A Modern History of Hong Kong: 1841-1997

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Bloomsbury Academic, 2004 - History - 340 pages
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From a little-known fishing community at the periphery of China, Hong Kong developed into one of the world's most spectacular and cosmopolitan metropoles after a century and a half of British imperial rule. This history of Hong Kong - from its occupation by the British in 1841 to its return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997 - includes the foundation of modern Hong Kong; its developments as an imperial outpost, its transformation into the "pearl" of the British Empire and of the Orient and the events leading to the end of British rule. The book addresses the changing relations between the local Chinese and the expatriate communities in 156 years of British rule, and the emergence of a local identity. It ends with a critical but dispassionate examination of Hong Kong's transition from a British Crown Colony to a Chinese Special Administrative Region.

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Contents

War and Peace
3
The Foundation of a Crown Colony
16
Imperial Expansion
29
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Steve Tsang is Louis Cha Fellow and University Reader in Politics at St Antony's College, Oxford University. He served as Director of the Asian Studies Centre at Oxford from 1997 to 2003 and is author of "Hong Kong: An Appointment with China", also published by I.B. Tauris.

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