Memoirs of the Late Thomas Holcroft, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1816 - 320 pages
 

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Page 241 - I perceive any glimmering of truth before me, I readily pursue and endeavour to trace it to its source, without any reserve or caution of pushing the discovery too far, or opening too great a glare of it to the public. I look upon the discovery of any thing which is true, as a valuable acquisition to society ; which cannot possibly hurt or obstruct the good effect of any other truth whatsoever : for they all partake of one common essence, and necessarily coincide with each other ; and like the drops...
Page 246 - ... delivered the Sunday evening lectures at the Old Jewry, which were so popular about twenty years ago. He afterwards retired to Hedgegrove in Hertfordshire. It was here that I first became acquainted with him, and passed some of the pleasantest days of my life. He was the friend of my early youth. He was the first person of literary eminence whom I...
Page 207 - as to have been repeated under a thousand different modes ; and under a variety of forms and phraseology, to have been proverbial in all countries.' This obnoxious passage was the one, in which Craig Campbell, when insulted by a fashionable coxcomb, who asks what profession he was bred to, says that ' he was bred to the most useless, and often the most worthless, of all professions, that of a gentleman.' In this comedy, the author has more pointedly than in any other, set up the claims of worth...
Page 186 - Mr. Holcroft talked a great deal about Peace, of his being against any violent or coercive means, that were usually resorted to against our fellow-creatures ; urged the more powerful operation of Philosophy and Reason, to convince man of his errors ; that he would disarm his greatest enemy by those means, and oppose his fury.
Page 119 - The absurdity of his tenets, can only be equalled by the effrontery with which they are maintained. Among 118 the most ridiculous of what he calls first principles is that of the equality of mankind. He is one of your levellers ! Marry ! His superior ! Who is he ? On what proud eminence can he be found ? On some Welsh mountain, or the peak of Teneriffe ? Certainly not in any of the nether regions? Dispute his prerogative who dare! He derives from Adam ; what time the world was all " hail fellow well...
Page 140 - HO! why dost thou shiver and shake, Gaffer Gray ? And why does thy nose look so blue ? " 'Tis the weather that's cold, 'Tis I'm grown very old, And my doublet is not very new, Well-a-day!" Then line thy worn doublet with ale, Gaffer Gray! And warm thy old heart with a glass. " Nay, but credit I've none, And my money's all gone ; Then say how may that come to pass ? Well-a-day!
Page 100 - ... however at the moment was supposed to be accidental. He seemed unembarrassed, cheerful, and asked leave, without any appearance of design or hesitation, to dine with a friend in the city, which was immediately granted. He thanked his father, went down stairs, and several times anxiously inquired whether his father were gone to dress. As soon as he was told that he had left his room, he went up stairs again, broke open a drawer, and took out forty pounds. With this, the watch, a pocket-book, and...
Page 194 - Men do not become what by nature they are meant to be, but what society makes them. The generous feelings, and high propensities of the soul are, as it were, shrunk up, seared, violently wrenched, and amputated, to fit us for our intercourse with the world, something in the manner that beggars maim and mutilate their children, to make them fit for their future situation in life.
Page 120 - He will legislate, dictate, dogmatise, for who so infallible ? Cannot Goliah crack a walnut ? ' As for arguments, it is but ask and have : a peck at a bidding, and a good double handful over. I own I thought I knew something ; but no, I must to my horn-book. Then, for a simile, it is sacrilege ; and must be kicked out of the high court of logic ! Sarcasm too is an ignoramus, and cannot solve a problem ; wit a pert puppy, who can only flash and bounce. The heavy walls of wisdom are not to be battered...
Page 84 - To this his mistress replies, "They have so, — But you have, doubtless, too much native merit to arrogate to yourself the worth of others ! You are no jay, decked in the peacock's feathers ! You are not idiot enough to imagine that a skin of parchment, on which are emblazoned the arms and the acts of one wise man, with a long list of succeeding fools, is any honour to you ! Responsible to mankind for the use...

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