The Eagle of the Ninth

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Oxford University Press, 2000 - Children's stories - 293 pages
One of Rosemary Sutcliff's acclaimed books set in Roman Britain. The Eagle of the Ninth tells the story of a young Roman officer who sets out to discover the truth behind the mysterious disappearance of the Ninth Legion, who marched into the mists of northern Britain and never came back.Rosemary Sutcliff spent most of her life in a wheelchair, suffering from the wasting Still's disease. She wrote her first book for children, The Queen's Story, in 1950 and went on to become a highly respected name in the field of children's literature. She received an OBE in 1975 and died at theage of 72 in 1992.
 

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User Review  - quondame - LibraryThing

Well enough for a mid-20th century book for boys and those interested in Roman Britain. A young man's quest north of Hadrian's wall with his slave turned companion. The close relationship between ex ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - drmaf - LibraryThing

Great to read this classic again after many years. The story of Marcus Aquila and his quest to resurrect the lost 9th Legion Hispana is beautifully written, thoughtful and sympathetic, with honest ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Frontier Fort
1
Feathers in the Wind
13
Attack
26
The Last Rose Falls
40
Saturnalia Games
50
Esca
66
Two Worlds Meeting
80
The Healer with the Knife
91
The Whistler in the Dawn
142
The Lost Legion
157
The Feast of New Spears
174
Venture into the Dark
189
The RingBrooch
208
The Wild Hunt
225
The Waters of Lethe
237
Traduis Gift
252

Tribune Placidus
105
Marching Orders
116
Across the Frontier
133
Valedictory
264
The OliveWood Bird
280
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Rosemary Sutcliff, December 14, 1920 - July 23, 1992 Rosemary Sutcliff was on December 14, 1920 in East Clandon in Surrey. Her father was in the Navy and her mother was a homemaker. As a child she had Stills Disease, a form of juvenile arthritis. The effect of this led to many stays in hospital for painful remedial operations. Due to her fathers postings she moved frequently, living in Malta, Streatham, London, Chatham Dockyard, Sheerness Dockyard and North Devon. Sutcliff did not learn to read until the age of nine. Sutcliff ended her formal education at fourteen, and went to Bideford Art School. She passed the City and Guilds examination, and was advised to make the painting of miniatures her profession. Around the middle of the War, Sutcliff got an urge to write. She felt cramped by the small canvas of miniature painting, and so turned to writing. The first story she could remember writing was "Wild Sunrise," a story about a British chieftain faced with the invasion of the Romans. Not long after the end of the War, Sutcliff wrote a re-telling of Celtic and Saxon legends which she showed to an old friend. He sent them to Oxford University Press (OUP). Although they rejected the manuscript, they requested that she write a version of the Robin Hood Story. Sutcliff finished "The Chronicles of Robin Hood" and sent it to the publishing company. It took eighteen months for the manuscript to be returned to her, during which time she wrote "The Queen Elizabeth Story" and sent it on to OUP as well. It was accepted, and the two books were eventually published in the same year, 1950. Sutcliff wrote her autobiography "Blue Remembered Hills" and often thought of writing another volume of it as she grew older. Her mother died during the 1960s, and Sutcliff and her father moved to Sussex. Despite being increasingly disabled, she travelled abroad and visited Greece. Her father died in the early 1980s. Sutcliff was writing the morning that she died on July 23, 1992. She had completed the second draft of a novel published in 1997 as "Sword Song," with two more works waiting to be published.

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