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she is willing submissively to endure humus, thy head, which now is her lot. “ Leaving so his service!" growing upon thy shoulders, shall not till with her own fingers she had within this hour be off ; thy mistress helped to dig her master's grave! enforced; thy garments cut to pieces That done, and he buried, “I follow before thy face; and all this done, you, so please you entertain me.” spurn her home to her father, who The warrior bids her “be cheerful may, haply, be a little angry for and wipe her eyes ;” and we can such rough usage.” The game of believe that Imogen obeys one half heads is one that two can play at; of the injunction that she does and Guiderius was first in hand. “ wipe her eyes;” but as to being But why did not Cloten” enforce “cheerful,” never more may a smile his mistress" when she was lying in visit for a moment that beautiful his bosom? Beyond all credibility, she countenance-though Lucius, look- laid herself down in her loveliness ing on it, may believe that his page even within his very arms. But his is happy. To him she is but Fidele; courage was cooled-oh! the craven to us-Imogen.

-and he offered not to take even the It is wonderful how our pity is most innocent little liberty with her never impaired by our knowledge, peerless person. There was some all the while, that the corpse is not excuse for his frigidity—why ?-for that of Posthumus but Cloten's. Per. he had lost not only his heart but his haps we forget that it is so; assured. head. 'Tis a pretty piece of retribuly there is no interruption given to tive justice. our sympathy; we partake in the "Like a glory from afar, like a reappearsame delusion, which is only dispel.

. ing star," led at last, to our great relief, by the last words of Lucius,

Imogen shews herself, at the close “ Some falls are mcans the happier to

of this “strange eventful history,"

in Cymbeline's tent. A gallant comarise."

pany, Cymbeline, Belarius, GuideIt was just the same with our feel. rius, Arviragus, Pisanio the faithful, ings for Imogen herself in the forest- lords, officers, and attendants, Corcave. The young princes believed nelius the physician and ladies, Luher dead--and we, though we knew cius, Iachimo, the soothsayer and she was but in a swoon, believed so other Roman prisoners guarded, and too — almost sufficiently for any behind Posthumus and Imogen. A amount of sorrow. The thought that burst of sunshine brightens a day of Fidele was not dead but sleeping, storm. There are glorious revelawas so dim, that it marred not the tions. emotions with which we beheld her , funeral rites, and heard the dirge

" Griderius. This is sure Fidele! chanted, to tbe scattering over her

Imog. to Posth. Why did you throw fair body of leaves and flowers.

your wedded lady from you? Poor Cloten! He must have been

Think, that you are upon a rock; and now a fineanimal, to be mistaken, a head.

! Throw me again. (Embracing him. ] Belarius.

I, old Morgan, less trunk, for Posthumus. He met

Am that Belarius whom you sometime with scurvy usage in the forest. Guia

banished: derius treated bim rather unceremo

Mighty sir, niously, after hunter's fashion.

These two young gentlemen, that call me " Re-enter Guiderius with Cloten's head.

father, This Cloten was a fool; an empty purse,

And think they are my sons, are none of There was no inoney in't: not Hercules

mine; Could bave knock'd out his brains, for he They are the issue of your loins, my liege, had none."

And blood of your begeiting. " Re-enter Guiderius.

Cymbeline. O Imogen ! I have sent Cloten's clotroll down the Thou hast lost by this a kingdom! stream,

Imogen.

No, my lord; In embassy to his mother; his body's I have got two worlds by't. -0 my hostage

gentle brothers, For his return."

Have we thus met? O never say here.

after, But what took him so far from home, But I am truest speaker : you call’d me and into such salvage places ? “Post brother,

of

ics of Women. No, II.

(Feb. ure humus, thy head, which now is e!” growing upon thy shoulders, shall had within this hour be off ; tby mistress ve! enforced; thy garments cut to pieces low before thy face; and all this done, ne."

spurn her home to her father, who rful may, haply, be a little angry for can such rough usage.” The game half beads is one that two can play at; Toes and Guiderius was first in hand. eing But why did not Cloten “enforce mile his mistress” when she was lying in ciful bis bosom? Beyond all credibility, she pok- laid herself down in her loveliness age even within his very arms. But his ele; courage was cooledmob ! the craren

and he offered not to take eren the
y is most innocent little liberty with ber
dge, peerless person. There was some
not excuse for his frigidity-why-for
Per- he had lost not only his heart but his
red- head. 'Tis a pretty piece of retribu

to tive justice.
the
"Like a glory from afar, like a reappear-

ing star,
the

of this "strange eventful history," r to

in Cymbeline's tent. A gallant com

-ge Imogą to Posth. Why did you throw ner 6

pel

When I was but your sister; I you bro. heavens are mute. The offended thers,

majesty of the Sicilian Queen simuWhen you were so indeed.

