Paradise lost, book i. (ii.), ed. with intr. and notes by F. Storr, Book 1

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Page 13 - Sing, heavenly muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of chaos : or, if Sion hill Delight thee more, and Siloa's brook that flow'd Fast by the oracle of God, I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventrous song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above the Aonian mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.
Page 15 - He with his thunder, and till then who knew The force of those dire arms? Yet not for those, Nor what the potent Victor in his rage Can else inflict do I repent or change...
Page 17 - The seat of desolation, void of light, Save what the glimmering of these livid flames Casts pale and dreadful? Thither let us tend* From off the tossing of these fiery waves, There rest, if any rest can...
Page 14 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round As one great furnace flamed, yet from those flames No light, but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all...
Page 20 - He scarce had ceased, when the superior fiend Was moving toward the shore: his ponderous shield, Ethereal temper, massy, large, and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views, At evening, from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Page 21 - They heard, and were abash'd, and up they sprung Upon the wing ; as when men, wont to watch On duty, sleeping found by whom they dread, Rouse and bestir themselves ere well awake.
Page 19 - Almighty hath not built Here for his envy, will not drive us hence: Here we may reign secure, and, in my choice, To reign is worth ambition, though in hell: Better to reign in hell, than serve in heaven.
Page 16 - Extort from me. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deify his power Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire, that were low indeed; That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by fate the strength of gods And this empyreal* substance cannot fail...
Page 31 - As bees In spring-time, when the sun with Taurus rides, Pour forth their populous youth about the hive In clusters ; they among fresh dews and flowers Fly to and fro, or on the smoothed plank, The suburb of their straw-built citadel, New rubb'd with balm, expatiate and confer Their state affairs...
Page 21 - Pour'd never from her frozen loins, to pass Rhene or the Danaw, when her barbarous sons Came like a deluge on the south, and spread Beneath Gibraltar to the Libyan sands.

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