Lands of the Free: Historical Broadcast Series of the NBC Inter-American University of the Air ... Handbook

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National Broadcasting Company, 1852 - America
 

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Page 390 - A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts and nothing long ; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 285 - Camden, most reverend head, to whom I owe All that I am in arts, all that I know (How nothing's that! ), to whom my country owes The great renown and name wherewith she goes...
Page 354 - There needs no more be said to extol the excellence and power of his wit. and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach, viz.
Page 391 - Beggar'd by fools, whom still he found too late; He had his jest, and they had his estate. He laughed himself from court; then sought relief By forming parties, but could ne'er be chief : For, spite of him, the weight of business fell On Absalom and wise Achitophel: Thus, wicked but in will, of means bereft, He left not faction, but of that was left.
Page 271 - Her singular talents for government were founded equally on her temper and on her capacity. Endowed with a great command...
Page 281 - Bacon to be a man plain, direct, and constant, without all finesse and doubleness ; and one that was of the mind that a man in his private proceedings and estate, and in the proceedings of state, should rest upon the soundness and strength of his own courses, and not upon practice to circumvent others...
Page 390 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half -hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repaired with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies...
Page 309 - And if he were not the best king, if he were without some parts and qualities which have made some kings great and happy, no other prince was ever unhappy who was possessed of half his virtues and endowments, and so much without any kind of vice.
Page 326 - He was a very fine gentleman, active, and full of courage, and most accomplished in those qualities of horsemanship, dancing, and fencing, which accompany a good breeding ; in which his delight was. Besides that, he was amorous in poetry and music, to which he indulged the greatest part of his time ; and nothing could...
Page 271 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is scarcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome...

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