The Bit O' Writin' and Other Tales, Volume 1

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E.L. Carey and A. Hart, 1838
 

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Page 46 - Is he gone ?" asked Will, when he regained his senses — " gone not to come back ?." — and having heard his mother's gentle assurances, he let his head fall on her shoulder, weeping while he continued : — " Mother, mother, it would destroy the little life I have ! I could not bear it for an hour ! The dread I am in of it was born with me ! When I was a child of four years, I had dreams of it, and I remember them to this day; they used to come in such crowds round my cradle ! As I grew up, you...
Page 142 - Carroll, or say he ever forgot his father's renown, or his love of his good God ; — an' sure the people are afther telling you by this time, how it come about that night — an' you, my lord, — an
Page 136 - ... grandson. About an hour afterwards Michaul came in cautiously through the still open window, and also undressed and reclined on his straw after glancing towards his father's bed, who pretended to be asleep. At the usual time for arising old Carroll saw him suddenly jump up and prepare to go abroad. He spoke to him, leaning on his elbow. "And what hottg3 is on yon now, ma-bauehal?" "Going for the good break'ast I promised you, father dear.
Page 139 - Enough to hang his son!" whispered Michaul to his father, as Mr. Evans' land steward, followed by his herdsman and two policemen, entered the cabin. In a few minutes afterwards the policemen had in charge the dismembered carcass of the sheep, dug up out of the floor of the barn, and were escorting Michaul, handcuffed, to the county gaol, in the vicinity of the next town. They could find no trace of the animal's skin, though they sought attentively for it ; this seemed to disappoint them and the steward...
Page 78 - ... high in the heavens, warned him that night asserted her full empire over the departed day, Shamus sank down upon the couch from which his father's mortal remains had lately been borne, supperless himself, and dinnerless too, but not hungry; at least not conscious, or recollecting that he was. His wife and little ones soon slept soundly, but Shamus lay for hours inacessible to nature's claims for sleep as well as for food.
Page 135 - He listened, and they ceased: but the familiar noise of an old barn door creaking on its crazy hinges came on his ear. It was now day-dawn. He dressed himself; stole out cautiously; peeped into the barn through a chink of the door, and all he had feared met full confirmation. There, indeed, sat Michaul, busily and earnestly engaged, with a frowning brow and a haggard face, in quartering the animal he had stolen from Mr.
Page 141 - ... to make out for him a case of natural necessity to swear falsely. The trial began. The first witness, the herdsman, proved the loss of. the sheep, and the finding the dismembered carcass in the old barn. The policemen and the steward followed to the same effect, and the latter added the allusions which he had heard the father make to the son, upon the morning of the arrest of the latter. The steward went down from the table. There was a pause, and complete silence, which the attorney for the...
Page 155 - ... lubberly swipes-seller, I say again. I thought as how it was a real awful thing that a strange landsman, before ever he laid eyes on either of us, should come to have this here dream about us. After falling in with Harry, when the lubber and I parted company, my old mate saw I was cast down, and he told me as much in his own gruff, well-meaning way; upon which I gave him the story, laughing at it. He didn't laugh in return, but grew glum — glummer than I ever seed him; and I wondered, and fell...
Page 173 - Stone did not lightly or hastily tell her so. Much younger than his rivals, perhaps he was more romantic, and, particularly since Lucy's late specimen of self-assertion, would not indulge his admiration with a view to any mean indulgence of it. And, in fact, when, after sitting in the shop, upon the flour-chest, or in the old chair, day after day for more than six months, he at last whispered his sentiments to Lucy, the declaration sounded seriously and respectfully to her ear, and, she concluded,...
Page 78 - ... by the magic effect of alternate moonshine and darkness, of objects and of their parts, at last diverted his mind, though not to relieve it. He remembered distinctly, for the first time, where he was, — an intruder among the dwellings of the dead ; he called to mind, too, that the present was their hour for revealing themselves among the remote loneliness and obscurity of their crumbling and intricate abode. As his eye fixed upon a distant stream of cold light or of blank shadow, either the...

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