London to Lahore: Or, The Euphrates, Scinde and Punjaub Railways ... with Digest of Trade of Syria and Mesopotamia, Last Report of the Punjaub Government on Railways, and Map

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E. Wilson, 1857 - Railroads - 50 pages
 

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Page 41 - Before a year had elapsed,' says Mr. Baker, ' hundreds of animals, camels, horses and asses were seen day and night conveying grain to the coast, pursuant to contract. The succeeding year a still greater number were engaged in this business, and there is no doubt, were roads made, that the agriculture of the whole of the interior would increase so rapidly that the produce would be sold at very remunerating prices.
Page 42 - Mediterranean ; and that the only things requisite to develope the wonderful capabilities thus presented are carriage roads, railways or tramways to the coast, and a reform of the Turkish currency, which tends to embarrass every transaction, especially those depending upon a system of contracts. When it is considered that the proposed Euphrates Railway will not only supply all the facilities demanded, but is to shorten the journey to India by almost onehalf, the changes impending in the destinies...
Page 2 - The Euphrates Valley Railway would give them the command of the sea-board of the Persian Gulf, the completion of that railway would practically make Chatham nearer to any point of action in the Persian territory, than any military force which could be brought to bear upon it from Central Asia.
Page 49 - From the centre or back-bone of the tract, there naturally run drainage channels to the rivei's; consequently, while a road. traversing the Doab, near the banks of either river, must cross or be intersected by numerous little streams, a line constructed in the centre would meet none of them. But the railroad would run near the central, or dorsal ridge, parallel to the course of the new Baree Doab Canal, and, consequently, the line will perhaps not meet with any stream whatever. There being no streams,...
Page 50 - ... cheapness of hire. It is upon this condition, namely, that of moderate hire, that the rail may be expected to supersede the native river boats. In a succeeding chapter the improvement of the river navigation will be urged. If this most desirable end should be accomplished, as well as the railway, the...
Page 50 - ... but if the arguments urged should (as it is fully believed they will) be supported by statistical facts and data, then it were superfluous to dilate on the importance of a scheme which will affect the trade of all North- Western India, will give birth to a new commerce yet undeveloped, will be carried out with unusual facility, will prove financially profitable in a high degree, will vitally concern the best material interests of twenty-one millions of industrious people, and will conduce more...
Page 47 - ... facilities for the manufacture of saltpetre, which is even now largely made to meet a foreign demand ; and from the same soil, carbonate of soda could be profitably made. The numerous flocks of sheep in the extensive pasturage of the central districts, and in the hills and valleys of the North, yield a wool that is already exported, and which might become an export of magnitude. There are various articles of manufacture fit for exportation, such as the shawls, stuffs, silks, and carpets of Umritsur,...
Page 45 - ... the one hand, and of Central Asia on the other. To this city there come the choicest Asiatic products, the wool of Thibet, the shawls of Cashmere, the dried fruit and spices of Affghanistan, the carpets of Turkey, the silk of Bokhara, the furs and skins of Tartary, the chintzes and leather of Russia. In return for these arrive the piece goods and iron of Europe, the fabrics of Bengal, the sugar of Hindoostan and the Punjaub.
Page 49 - ... obtainable from the Hills by water carriage ; fire-wood exists in the utmost abundance : kunkur would be generally procurable for at least half the distance; masonry would not be much needed; if it were, there are ample facilities for brickmaking; the population near the line is sparse, but Libour is largely procurable from other parts of this country for any great work.
Page 43 - ... the first or Easterly division, the stream of trade and wealth must ever flow down the valley of the Ganges to the natural outlet of Calcutta. In the second or Westerly division, if the power of Art and Science be brought to the aid of nature, the commerce could follow the direction of the...

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