Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great War to the War on Terror

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Harper Collins, Mar 17, 2009 - History - 576 pages

Beginning with the chaotic post-World War I landscape, in which religious belief was one way of reordering a world knocked off its axis, Sacred Causes is a penetrating critique of how religion has often been camouflaged by politics. All the bloody regimes and movements of the twentieth century are masterfully captured here, from Stalin's Soviet Union, Hitler's Germany, Mussolini's Italy, and Franco's Spain through to the modern scourge of terrorism. Eloquently and persuasively combining an authoritative survey of history with a timely reminder of the dangers of radical secularism, Burleigh asks why no one foresaw the religious implications of massive Third World immigration, and he deftly investigates what are now driving calls for a civic religion to counter the terrorist threats that have so shocked the West.

 

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User Review  - VGAHarris - LibraryThing

A potentially good analysis gets mired in author's clear pro-Catholic partisanship and morass of self-absorbed evening scores with other scholars. Read full review

SACRED CAUSES: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great War to the War on Terror

User Review  - Kirkus

Mix monotheisms and mammon, and you have an unholy mess—and the present age.So the reader might conclude after touring British historian Burleigh's continuation of the project begun in Earthly Powers ... Read full review

Contents

Europe after
1
The Totalitarian Political Religions
38
The Churches in the Age of Dictators
123
Apocalypse 19391945
214
Resistance Christian Democracy
284
The Imposition
319
Time of the Toy Trumpets
345
The Northern Ireland
373
The Churches
415
Europe after 911
450
notes
485
picture credits
511
index
535
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About the author (2009)

Michael Burleigh is the author of Earthly Powers, Sacred Causes, and The Third Reich: A New History, which won the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nonfiction. He is married and lives in London.

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