The Ballad Minstrelsy of Scotland: Romantic and Historical. With Notes and Introduction on the Ballad Poetry of Scotland

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Bell and Daldy, 1871 - Ballads - 656 pages

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Page 58 - When word came to the carline wife That her sons she'd never see. "I wish the wind may never cease, Nor fashes in the flood, Till my three sons come hame to me In earthly flesh and blood!" It fell about the Martinmas, When nights are lang and mirk, The carline wife's three sons came hame, And their hats were o
Page 309 - For I'm weary wi hunting, and fain wald lie down." " OI fear ye are poisond, Lord Randal, my son! OI fear ye are poisond, my handsome young man!
Page 372 - O where will I get a gude sailor, To take my helm in hand, Till I get up to the tall topmast, To see if I can spy land?' 'O here am I, a sailor gude, To take the helm in hand, Till you go up to the tall topmast, But I fear you'll ne'er spy land.
Page 376 - Ercildoune, a person came running in, and told, with marks of fear and astonishment, that a hart and hind had left the neighbouring forest, and were, composedly and slowly, parading the street of the village. The prophet instantly arose, left his habitation, and followed the wonderful animals to the forest, whence he was never seen to return. According to the popular belief, he still "drees his weird" in Fairy Land, and is one day expected to revisit earth.
Page 430 - And he that had a bonnie boy, Sent out his horse to grass, And he that had not a bonnie boy, His ain servant he was. But up then spake a little page, Before the peep of dawn: 'O waken ye, waken ye, my good lord, For Percy's hard at hand.
Page 370 - O whare will I get a skeely skipper, To sail this new ship of mine?' O up and spake an eldern knight, Sat at the King's right knee, 'Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor That ever sailed the sea.
Page 30 - Rise up, rise up, my seven bold sons, And put on your armour so bright ; And take better care of your youngest sister, For your eldest's awa
Page 561 - Where be ye gaun, ye broken men?' Quo' fause Sakelde ; 'come tell to me!' Now Dickie of Dryhope led that band, And the never a word o' lear had he. 'Why trespass ye on the English side? Row-footed outlaws, stand !
Page 57 - There lived a wife at Usher's well, And a wealthy wife was she; She had three stout and stalwart sons. And sent them o'er the sea.
Page 372 - Wi' the auld moon in her arm ; And if we gang to sea, master, I fear we'll come to harm." They hadna sailed a league, a league, A league but barely three, When the lift grew dark, and the wind blew loud, And gurly grew the sea. The ankers brak, and the top-masts lap, It was sic a deadly storm ; And the waves cam o'er the broken ship, Till a

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