John Milton and His Times: An Historical Novel

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D. Appleton & Company, 1868 - Great Britain - 308 pages
 

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Page 267 - Before the Sun, Before the Heavens, thou wert, and at the voice Of God, as with a mantle, did'st invest The rising world of waters dark and deep, Won from the void and formless Infinite...
Page 206 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for not without dust and heat.
Page 121 - So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed, And yet anon repairs his drooping head, And tricks his beams, and with new spangled ore Flames in the forehead of the morning sky...
Page 121 - Through the dear might of Him that walked the waves, Where other groves and other streams along, With nectar pure his oozy locks he laves, And hears the unexpressive nuptial song In the blest kingdoms meek of joy and love. There entertain him all the Saints above, In solemn troops, and sweet societies, That sing, and singing in their glory move, And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes.
Page 268 - Thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine...
Page 104 - Impostor ! do not charge most innocent Nature, As if she would her children should be riotous With her abundance : she, good cateress, Means her provision only to the good, That live according to her sober laws, And holy dictate of spare temperance.
Page 121 - Fed the same flock by fountain, shade, and rill. Together both, ere the high lawns appeared Under the opening eyelids of the morn...
Page 121 - And all their echoes, mourn: The willows and the hazel copses green Shall now no more be seen Fanning their joyous leaves to thy soft lays : — As killing as the canker to the rose, Or taint-worm to the weanling herds that graze, Or frost to flowers, that their gay wardrobe wear When first the white-thorn blows; Such, Lycidas, thy loss to shepherd's ear.
Page 279 - Absolute rule ; and hyacinthine locks Round from his parted forelock manly hung Clustering, but not beneath his shoulders broad : She, as a veil down to the slender waist, Her unadorned golden tresses wore Dishevelled, but in wanton ringlets waved, As the vine curls her tendrils — which implied Subjection, but required with gentle sway, And by her yielded, by him best received, Yielded with coy submission, modest pride, 310 And sweet, reluctant, amorous delay.
Page 186 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me...

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