Transactions of the Watford Natural History Society and Hertfordshire Field Club, Volume 1

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Page 54 - If thou art worn and hard beset With sorrows that thou wouldst forget, If thou wouldst read a lesson that will keep Thy heart from fainting and thy soul from sleep, Go to the woods and hills ! — No tears Dim the sweet look that Nature wears.
Page 58 - Owls move in a buoyant manner, as if lighter than the air; they seem to want ballast. There is a peculiarity belonging to ravens that must draw the attention even of the most incurious — they spend all their leisure time in striking and cuffing each other on the wing in a kind of playful skirmish...
Page 80 - WATER WORKS, for the Supply of Cities and Towns. With a Description of the Principal Geological Formations of England as influencing Supplies of Water ; and Details of Engines and Pumping Machinery for raising Water.
Page 62 - He is also of opinion that if stationary men would pay some attention to the districts on which they reside, and would publish their thoughts respecting the objects that surround them, from such materials might be drawn the most complete county-histories, which are still wanting in several parts of this kingdom, and in particular.
Page 53 - ... noting down ; believing that every pebble holds a treasure, every bud a revelation ; making it a point of conscience to pass over nothing through laziness or hastiness, lest the vision once offered and despised should be withdrawn ; and looking at every object as if he were never to behold it again. Moreover, he must keep himself free from all those perturbations of mind which not only weaken energy, but darken and confuse the inductive faculty ; from haste and laziness, from melancholy, testiness,...
Page 57 - A GOOD ornithologist should be able to distinguish birds by their air, as well as by their colours and shape, on the ground as well as on the wing, and in the bush as well as in the hand. For, though it must not be said that every species of birds has a manner peculiar to itself, yet there is somewhat in most genera at least, that at first sight discriminates them, and enables a judicious observer to pronounce upon them with some certainty.
Page 10 - Pure chalk, of nearly uniform aspect and composition, is met with in a north-west and south-east direction, from the north of Ireland to the Crimea, a distance of about 1140 geographical miles; and in an opposite direction it extends from the south of Sweden to the south of Bordeaux, a distance of about 840 geographical miles.
Page 53 - I am happy to say our race now affords many a fair realization) our perfect naturalist should be strong in body ; able to haul a dredge, climb a rock, turn a boulder, walk all day, uncertain where he shall eat or rest ; ready to face sun and rain, wind and frost, and to eat or drink thankfully anything, however coarse or meagre; he should know how to swim for his life, to pull an oar, sail a boat, and ride the first horse which comes to hand ; and, finally, he should be a thoroughly good shot, and...
Page xlvi - An address delivered at the anniversary meeting of the Geological Society of London, on the 19th of February, 1841 ; and the announcement of the award of the Wollaston medal and donation fund for the same year.
Page 53 - He must be of a reverent turn of mind also; not rashly discrediting any reports, however vague and fragmentary; giving man credit always for some germ of truth, and giving nature credit for an inexhaustible fertility and variety, which will keep him his life long always reverent, yet never superstitious; wondering at the commonest, but not surprised by the most strange ; free from the idols of size and sensuous loveliness; able to see grandeur in the minutest objects, beauty in the most ungainly;...

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