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(Jan.
light bandage, embroidered with
e feathers of the eagle, and this
as the sole garment she had on,
ave that her head was ornamented
-ith a beautiful diadem of heron's
lumes. She was so young, so art-
ess, and so ravishingly beautiful

,
hat she took my heart captive at the
first glance. I had at that time only
twelve wives, selected by the re-
gent from my own peculiar tribe,
but several other nations bad for
some time been importuning me to
choose a score or two of consorts
from the loveliest of their maid-
ens, and I had for some reason or
other delayed complying with their
requests. But now I was resolved
to marry the whole nation, so as to
secure this most beautiful of her sex.

Alas! was it not madness thus to
3 give way to these tender emotions,

when the first word she uttered con-
veyed to me the appalling certainty

that she was daughter of my dead-
| liest foe-of the very being whom it
- had been the sole object of my edu-
y cation to enable me to drink to
i death! But a second look at the elt-

rooma Aitted towards us with the rooma -- what is she but
cocoa bowl. I retained her hand in flower, which will be too
mine, and gazed upon her with an honoured by being transplan
expression in my glances, that suffi- the gardens of the might
ciently betrayed the interest she ex molla?'
cited in my heart. She did not seem “ In pursuance of this res
displeased with my admiration, but the noble Sisquo Dumfki a
hung down her head and blushed, every appearance of total ine
with such bewitching innocence and he hiccuped, sang,
beauty, as rendered her a thousand finally sank down in a state
times more enchanting in my eyes rent insensibility. I confes
than ever. When we had now drank astonished at the absence of
unceasingly for three days, I said to rooma on this interesting oc
my opponent, • It grieves me, o She came not near to cover
Sisquo Dumfki, that this contest ther with skins or leaves, a
must be carried on to the death. duty was left to me of castin
Even if you are victorious in this him the royal mantle, and to
trial, as sixteen years ago you were his feet towards the fire. W
with my illustrious parent, you have expressive grasp of the hand,
no chance of escaping with your life. him to provide for his safety; f
I myself, till I became acquainted mother, I was well aware,
with your noble sentiments, thirsted take every means in her pow
for your blood; and now that I know put him to death in revenge f
you all that a chief should be, my victory over her husband. On
soul is tortured with regret that it ing from the tent, I was hailed »
will be impossible to save you. by ten thousand voices; the w
With an unmoved countenance the combined nations which owned
hero heard me declare, as it were, sway, seemed delirious with
his condemnation to certain death. triumph I had achieved. No
He drained off the bowl which he queror returning from a succes
happened to have in his hand, and expedition, with the imperial
replied, “Death comes only once purpled to a deeper die with
the Great Spirit rejoices in the ac- blood of thousands of his subje
tions of majestic men.

There are was ever received with such an
casine and tobacco in Elysium. thusiasm of attachment. Cal
But I was resolved, if possible, to pre- aside the captain of my guarı
serve my friend from the destruc- gave him the strictest injunctions
tion prepared for him by my mo allow no one to enter the tent
ther. Sisquo,' I said, 'let us delay which my illustrious competitor
the conclusion of our contest till posed, and proceeded to the wigw
some fitter opportunity. If you of the queen. She was smok
would save your life, and make me when I entered; and the clou
the happiest of kings and of mortals, which circled round her head, ga
pretend to be overcome by the ca to her piercing black eyes the lil
sine, and ask to be left in this tent to ness of two brilliant stars shining
sleep. I will place round it a body a lowering heaven.
of my own guards, with orders to «« He is dead ?' she said; ‘my s
prevent all emissaries from the would scarcely venture into the pi
queen from entering it under pain sence of his mother if the murder
of death. In the mean time I will of his father was left aliye.'
wed your daughter, if it seems good “No, my mother,' I replied, '1
to you; and when by this means you is sunk in deep sleep, and we a
are connected with the royal house, sufficiently revenged by having coi
your life will become sacred, even quered at his own weapons the hei
from the vengeance of an offended of the Chicasaws.'
woman.'

