Yorkshire; or, Original delineations ... of that county

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Page 268 - Of mimic'd statesmen and their merry king. No wit to flatter left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 33 - Cuthbert, of blessed memory, who had been lately ordained bishop, the enemy made show as if they fled, and the king was drawn into the straits of inaccessible mountains, and slain, with the greatest part of his forces, on the 20th of May, in the fortieth year of his age, and the fifteenth of his reign.
Page 836 - He far exceeded all other statesmen in the art of drawing together, without the seduction of self-interest, the concurrence and co-operation of various dispositions and abilities of men, whom he assimilated to his character and associated in his labours. For it was his aim through life to convert party connection, and personal friendship (which others had rendered subservient only to temporary views and the purposes of ambition,) into a lasting depository of his principles, that their energy should...
Page 684 - Hebrew grammars, then in England, and appointed five keepers to whom he granted yearly salaries. At the dissolution of religious houses in the reign of Henry VIII., Durham college, where he...
Page 749 - Leeds, Halifax, and Bradford, three very populous and rich towns, (which depending wholly upon clothiers naturally maligned the gentry,) were wholly at their disposition.
Page 683 - The town of Ripon to this day, honours the memory of its benefactor by an annual feast, which continues nearly a week. On the Saturday next after Jammas-day, the effigy of the prelate is brought into the town, preceded by music : the people go out to meet it, and, with every demonsration of joy, commemorate the return of their former patron from exile t.
Page 546 - EDWARD, by the grace of God king of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitain, to...
Page 490 - ... governor, could not, without betraying the trust committed to him, open the gates to so great a train as his majesty was attended with.
Page 41 - Piracy was not only the most honourable occupation, but the best harvest of wealth ; it was not only consecrated to public emulation, by the illustrious who pursued it, but no one was esteemed noble, no one was respected, who did not return in the winter with ships laden with booty."* Even the land kings were addicted to piracy: it was their general employment in the summer months.
Page 260 - If to perfection these plantations rise, If they agreeably my heirs surprise, This faithful pillar will their age declare, As long as time these characters shall spare. Here then with kind remembrance read his name, Who for posterity performed the same.

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