Chronicles of saint Mungo: or, Antiquities and traditions of Glasgow

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 49 - Big with the vanity of state; But transient is the smile of fate! A little rule, a little sway, A sunbeam in a winter's day, Is all the proud and mighty have Between the cradle and the grave.
Page 76 - Looking tranquillity! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.
Page 39 - 11 superscribe it the nonsuch of Scotland, where an English florist may pick up a posie; so that should the residue of their cities, in our northern progress, seem as barren as uncultivated fields, and every field so replenished with thistles that a flower could scarcely flourish amongst them, yet would I celebrate thy praise, O Glasgow!
Page 370 - It is as well as it is. I had rather it should go out of the field with me ;" and in that manner, so becoming to a soldier, Moore was borne from the fight.
Page 370 - I hope the people of England will be satisfied!" "I hope my country will do me justice!
Page 401 - ... before the bench, kept his eye fixed with calm earnestness on his Lordship's face, assenting now and then to the propriety of what he said, by exactly that sort of see-saw gesture which you may have seen escape now and then from the devout listener to a pathetic sermon or sacramental service. John, in a short speech of his own, expressed his sense of his guilt ; but even then he borrowed the language of Scripture, styling himself " a sinner, and the chief of sinners.
Page 299 - That the complaints of the merchants of London, Liverpool, Whitehaven, &c. are groundless, and proceed from a spirit of envy, and not from a regard to the interests of trade, or to the King's revenue.
Page 424 - DUKE'S PALACE. [Enter DUKE, CURIO, LORDS; MUSICIANS attending.] DUKE. If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die.— That strain again;— it had a dying fall; O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour.— Enough; no more; 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Page 110 - A priest robed with surplice and stole went with the cross to the house of the doomed leper. The minister of the church began the necessary ceremonies by exhorting him to suffer, with a patient and penitent spirit, the incurable plague with which God had stricken him. He then sprinkled the unfortunate leper with holy water, and afterwards conducted him to the church, the usual burial verses being sung during their march thither.
Page 208 - Thereupon ensued a pitiful vastation of churches and church buildings throughout all parts of the realm ; for every one made bold to put to their hands, the meaner sort imitating the example of the greater and those who were in authority.

Bibliographic information