' li seems good to me, “He sleeps !-'tis well. It sha he replied, 'O mightiest potentate be my care to see that he neve on Alatamaha's banks; and well awakes - the tomahawk in a wo pleased shall I resign the victory to man's hand, is as sure as a poisonou you, in hopes of concluding a whole drug in the bowl-for, mark me week with you on soine future op- Quinmolla, no powers can persuadı portunity. With regard to Nem- me, that the glorious Atta-kull-kull

,

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1- chanting girl made me forgetful of

every feeling of revenge. I spoke
to her--I found her soft

, sweet, de
1- lightful,-a daughter of the pathless
e foresty-stately as the loftiest pains

that waved their plumed heads in d grandeur to the sky, and pure as the : spiral ophrys, with its snow-white e flowers, which blossoms so tenderly

at their feet. Her name was Nem-
! rooma, which in your language

means the spotless' lily-mine, 1
must inform you, was Quinmolla

,
the drinker of rum."

Here the youngman paused, and ? sighed deeply. I confess I was in I tensely interested by the manner in

which he related his story; the tra1 veller to whom he addressed him

self, was apparently fascinated by

the wild beauty of his eyes; for the
· beef still lay untasted before hin,

and he could not remove his looks
even for a moment, from the coun-
tenance of the Indian king.
feast was at last prepared,” he con
tinued, and Sisquo Dumfki and
myself were placed in conspicuous
situations, but still far enough re«
moved from the spectators to have
our conversation private. We drank;
and every time the casine hogshead

mnienished, the lovely Nem.

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met with fair treatment at the hand cruelty, you shall dearly pay for
of his rival at the feast. Have I tot. this. Ere the palm-trees are gilded
seen him often and often drink not seven times with the morning and
only for five days, but for weeks and evening suns, expect my return, and
months together, and start up from to suffer for your crimes.'
his debauch as fresh as if he had been “I rushed into the open air as I
bathing in the warrior's streams in spoke, and leaving tents, wigwams,
the shadowy land ? Tell me, my son, friends, and subjects far behind me,
that Sisquo Dumfki has for the last 1 darted into the thickest of the
time seen the light of day.'

forest, and pursued my way to å “I cannot,' I replied; ‘it goes winding of the river, where I kept a against my soul. He trusts me- canoe constantly prepared for my why should I be faithless as the fishing expeditions. In it I found a hyena or the white men !-No, mo- supply of provisions, my rods, and ther, let him live, for my spirit burns lines; my war-club, and my bow with admiration of the beautiful with poisoned arrows. I embarked, Nemrooma.

and pushing out into the middle of “The feather in thy hair was torn the stream, I pursued my way as surely from the pigeon's wing, and raidly as I could, in hopes of overnot the eagle's. What! hast thou no taking the beautiful Nemrooma, or fear of the wrath of your father, perhaps of seeing her on the bank, if whose form I often see gloomily re she should have been fortunate posing beneath the shadow of the enough to swim to land. I kept my stately palm-tree which he loved the eyes intently fixed on every bend of most-fearest thou not, that rushing the stream, in case her canoe should from the land of spirits, he blasts thee have been stranded, but in vain. All to the earth, with the sight of those that day I kept on my course, and befrowning brows, which no mortal gan to fear that ere I could overtake can look upon and live ? Away! thou her, she would be carried down to a art unworthy of the blood of a thou- bluff in the river, which we had callsand forest kings, who, long ere we ed Crocodile Island, and in that case removed to these plains, reigned on I knew there was no hope of her safethe shores of the eternal Sire of Ri- ty. How peacefully, 0 Alatamaha, vers;* and unworthier still, since you glided thy glorious expanse of waprefer your love to your revenge, of ters, bearing the vast shadows of the the ancestry of the Milesian lords, umbrageous oaks upon their bosom, the O'Flaherties of the Tipperary while thy banks were made vocal by wilds.'- I stood astonished at this the music of unnumbered birds! torrent of indignation, but my rage Little did such a scene of placid was at length roused as she proceed- beauty accord with the tumultuous ed, Newrooma! and what seest throbbings of Nemrooma's agonized thou in that paltry girl to wean thee breast. I thought what must have from the nobler passion of venge- been her feelings while floating ance ? But cease to cherish fantastic past those magniticent scenes, clothhopes-the setting sun of yesterday ed with all the verdure of luxuriant went down upon her death.' nature, and enlivened with the glit

“What! hast thou dared to blight tering plumage of the various people the lily which I intended to carry in of the skies, which glanced for a momy bosom-how? when? where? ment across her like glimpses of

"'The Alatamaha is broad and sunsbine, and then fitted once more deep,' replied my mother, “a canoe into the shadows of the woods. The is trail and slighi-ill may a maiden's banks were also ornamented with arm contend with an impetuous banging garlands and bowers, formriver. Alone in a fragile barkmun- ed, as it were, for the retreat of the used to the paddle-she was floated river divinities, of the most beautiful down the stream.'

