The Book of the Farm, Volume 2

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1844 - Agriculture
 

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Page 31 - Now, shepherds, to your helpless charge be kind, Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens With food at will; lodge them below the storm, And watch them strict : for from the bellowing east, In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's wing Sweeps up the...
Page 706 - The careful hen Calls all her chirping family around, Fed and defended by the fearless cock; Whose breast with ardour flames, as on he walks, Graceful, and crows defiance.
Page 220 - Those who have both, seldom have a horse that requires clipping, but, when clipped, he must not want either. A long coat takes up a deal of moisture, and is difficult to dry ; but whether wet or dry, it affords some defence to the skin, which is laid bare to every breath of air when deprived of its natural covering. Every one must know from himself whether wet clothing and a wet skin, or no clothing and a wet skin, is the most disagreeable and dangerous. It is true that clipping saves the groom a...
Page 591 - ... drought, and destitute of all vegetation, except that of a few thistles. A square foot of the dead turf being dug up...
Page 599 - The' innumerous ills that rush around his life ; Mark the quick kite, with beak and talons prone, Circling the skies to snatch him from the plain...
Page 651 - ... applied when chopped small by a proper machine, and kept dry till it is ploughed in for the use of a crop. In this case, though it would decompose much more slowly and produce less effect at first, yet its influence would be much more lasting.
Page 428 - Fled now the sullen murmurs of the North, The splendid raiment of the SPRING peeps forth ; Her universal green, and the clear sky, Delight still more and more the gazing eye.
Page 388 - ... contrast this with the condition of many young men employed as farmservants in the southern counties, who, being paid board-wages, club together to have their comfortless meal cooked in a neighbouring cottage, with no house to call their home, left to sleep in an outhouse or hay-loft, subject to the contamination of idle companions, with no parent's eye to watch their actions and no parent's voice to warn them of their errors ; and say which situation is best calculated to promote domestic comfort,...
Page 706 - Gives out his snowy plumage to the gale ; And, arching proud his neck, with oary feet Bears forward fierce, and guards his osier-isle, Protective of his young.
Page 652 - A slight incipient fermentation is undoubtedly of use in the dunghill ; for by means of it a disposition is brought on in the woody fibre to decay and dissolve, when it is carried to the land, or ploughed into the soil ; and woody fibre is always in great excess in the refuse of the farm.

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