The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion

Front Cover
Adele Berlin
Oxford University Press, 2011 - Reference - 934 pages
1 Review
Hailed by Library Journal as the "best ready-reference access point to the Jewish religion," and as "essential" by CHOICE in its First Edition, The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion has been the go-to resource for students, scholars, and researchers in Judaic Studies since its 1997 publication. Now, The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion, Second Edition focuses on recent and changing rituals in the Jewish community that have come to the fore since the 1997 publication of the First Edition, including the growing trend of baby-naming ceremonies and the founding of gay/lesbian synagogues

Under the editorship of Adele Berlin, nearly 200 internationally renowned scholars have created a new edition that incorporates updated bibliographies, biographies of 20th-century individuals who have shaped the recent thought and history of Judaism, and an index with alternate spellings of Hebrew terms. Entries from the previous edition have been be revised, new entries commissioned, and cross-references added, all to increase ease of navigation research.

The Dictionary covers more than three millennia of Jewish religious thought, custom, law, and practice, from traditional approaches to Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, and post-denominational Judaism. Brief definitions and longer essays, all supplemented with bibliographies, enlighten readers about the major figures, folklore, and events in the history of Judaism throughout the world.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Alfred Gottschalk was NOT born in 1939. Please check your facts

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Robert H. Smith is Professor of Hebrew Bible at the University of Maryland and co-editor of the Jewish Study Bible. Dr. Berlin has published seven books as well as several volumes of Bible commentary and is a fellow of the American Academy of Jewish Research. Maxine Grosman is AssociateProfessor of Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland.

Bibliographic information