An Account Of The Manners Customs And Of The Modern Egyptians:The Definitive 1860 Edition

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American Univ in Cairo Press, 2003 - History - 619 pages
Few works about the Middle East have exerted such wide and long-lasting influence as Edward William Lane's An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians. First published in 1836, this classic book has never gone out of print, continuously providing material and inspiration for generations of scholars, writers, and travelers, who have praised its comprehensiveness, detail, and perception. Yet the editions in print during most of the twentieth century would not have met Lane's approval. Lacking parts of Lane's text and many of his original illustrations (while adding many that were not his), they were based on what should have been ephemeral editions, published long after the author's death. Meanwhile, the definitive fifth edition of 1860, the result of a quarter century of Lane's corrections, reconsiderations, and additions, long ago disappeared from bookstore shelves. Now the 1860 edition of Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians is available again, with a useful general introduction by Jason Thompson. Lane's greatest work enters the twenty-first century in precisely the form that he wanted.
 

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An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians: the definitive 1860 edition

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A pioneering British anthropologist, Lane first went to Egypt in 1825, where he learned both classical and colloquial Arabic and began amassing and assessing his impressions and observations of ... Read full review

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One of the great books, a marvel. Read full review

Contents

Sketeh in a GuestChamber Frontispieee tmuk
1
Private Houses in Cairo
5
Door of a Private House
7
Speeimens of Lattieework
8
Court of a Private House in Cairo
10
Pavement of a Durkaah
11
fountain
13
Suffeh ft 9 Speeimens of Panelwork
14
Charaeter 270
307
Shops in a Street of Cairo
314
Shop of a Turkish Merchant in the Sook called Khan ElKhaleelee
316
Sakkas
320
Saka Sharbeh
321
Hemalees
322
Erksoosee
323
Muscllikatec
324

Ceiling of a Durkaah
15
Ceiling of a projeeting Window ft 12 A Kaah
16
Wooden Loek
19
Personal Characteristies and Dress of the Muslim Egyptians
25
Men of the Middle and Higher Classes
29
Men of the Lower Classes
32
The Mukleh
36
Mukhulahs and Mirweds
37
Hands and Feet stained with Henna
38
A tattooed Girl
40
Tattooed Hands and Foot ft 25 A Lady in the Dress worn in private
42
A Lady adorned with the Kurs and Safa c
44
Ladies attired for Riding or Walking
46
Women and Children of the Lower Classes
48
A Woman elad in the Milayeh e
49
Ornamented blaek Veils
50
The Asbeh ft 32 A Woman of the Southern Provinee of Upper Egypt
51
Parade previous to Cireumeision
58
A SehoolBoy learning the Alphabet
60
CHAPTER m
64
Vessels for Ablution
69
Postures of Prayer
76
Postures of Prayereontinned
77
Interior of a Mosque
80
CHAPTER IV
110
CHAPTER V
132
Pipes
135
7
140
Tisht and Ibreek
142
Washing before or after a Meal
143
A Party at Dinner or Supper
144
Waterbottles Ddraks with covers of different kinds
147
Waterbottles Kullehs
148
Brass Drinkingcups
149
Sherbetcups
151
Lantern c suspended on the occasion of a Wedding
162
Bridal Procession Part I
164
Bridal Procession Part II
165
Meshals
169
The Menseg
188
Ladics Riding
190
Kumkum and Mibkharah
203
Books and Apparatus for Writing
210
Periodical Public Festivals c Those of the first three months of
218
Magie Astrology and Alehymy
263
Magic Invocation and Charm
269
Magic Square and Mirror of Ink
270
The Shadoof
327
CHAPTER XVI
336
Section of the rlararah
338
Plan of a Bath
339
Footrasps
341
Mankalah
344
Seega
349
Kemengeh
357
A Performer on the Kemengeh
358
Kanoon
359
A Performer on the Kanoon
360
Ood
361
A Performer on the Ood
362
Nay ib 83 A Performer on the Nay
363
ltabab eshShaer
364
Sagat
365
Tar ib 87 Darabnkkeh S 88 and 89 Earthen Darabukkeh
367
DancingGirls Uhaway ee or Ghazeeyehs
378
A Shtter with his accompanying Violist and part of his Audienee
393
Whirling Darweesh
433
The Mahmal
439
The Ddsch
452
CHAPTER XXV
457
CHAPTER XXVI
488
Private Festivities e
501
FuneralProcession
513
Bier used for the conveyanee of the Corpse of a Female or Boy
518
Sketch of a Tomb with the Entranee uneovered
524
The Copts
529
Turban of the Coptic Patriarch and Bishops
533
Turban of a Coptic Priest
534
The Jews of Egypt
553
APPENDIX
560
Diamond Kurs
561
Kussah
562
Enebehs 108 and 109 Kamarabs
563
Akeek Ib 115 Bclloor i
564
Necklaces
565
Bracelets
566
120 121 and 122 Bark
567
Masoorah ft 124 IJabbeh ft 125 Shiftisheh ft 126 Anklets ft 127 Hegabs
568
Noserings
569
Egyptian Measures Weights and Moneys
571
Editors Notes
577
Tdk or Neckring ft 130 Part of the Interior of a Tumulus at Kerteh
587
Ornament from the Interior of a Tomb at Cairo
588
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Edward William Lane (1801-76), a name known to almost everyone in all the many fields of Middle East studies, was the author of a number of highly influential works: An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians (1836), his translation of The Thousand and One Nights (1839-41),Selections from the Kur-an (1843), and the Arabic-English Lexicon (1863-93). In 2000, his long-forgotten manuscript Description of Egypt was published for the first time by the AUC Press.

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