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and

shrubs and plants. And here and “ « Wretch,' Iexclaimed, losing all there the eye was delighted with the respect for her dignity, in the rage large white Howers of the ipomea, surthai seized me on account of her rounded with its dark-green leaves.

Som foldi

The lour face with the

bot 1101

• Mississippi-Father of Rivers.

sland.

[Jan. ruelty, you shall dearly pay for his. Ere the palm-trees are gilded even times with the morning and evening suns, expect my return, and co suffer for your crimes.'

" I rushed into the open air as 1 spoke, and leaving tents, wigwaras, friends, and subjects far behind me, 1 darted into the thickest of the forest, and pursued my way to a winding of the river, where I kept a canoe constantly prepared for my fishing expeditions in it I found a supply of provisions, my rods, and lines; my war-club, and my bow with poisoned arrows. I embarked, and pushing out into the middle of the stream, I pursued my way as raidly as I could, in hopes of overtaking the beautiful Nemrooma, or perhaps of seeing her on the bank, if she should have been fortunate enough to swim to land. I kept my

“ But all these enchanting sights sedges at the shore. The conqu were insufficient to divert mythoughts now directed his course to the from the probable fate of the beauti noe. He raised his head and s) ful Nemrooma. All night I plied my ders out of the water, and pu course, and, on the morning, could his little short paws into the boa still discover no trace either of the overturned it in an instant, and, girl or her canoe. About noon, I was few moments, fragments of it made aware, by the extraordinary swimming about in all direct sounds which saluted my ears from When Neinrooma saw the ho a distance, that I was approaching scene, she clung convulsively to the Crocodile lagoon. luspired by arm, and in some degree impe fresh anxiety to overtake her, if pos- my efforts to effect our escape sible, before entering on that fear cautioned her to be still, and pus fulscene, I plied my utmost strength, with all my force towards the and, at a bending of the river, was trance of the river out of the lago rewarded for all my labours and But, alas ! fortune was here aga anxiety, by a view of the tender us. It was the time at which myri bark only a short way in front. Be- upon myriads of fish take their cou fore I could place myself at her side up the river; and, as the stream we had entered the dreadful lake, shallowest at this place, the cro and the placid water was broken into diles had chosen it as their posit a thousand ripples by the countless to intercept their prey. The wh multitudes of the alligators which water, for miles on each side, see inhabited the place. The noise they ed alive with fish. The line of cro made was of the most appalling de- diles extended from shore to sho scription. Terrified at the perilous and it was the most horrific sigh situation in which she was placed, ever witnessed, to see them da the lovely girl uttered a scream of into the broken ranks of the fi joy when she saw me, and had only and grind in their prodigious jaw self-possession enough to step from multitude of the largest trouts, who her own canoe into mine, when she tails flapped about their mouths a fell down in a state of insensibility, eyes, ere they had swallowed the from the violence of her contending The horrid noise of their closi feelings. No sooner was her frail jaws-their rising with their pre bark deserted, than it became the some feet upright above the water object of a fearful battle to the mon the floods of foam and blood rushi. sters of the deep. A crocodile of out of their mouths, and the cloue prodigious size rushed towards the of vapour issuing from their di canoe from the reeds and high grass tended nostrils, were truly horrif at the bank. His enormous body ing. Anxious to escape, I now b swelled ; his plaited tail, brandished gan to paddle towards the shore high, floated upon the lagoon. The the lagoon, in order to land and wa waters, like a cataract, descended till the army of fish bad forced the from his open jaws. Clouds of smoke passage, after which, I concluded, issued from his nostrils. The earth would be easier for us to elude the trembled with his thunder. But im- satiated monsters; but ere we ha mediately from the opposite side a got half way across the lake, I per rival champion emerged from the ceived we were pursued by two deep. They suddenly darted upon an unusual size. From these escap each other. The boiling surface of by flight was impossible. They ra the lake marked their rapid course, pidly gained upon us, and at last on and a terrific conflict commenced. of them, raising himself out of the Sometimes they sank to the bottom, water, was just preparing to lay hi folded together in horrid wreaths. paw upon the canoe, when I dis The water became thick and disco- charged an arrow, which luckil loured. Again they rose to the sur- pierced his eye. With a roar of min face, and their jaws clapt together gled rage and pain, he sank below with a noise that echoed through the water, and left me to prepare the surrounding forest. Again they for the assault of his companion sank, and the contest ended at the With a tremendous cry, he came upbottom of the lake; the vanquished and darted as swift as an arrow unmonster making his escape to the der my boat, emerging upright on