lates death, and seeks a living tombCymbeline. The forlorn soldier, that

The persecuted simplicity of the so nobly fought,

British Princess takes refuge from He would have well becomed this place, her lord's injustice in a cave of the and graced

forest. After many long silent years, The thankings of a king.

Hermione descends, a living statue Posthumus.

I am, sir,

from its pedestal, and receives her The soldier that did company these three

husband into her forgiveness. A few In poor beseeming."

weeks (or but days ?) of wild and Cloten, being a high-born clown, woeful wandering brings Imogen to had honourable death and honour

the royal tent, and to the bosom of able burial. The Queen is dead the once more loyal Leonatus. Per“ with horror madly dying, like her dita, a new star, rises in the Sicilian life," --and there is happy ending. skies--and Guiderius and Arviragus, "Cymbeline.

new twin-stars, are bright in that of Laud we the gods;

Britain.
And let our crooked smokes climb to

As nowhere else in all poetry do
their nostrils
From our blessed altars !"'

we so sweetly feel “ that lowly

shepherd's life is best," as in the The “ Winter's Tale” and “Cym- pastoral picture of Florizel and Perbeline," affect us with the same kind dita, so nowhere else in all poetry do of interest. They are kindred crea we so strongly feel the “high life of tions," alike, but, oh! how differ a hunter," as when we behold those ent !" They are the two most de princely boys, Guiderius and Arviralightful drainas in the whole world. gus, bounding along the silvan rocks. Add to them, “As you like it,” “ The But turn we now to take another Midsummer Night's Dream,” and farewell look of Desdemona and Cor. “ The Tempest," and you have the delia. Planetary Five," whom all eyes

gentle Desdemona, too,” may worship

like Imogen, wedded without her But the "Winter's Tale” and father's consent or knowledge; so we

Cymbeline" do each other the believe did Juliet, so did Jessica, and most resemble--beginning, middle, so fain would Perdita have done, and end--and their spirit is beauty. and mayhap, had Prospero been un

In each the story opens in a court reasonable, even Miranda. Shak-courts of no common character speare is a dangerous author to young the Sicilian and the British-but at ladies who are not orphans. Yet no given era-or if given, obscurely what else could the poor dear innoand uncertainly; as if no chronology cent affectionate loving young creahad been kept, and history were tures do ? Brabantio, that surly old not even so much as an “old alma licenser of the press, would never nack!"

have given his imprimatur to an Hermione and Imogen are both of essay on marriage by the Moor. royal statema queen and a princess. That's flat. Nobody knew that better Both are wedded; but the one is a than his own daughter-and nature mother and a matron,--the other, never told the “ gentle Desdemona" though a bride, looks still as if a vir- to keep all her gentleness for her giu. But Hermione had once been sire. None of the “ wealthy curled of as delicate, as fragile form as Imo- darlings of our nation” had taken her gen, and Imogen in a few years will fancy, Ler feelings, or her heart; but be as stately and dignified as Her- Brabantio, though right in calling her

“tender, fair, and happy," was wrong Both are suspected-believed by in affirming that her indifference to their lords, to be guilty of incon them proved her to be “ opposite to tinence-though pure as unfallen marriage." Iago grossly calls Othello snow in its white cloud in heaven. "a black ram,” Brabantio speaks with Hermione appeals to the supernal disgust of his “sooty bosom,” and powers, and an oracle proclaims her mine Ancient afterwards, in Cyprus, innocence. Imogen has fallen on again sarcastically speaks of the still more evil times and for her the "Black Othello." All that is very

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pany, Cymbeline, Belarius, Guide eel. rius, Arviragus, Pisanio the faithful, est- lords, officers, and attendants, Cor. ced nelius the physician and ladies, Luelcius, lachimo, the soothsayer and

other Roman prisoners guarded, and ny behind Posthumus and Imogen. A hat burst of sunshine brightens a day of ng, storm. There are glorious rerelathe tions.

