The young local preacher's guide

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Sellick, 1860 - Methodists - 115 pages
 

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Page 108 - Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him ; let him know that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.
Page 44 - When a king asked Euclid, the mathematician, •whether he could not explain his art to him in a more compendious manner ? he was answered, that there was no royal way to geometry.
Page 67 - a little Boy; not bigger than Boys generally are
Page 60 - ... matter what, or how hard, on which I could lay my head to sleep. Now I was warmly clothed, nay gorgeously ; for I was proud of my new livery, and never suspected that there was disgrace in it ; I fed voluptuously, not a prince on earth perhaps with half the appetite, and never-failing relish; and instead of being obliged to drag through the dirt after the most sluggish, obstinate, and despised among our animals, I was mounted on the noblest that the earth contains, had him under my care, and...
Page 57 - I was clothed; and the excessive weariness I endured in following these animals day after day, and being obliged to drive creatures perhaps still more weary than myself, were miseries much too great, and loaded my little heart with sorrows far too pungent ever to be forgotten.
Page 60 - Books were not then, as ••• they fortunately are now, great or small, on this subject or on that, to be found in almost every house : a book, except of prayers, or of daily religious use, was scarcely to be seen but among the opulent, or in the possession of the studious ; and by the opulent they were often disregarded with a degree of neglect which would now be almost disgraceful.
Page 97 - CHILDREN LEARN TO READ BY BEING IN THE PRESENCE OF BOOKS. THE LOVE OF KNOWLEDGE COMES WITH READING AND GROWS UPON IT. AND THE LOVE OF KNOWLEDGE, IN A YOUNG MIND, IS ALMOST A WARRANT AGAINST THE INFERIOR EXCITEMENT OF PASSIONS AND VICES.
Page 96 - Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house. The plainest row of books that cloth or paper ever covered is more significant of refinement than the most elaborately carved etagere or sideboard. Give us a house furnished with books rather than furniture ! Both, if you can, but books at any rate...
Page 61 - I despised my companions for the grossness of their ideas, and the total absence of every pursuit, in which the mind appeared to have any share. It was even with sneers of contempt that they saw me intent on acquiring some small portion of knowledge : so that I was far from having any prompter, either as a friend or a rival.
Page 13 - I want to know one thing, — the way to heaven ; how to land safe on that happy shore. God himself has condescended to teach the way : For this very end he came from heaven. He hath written it down in a book. O give me that book ! At any price, give me the book of God! I have it: Here is knowledge enough for me. Let me be homo unius libri...

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