e eyes intently fixed on every bend of 5 the stream, in case her canoe should

have been stranded, but in vain. All e that day I kept on my course, and be al gan to fear that ere i could ørertake u her, she would be carried down to a

bluff in the river, which we had calle ed Crocodile Island, and in that case n I knew there was no hope of her safeį ty. How peacefully, 0 Alatamaha, u glided thy glorious expanse of waif ters, bearing the vast shadows of the 3, umbrageous oaks upon their bosoiu, y while thy banks were made vocal by is the music of unnumbered birds! e Little did such a scene of placid to beauty accord with the tumultuous st throbbings of Newrooma's agonized

breast. I thought what must bare e been her feelings while floating ic past those magnificent scenes, clothy

ed with all the verdure of luxuriant

nature, and enlivened with the glitattering plumage of the various people in of the skies, which glanced for a mo.

ment across her like glimpses of id sunshine, and then flitted once more re into the shadows of the woods. The 's banks were also ornamented with 8 hanging garlands and bowers, forailo ed, as it were, for the retreat of the driver divinities, of the most beautiful

shrubs and plants. And here and I there the eye was deligbted with the

Jarge white flowers of the ipomea, suro i rounded with its dark-green leares.

>

my lee-quarter, with open jaws, and “ I assist you ?” said the traveller, belching water and smoke, that fell “how is that possible ?”. upon me like rain in a hurricane. “ Coach is quite ready, sir,” interLeaving the bow to the skilful Nem- rupted the waiter. rooma, I seized my club, and beat « The fact is,” rejoined the young him about the head, and kept him for man, “ I have just got to that point, a few minutes at a distance. I saw, in a tale I ain writing for next however, he was making prepara- month's Blackwood, and curse me if tions for his final spring, his mouth I know how to get naturally away was opened to a fearful width, when from the Crocodile Island.” an arrow struck him directly on the “ Coach can't wait another motongue, and pinned it to his jaw. ment, sir," said the waiter; “ supHe shouted as he felt the pain, and per, two and sixpence.darted off, no doubt, in quest of “ Supper !” exclaimed the travel. assistance. I shot to the bank with ler, “this d-d fellow with his cockthe speed of lightning, lifted the al- and-a-bull story, about being king of most fainting Nemrooma from the the jackdaws, or kickshaws, or Lord canoe, and led her to the foot of an knows what, has kept me from eatimmense magnolia, which I perceived ing a morsel.” at no great distance. Before we left “ Coachman can't wait a moment, the river, however, we saw a prodi. sir.” gious number of crocodiles gathered " I tell you I haven't tasted a round the boat, and one of them even mouthful since I left Birmingham.” crawled into it, and we heard our “ You can't help me to a plan for last hope of safety take its leave in getting the young people off the the crash of its breaking sides, as it island ?" said the youth. crumbled into fragments beneath the “ May the devil catch both of unwieldy monster's weight. The them, and a hundred crocodiles eat shore, I was aware, was also the re- every bone in their skins !” sort of incredible multitudes of “ Two and sixpence for supper, bears. Our provisions were exhaust. sir," said the waiter. ed, our arrows left in the canoe, and “Two hundred and sixty devils we could see no possibility of avoid first,” cried the traveller in a proing an excruciating death.” The digious passion, buttoning up his narrator here stopt for a moment, cloak and preparing to resume his and the traveller, breathless with in- journey-_" let that infernal Indian terest, said to him, “ For God's sake, king, who is only some lying scribtell me, sir, how you got safe off ?” bler in a magazine, pay for it bim

Whilst the stranger prepared to re- self, for I'm hanged if he hasn't ply, I took advantage of the pause to cheated me out of my cold beef, and look round the room. The supper drank every drop of my porter to table was deserted. The passengers the bargain." had all paid their reckoning, and the “ All right, gentlemen," said the waiter was standing expectingly at coachman in the yard. the corner of the sideboard.

