The Rudiments of Latin and English Grammar: Designed to Facilitate the Study of Both Languages, by Connecting Them Together

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Thomas & Andrews, 1812 - Latin language - 302 pages
 

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Page 187 - The prepositions in, sub, super, and subter, govern the accusative, when motion to a place is signified; but when motion or rest in a place is signified, in and sub govern the ablative, super and subter either the accusative or ablative.
Page 268 - The Colon, or member, is a chief constructive part, or greater division of a sentence. The Semicolon, or half member, is a less constructive part, or subdivision, of a sentence or member.
Page 264 - Waller was smooth ; but Dryden taught to join The varying verse, the full resounding line, The long majestic march, and energy divine : Though still some traces of our rustic vein And splay-foot verse remain'd, and will remain.
Page 79 - Shall, on the contrary, in the first person, simply foretells; in the second and third persons, promises, commands, or threatens...
Page 198 - If the substantives be of different persons, the verb plural must agree with the first person rather than the second, and with the second rather than the third ; as...
Page 263 - For wheresoe'er I turn my ravish'd eyes, gay gilded scenes and shining prospects rise, poetic fields encompass me around, and still I seem to tread on classic ground...
Page 56 - ADJECTIVES are either of the first and second declension, or of the third only...
Page 197 - If no nominative come between the relative and the verb, the relative will be the nominative to the verb. But if a...
Page 240 - Thus le in l!f<i is said to be short by authority, because it is always made short by the Latin poets. In most Latin words of one or two syllables, according to our manner of pronouncing, we can hardly distinguish by the ear a long syllable from a short. Thus le in ligo and ligi seem tn It...
Page 1 - In Latin there are as many syllables in a word, as there are vowels or diphthongs in it ; unless when...

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