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It was now late in August, and the period arrived for the annual races at

to take place. Teresa had never seen English races, nor had she the slightest curiosity to attend any; but as Mrs. Derby did not chuse to go herself the first day, she sent Teresa in the carriage with her children. The weather was most unfortunately wet, as it invariably is in England when any out-of-door amusements are going on.

Teresa amused herself by looking around her, and observing the countenances of the gay crowd thronging the race-course.

A race-course is a curious sight, if we observe all the minutiæ of what is passing. On one side of the carriage Teresa saw two very ill-looking men carrying those thimble tables, and inviting people to try their luck; the younger of the two was a most strange looking being; he was apparently not more than two or three and twenty years of age, but his look was utterly hardened. His complexion had been originally fair, but was now a dingy yellow; he had large,

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composed of firs and cedars.

Deanness, the gloom of its aspect. and velvety lawn was lai”, taste, and at its foot

h a revolting swept along, on t}

uis apology for a far-spreading pa

a one side of his head; filled with gra

wparel betokened an effort at to their sum ug in his degraded way. +

There i vod!” thought Teresa, “how melanparks and terrible is the thought that this lost, cour

pitched being, preying on the rest of his species, and, it is to be feared, irreparably sunk

wickedness, might have been an ornament

his kind, high, holy, majestical! for has he not the glorious spark of divinity, called a soul, in common with a Milton or a Shakspeare ?”.

There was one gypsey on the course whose form and features were perfect.

She stood watching her companion, who was telling the fortunes of a carriage-party, and whenever she caught her merry, cunning eye, she turned away and laughed heartily. There was a young girl in that carriage listening eagerly to the

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predictions. Teresa had observed her me, and had thought she had never imate and lifeless a creature in a

but when the gypsey apspoke a few words to her, a bright mush diffused itself over her fair cheeks temples, and her mild eyes flashed brilliantly for a moment. It seemed as though sorrow had rendered her superstitious, and she even clung to the idle promises of changed fortune, glibly strung together by a vagrant. Poor thing! Teresa pitied her sincerely, as she watched the sudden emotions flitting across her countenance, as the cunning gypsey touched on chords that vibrated to her inmost feelings. When the woman left the side of the carriage, an elderly lady, apparently the young girl's mother, spoke a few words to her, probably relative to the nonsensical farrago they had been hearing, and the poor girl sighed deeply as she sank back in the carriage, and relapsed into her statue-like indifference. On the other side of Teresa there was a very different party-a fine

heavy, grey eyes which expressed meanness, eagerness, sottishness, and fixed depravity all combined ; his dirty yellow hair was very long, and pushed out at one side with a revolting attempt at smartness, and his apology for a hat was jauntily worn on one side of his head ; the rest of his apparel betokened an effort at looking dashing in his degraded way. +

“ Good God!” thought Teresa, “how melancholy and terrible is the thought that this lost, wretched being, preying on the rest of his species, and, it is to be feared, irreparably sunk in wickedness, might have been an ornament to his kind, high, holy, majestical ! for has he not the glorious spark of divinity, called a soul, in common with a Milton or a Shakspeare?”

There was one gypsey on the course whose form and features were perfect. She stood watching her companion, who was telling the fortunes of a carriage-party, and whenever she caught her merry, cunning eye, she turned away and laughed heartily. There was a young girl in that carriage listening eagerly to the gypsey's predictions. Teresa had observed her for some time, and had thought she had never beheld so inanimate and lifeless a creature in a gay assemblage ; but when the gypsey approached and spoke a few words to her, a bright crimson flush diffused itself over her fair cheeks and temples, and her mild eyes flashed brilliantly for a moment. It seemed as though sorrow had rendered her superstitious, and she even clung to the idle promises of changed fortune, glibly strung together by a vagrant. Poor thing! Teresa pitied her sincerely, as she watched the sudden emotions fitting across her countenance, as the cunning gypsey touched on chords that vibrated to her inmost feelings. When the woman left the side of the carriage, an elderly lady, apparently the young girl's mother, spoke a few words to her, probably relative to the nonsensical farrago they had been hearing, and the poor girl sighed deeply as she sank back in the carriage, and relapsed into her statue-like indifference. On the other side of Teresa there was a very different party—a fine

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