“ All right,” replied the guard; “ How we got safe off ?” replied “tsh! tsh! ya! hip-ts! ts !-and the Indian chief; “ that's just the the half-famished outside passenger thing that puzzles me, and I thought was whirled along Corn Market, and you might perhaps be able to assist over Magdalen Bridge, at the rate of me.”

eleven miles an hour.

THE SIEGE OF ANTWERP.

BY LADY EMMELINE STUART WORTLEY.

Island.

I assist you ?” said the traveller, “ how is that possible?"

“ Coach is quite ready, sir," interrupted the waiter.

* The fact is,” rejoined the young man, “ I have just got to that point, in a tale I ain writing for next mouth’s Blackwood, and curse me if

I know how to get naturally away
į from the Crocodile Island.”

“ Coach can't wait another mo-
ment, sir,” said the waiter; “ sup-
d per, two and sixpence.”
“Supper!” exclaimed the travel

.
hler, “this d-d fellow with his cock-
il- and-a-bull story, about being king of
ve the jackdaws, or kickshaws, or Lord
in knows what, has kept me from eat-
ed ing a morsel."

« Coachman can't wait a moment,

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die sir."

“ I tell you I haven't tasted a
ven mouthful since I left Birmingham."
our You can't help me to a plan for
2 in getting the young people of the
Bit island ?" said the youth.

“ May the devil catch both of
The them, and a hundred crocodiles eat
re- every bone in their skins !"

of “ Two and sixpence for supper,
ust- sir," said the waiter.
ind « Two hundred and sixty devils
sid. first,cried the traveller in a pro-
The digious passion, buttoning up his
ent, cloak and preparing to resume his
in- journeym" let that infernal lodian
ske, king, who is only some lying scris

bler in a magazine, pay for it big-
re- self, for l’m hanged' if he hasn's
2 to cheated me out of my cold beef, and

drank every drop of my porter to
fore the bargain."
the

" All right, gentlemen," said the
coachman in the yard.

All right,replied the guard; ied

ish! tsh! ya! hip-ts! ts!"the the half-famished outside passenge! was whirled along Corn Market

, and sist over Magdalen Bridge, at the rate of

eleven miles an hour.

Once more the fierce artillery
Shakes the pale earth and rends the sky;
The howitzers their harvests reap-
Their jubilee the cannon keep.
The sulphurous gloom-the thunderous crash,
Burst round-while warrior-weapons clash !
Still rooted to their guns they stand,
They of the unswerving heart and hand;
Those heroes of a parrow'd field,
Who cannot quail,- who will not yield !
Well may ye stand as mountains there,
Ye lions, on your frowning lair ;
Ye proud defenders of a trust,
That shall not crumble into dust;
Or if ye stand-or if you fall-
Famous ye must be, and ye shall;
For if ye fall that citadel,
Your arms defended long and well,
Shall give to ye—the True and Brave,
The Soldiers most Majestic Grave!
Ye shall be honour'd, glorious band !
Breathing Palladium of your land.
But may ye fall not !-though before
Your walls streams forth the Tricolor !
(Which still retains its rainbow'd hues,
Though steep'd so oft in crimsoning dews
Which still its ray of white retains,
Though darken’d by so many stains !)
Though France's leaguering hosts be there,
Where is their conquering Eagle? Where!
Who led them in all triumph on
From shore to shore--from throne to throne ?
That Eagle's stormward flight is done!
And set for him is Victory's Sun!

Where England's winged leviathans,
And England's ocean-veterans ?
The hurricanes against them rose,
As erst against their scattered foes,
When the Armada of proud Spain
Tbreaten’d the Sea-Kings with the chain,
Like Xerxes' fetters, doom'd to prove
Vain, as of flax and frost-work wove;
Then gird ye for the lengthen'd fight,
And Victory, Victory be with right!
Though pent in your bastion'd den of war,
Scanping your armed foes from afar,
Ye! whose stern bosoms proudly beat,
Those foes with clashing swords to greet !
But though the sword be sheath'd, the shell
Can do its work of slaughter well.
Hark! how the city's ribs of stone,
And old foundations seem to groan,
As on the thickening tempest sweeps,

With sound of heavy-rushing deeps.
VOL. XXXII. XO. CCIII.

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