Guiderius. This is sure Fidele!

ner

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your wedded lady from you? Think, that you are upon a rock; and not en Throw me again.

[Embracing hinu? Belarius.

1, old Morgan, Am that Belarius whom you sometime

banished:

Mighty sir,
These two young gentlemen, that call me

father,
And think they are my sons, are none of

mine;
They are the issue of your loins, my liege,
And blood of your begetting.

Cymbeline. O Imogen!
Thou hast lost by this a kingdom !
Imogen.

No, my lord; I have got two torlds by't.- O my

gentle brothers, Have we thus met? O never say here

after, Nut I am truest speaker : you call'd me

well. But not only did Desdemona the kingly line of Gebel el Tuaric. see “ Othello's visage in his mind," For how many hundred years did but his complexion, as long as he the Moors keep marrying-or worse kept his temper, does not appear to Spanish ladies in the Peninsula ? have been generally thought repul- The“ gentle Desdemona," then, sive. People at large who knew him stands acquitted of all blame, in every express no surprise or astonishment court of conscience, and honcur, and at hearing that the noble general had taste in Europe. But Othello was a married a beautiful white wife modest man, and had within him the even the “divine" Desdemona. The germs of fear, and doubt, and jeafairest women are seen every day lousy, which, under the infusion of marrying what must always seem to the bitter waters of suspicion poured us the ugliest men, and for love, or upon them by the diabolical cunning if not for love, for hatred--a still and malignity of Iago, expanded into more unaccountable case. Nor had a huge hideous flower ten times those ugliest men—as far as we ever blacker than the “ sooty bosom” in heard-seen the “ Anthropophagi, which that deadly nightshade grew and men whose heads do grow be. -and thence distraction, delirium, neath their shoulders," nor could danger, despair, and death. the most eloquent of them have de- Desdemona was truly a Character livered a speech, composed for the of Affection-but of passion too—and occasion by a literary friend, half as likewise of imagination. In her nalong as Othello's, in the Council ture affection was predominant-and Chamber, even with the assistance she was purest of the pure. But she of copious notes on a paper that, if would not “ be left behind, a moth observed, might appear to be the of peace,”-an unenjoyed bride. lining of his hat. Where is the won

" If he go to the war, der, then, of that happening once on a

The rites for which I love him are detime in Venice, which is perpetually

nied me;" happening, without one circumstance of alleviation, in London, and Man- and she blushes not-nor needed she chester, and Liverpool, and Birming- to blush-in making that avowal in ham, and Bristol, and Edinburgh, and the face of the senate. That was Glasgow (we know a case in Paisley), passion-hallowed passion. And witnamely, that an ugly elderly gentle- ness their meeting after the storm in man wins, woos, and wears a beauti. Cyprus :ful young lady, fresh and fair from a boarding school, and an adept, Oth. O my fair warrior ! though a novice “ in house affairs ?

Des.

My dear Othello ? But in good truth Othello was the Oth. It gives me wonder great as my finest man of his time-the Captain

content, of the Venetian Six-Feet Club.' He To see you here before me. O my soul's was yet in his prime-that is, “ some

joy! what declined into the vale of years, If after every tempest come such calms, but that not much.” No strong. May the winds blow till they have waken'd bodied, strong-minded, strong-soul

death! ed, strong-hearted man reaches his And let the labouring bark climb hills of true prime till he is turned of forty;

seas, and he keeps in it till sixty-being Oy

Olympus.high ; and duck again as low probably at seventy threatened with

As hell's from heaven! If it were now a small family by a second or third

to die, wife. Othello was also, as all the

'Twere now to be most happy; for I

fear world knows, the most eloquent man of the age-"Rude am I in speech,

My soul hath her content so absolute,

That not another comfort like to this and little graced with the set phrase

Succeeds in unknown fate.

Sic of peace !" So Burke used to speak of Desd.

The heavens forbid, “ my poor abilities.” But hear the But that our loves and comforts should Duke of Venice. “I think this tale

increase, would win my daughter too,” or any Even as our days do grow! other woman. He was the bravest, Oth. Amen to that, sweet powers ! and the most victorious, and de- I cannot speak enough of this content, scended--we chance to know-from It stops me here; it is too much of joy;

be,

or

ma the kingly line of Gebel el Tuarie

. !," For how many hundred years did he the Moors keep marrying—or worse to Spanish ladies in the Peninsula?

