History of Europe from the commencement of the French revolution ... to the restoration of the Bourbons

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Page 158 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order, their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful v.olleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as slowly and with a horrid carnage it was pushed by the incessant vigour of the...
Page 3 - ... the cause of mankind ; then the arm of Nelson cast its thunderbolts on every shore, and preserved unscathed in the deep the ark of European freedom ; and ere...
Page 158 - In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen ; in vain did the hardiest veterans, extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes, while the horsemen hovering on the flank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 43 - And whereas to pursue schemes of conquest and extension of dominion in India are measures repugnant to the wish, the honour and the policy of this nation...
Page 50 - Mediterranean that we prefer to the sure, regular, and increasing North American trade — a trade placed beyond the reach of the enemy's power, and which supports at once all that remains of the liberty of the seas, and gives life and vigour to its main pillar within the realm, the manufactures and commerce of England.
Page 158 - ... bent on the dark columns in their front ; their measured tread shook the ground ; their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation; their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as foot by foot, and with a horrid carnage, it was driven by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hill.
Page 28 - Constituents, whose character as free-men, and even whose personal safety, depend, in so great a degree, upon the decision of this question - a question of no less importance than this: Whether our liberty be still to be secured by the laws of our forefathers, or be to lay at the absolute mercy of a part of our fellow-subjects,' collected together by means which it is not necessary for me to describe.
Page 18 - I am the unfortunate man ; my name is Bellingham ; it is a private injury ; I know what I have done ; it was a denial of justice on the part of Government.
Page 188 - ... influence of religion. Impressed with these reflections, he will behold with indulgence, perhaps even with interest, the crosses which frequently mark the brow of a precipice, and the little chapels hollowed out of the rock where the road is narrowed; he will consider them as so many pledges of security, and rest assured, that, as long as the pious mountaineer continues to adore the
Page 37 - That although the adverse circumstances of our trade, together with the large amount of our military expenditure abroad, may have contributed to render our exchanges with the continent of Europe unfavourable, yet the extraordinary degree in which the exchanges have been depressed for so long a period, has been in a great measure occasioned by the depreciation which has taken place in the relative value of the currency of this...

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