Essay on Irish Bulls

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Page 112 - But first, whom shall we send In search of this new world ; whom shall we find Sufficient? who shall tempt with wandering feet The dark, unbottomed, infinite abyss, And through the palpable obscure find out His uncouth way, or spread his airy flight, Upborne with indefatigable wings, Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
Page 110 - To live a life half dead, a living death, And buried; but, O yet more miserable! Myself my sepulchre, a moving grave ; Buried, yet not exempt, By privilege of death and burial, From worst of other evils, pains, and wrongs; But made hereby obnoxious more To all the miseries of life, Life in captivity Among inhuman foes.
Page 138 - ... matter concerning the stopping of Sandwich haven. Among others came in before him an old man with a white head, and one that was thought to be little less than a hundred years old.
Page 20 - If the same Socrates waking and sleeping do not partake of the same consciousness, Socrates waking and sleeping is not the same person; and to punish Socrates waking for what sleeping Socrates thought, and waking Socrates was never conscious of, would be no more of right than to punish one twin for what his brother-twin did, whereof he knew nothing, because their outsides were so like that they could not be distinguished; for such twins have been seen.
Page 230 - Shakespeare approximates the remote, and familiarizes the wonderful ; the event which he represents will not happen, but if it were possible, its effects would probably be such as he has assigned ; and it may be said, that he has not only shown human nature as it acts in real exigencies, but as it would be found in trials, to which it cannot be exposed.
Page 138 - Ye are the eldest man that I can espy in all this company, so that if any man can tell any cause of it, ye of likelihood can say most of it, or at leastwise more than any man here assembled. Yea, forsooth, good Master...
Page 127 - em,' says he. 'You lie,' says I. With that he ups with a lump of a two year old, and lets drive at me. I outs with my bread-earner, and gives it him up to Lamprey in the bread-basket.
Page 27 - Parmenio used with his friend Alexander, instead of putting his seal upon the lips of the curious impertinent, the English gentleman thought proper to reprove the Hibernian, if not with delicacy, at least with poetical justice. He concluded writing his letter in these words : ' I would say more, but a damned tall Irishman is reading over my shoulder every word I write.
Page 181 - ... into her carriage, the old woman began — " Agh! my lady; success to your ladyship, and success to your honour's honour, this morning, of all days in the year ; for sure didn't I dream last night that her ladyship gave me a pound of tea, and that your honour gave me a pound of tobacco ? "
Page 25 - I remember well, that when I went to the echo at Pont-Charenton, there was an old Parisian, that took it to be the work of spirits, and of good spirits. For...

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