning Catherine Brand received an invitation to pass some weeks with her aunt Derby, which she showed to Teresa, saying, with a smile, “My aunt is really very considerate! She wishes me to leave London just at the moment when it is most attractive ; and, besides this consideration, her's is the most tire. some neighbourhood in England. Now, there are no young people, and Sedley, the agreeable Sedley, seems quite to have deserted his place there. I should, under these circumstances, be the only connecting link between age and infancy, which is a position I should not altogether relish.”

" I thought,” said Teresa, “ that you were

much attached to Plover's Cliff, as being near the scenes where your childhood was passed.”

“I am indeed attached to every spot of ground there," replied Catherine, with emotion, “but everything is so altered to me, that unless either you or my sister were there with me, the associations with which it teems would be too painful for me to bear.

Surely, no creature ever had a keener capacity for suffering than I have, and no one ever had that capacity more tried.

" I was educated far from my parents whom I tenderly loved; and when months and months passed, and I saw them not, neither heard the voice of love, then melancholy first eat into my

I lived to see those same beloved parents reduced from affluence to comparative poverty, (for my fortune has been left me lately) I witnessed the anguish it caused them; the furrowing cheek, the whitening hair, the dimming eye, as friends (base reptiles !) who had fed at their hospitable board, and fawned and

young heart.

Teresa was pleased to find herself again at home without having encountered Sedley; and a few days afterwards she read his departure for the Continent in a newspaper.

Teresa was conscious that she was the cause of his leaving home and country, and many bitter tears did she shed over the few cold words announcing his departure.

One morning Catherine Brand received an invitation to pass some weeks with her aunt Derby, which she showed to Teresa, saying, with a smile, “My aunt is really very considerate! She wishes me to leave London just at the moment when it is most attractive; and, besides this consideration, her's is the most tire. some neighbourhood in England. Now, there are no young people, and Sedley, the agreeable Sedley, seems quite to have deserted his place there. I should, under these circumstances, be the only connecting link between age and infancy, which is a position I should not altogether

relish.”

" I thought," said Teresa, “ that you were

scene

much attached to Plover's Cliff, as being near the scenes where your childhood was passed.”

“I am indeed attached to every spot of ground there,” replied Catherine, with emotion, “ but everything is so altered to me, that unless either you or my sister were there with me, the associations with which it teems would be too painful for me to bear.

“Surely, no creature ever had a keener capacity for suffering than I have, and no one ever had that capacity more tried.

“ I was educated far from my parents whom I tenderly loved ; and when months and months passed, and I saw them not, neither heard the voice of love, then melancholy first eat into my young heart. I lived to see those same beloved parents reduced from affluence to comparative poverty, (for my fortune has been left me lately) I witnessed the anguish it caused them; the furrowing cheek, the whitening hair, the dimming eye, as friends (base reptiles !) who had fed at their hospitable board, and fawned and

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