Sir Thomas More: his life and times, illustrated from his own writings and from contemporary documents

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Page 35 - Among others came in before him an old man with a white head, and one that was thought to be little less than a hundred years old.
Page 368 - Biron they call him; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit; For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor,) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Page 132 - Heron, of the loss of our barns and our neighbours' also, with all the corn that was therein, albeit (saving God's pleasure) it is great pity of so much good corn lost, yet sith it hath liked him to send us such a chance, we must and are bounden not only to be content, but also to be glad of his visitation. He sent us all that we have lost ; and sith he hath by such a chance taken it away again, his pleasure be fulfilled.
Page 163 - Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment: thou shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honour the person of the mighty: but in righteousness shalt thou judge thy neighbour.
Page 73 - I find his Grace my very good lord indeed; and I believe he doth as singularly favour me as any subject within this realm. Howbeit, Son Roper, I may tell thee I have no cause to be proud thereof, for if my head could win him a castle in France (for then was there war between us), it should not fail to go!
Page 72 - Whom when he perceived so much in his talk to delight that he could not once in a month get leave to go home to his wife and children, whose company he most desired...
Page 35 - More saw this aged man, he thought it expedient to hear him say his mind in this matter; for, being so old a man, it was likely that he knew most of any man in that presence and company. So Master More called this old aged man unto him, and said : 'Father...
Page 252 - I marvel that you, who have been hitherto always taken for a wise man, will now so play the fool as to lie here in this close, filthy prison, and be content to be shut up thus with mice and rats, when you might be abroad at your liberty...
Page 162 - ... upon him to Westminster Hall, as well noblemen and other worthy gentlemen, as noblemen and gentlemen of his own family ; thus passing forth with two great crosses of silver borne before him ; with also two great pillars of silver, and his pursuivant at arms with a great mace of silver gilt. Then his gentlemen ushers * cried, and said, ' On my Lords and Masters, on before ; make way for my Lord's Grace.
Page 373 - The writer of this letter would not cease till she had caused me likewise to set to my hand ; desiring you, though it be short, to take it in good part.

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