The." gentle Desdemona," then, im stands acquitted of all blame, in every ent court of conscience, and honcur, and nad taste in Europe. But Othello was a

- modest man, and had within him the The germs of fear, and doubt

, and jea Jay Tousy, which, under the infusion of to the bitter waters of suspicion poured

upon them by the diabólical cundid still and malignity of lago, expanded into had a huge hideous flower ten times ever blacker than the “ sooty bosom" is aagi, which that deadly nightshade grex

be. -and thence distraction, delirium, ould danger, despair, and death.

Desdemona was truly a Character
- the of Affection-but of passion too-–and
alf as likewise of imagination. In her lä-
uncil ture affection was predominant-and
tance she was purest of the pure. But she
nat, if would not “ be left behind, a muih
e the of peace," -an unenjoyed bride.
Ivon-

" If he go to the war,
zona The rites for which I love him are dë.
ually nied me;"
tance

de

And this, and this, the greatest discord Before, behind thee, and on every hand

[Kissing her. Enwheel thee round!”
That e'er our hearts shall make."
That was passion-hallowed passion

Iago. She is sport for Jove. -but a fiend was to blast the heaven

Cas. She's a most exquisite lady. it brought in its mingled breath.

An inviting eye; and yet methinks right

modest.
Iago. O you are well tuned now, She is indeed perfection."
Bat I'll set down the pegs that make this
music !"

And in what graceful accomplish-
And that she had imagination, she

ments befitting her gentle condition

did Desdemona not excel ?
shewed the Moor " by devouring up
his discourse,

“Is free of speech, sings, plays, and • Wherein of antres vast, and desarts

dances well." idle,

“ So delicate with her needle! An ad

mirable musician ! 0 she will sing the Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven,

savageness out of a bear! Of so high and It was my hint to speak."

plenteous wit and invention !" Some one has said, that we “ think Othello himself tells us so the as little of the persons of Shak- very instant he had saidspeare's heroines as they do them

“ Ay, let her rot, and perish, and be selves, because we are let into the

damned to-night!" secrets of their hearts, which are more important." The remark is in On both sides the love was perfect every way poor. In what great tra- love. On Othello's, high and heroic, gic dramas are women nobly" doing and exulting in its guardian power exor suffering ” taken up about their tended like a shield over the blessed persons? In none; and in all we object of a new delight. On Desdeare let into the secrets of their mona's, pure, profound, devoted, and hearts. But the remark is not true fearlessly happy, in the pride of hawith respect to us. We do think ving her destiny linked with that glovery much of their persons, and so rious alien who was the pride and did Shakspeare. And of the persons the prop of the state. Nature made of none of them all more than Des. them for each other--though he was demona's.

sable, and she exceeding fair-his “ Mon. But, good lieutenant, is your soul made of fire, and hers of the general wived ?

moonlight and nothing in the comCas. Most fortunately: he hath mon course of nature hindered that achieved a maid,

through all life long they should be That paragons description, and wild fame; blessed. But power is given to the One that excels the quirks of blazoning Prince of the Air to trouble with pens,

perplexity and confusion the clearest And in the essential vesture of creation, and the noblest spirits-and he had Does bear all excellency;"

an earthly minister of his will, a devil

in a human shape-(“I look down “ Cas. He has had a most favourable towards his feet--but that's a fable") and happy speed :

-that leered, and sneered, and inTempests themselves, high seas, and sinuated, and lied, and whispered howling winds,

Othello into a murderer.
The gutter'd rocks, and congregated

Desdemona's case was a far dif-
sands,
Traitors ensteep'd to clog the guiltless ferent one, indeed, from that of either

Hermione or Imogen. Hermione keel,

had with her all the court. Leontes As having sense of beauty, do omit Their mortal natures, letting go safely by

was furious, but not terrible-his The divine Desdemona."

senseless anger wanted the dreadful

ness of deadly wrath. His queen Cas. The riches of the ship is come

was granted a public trial. “And on shore !

nobly she stood up in her own deYe men of Cyprus, let her have your fence. Appeal being made to the

Oracle, in her innocence she had noHail to thee, lady! and the grace of thing to fear. Her dignity was that heaven,

My dear Othello;

Des.

18"

joy!

me

Man- and she blushes not--nor needed she
ning, to blush-in making that arowal is
1, and the face of the senate. That was
ley), passion--hallowed passion. And wil
utle- ness their meeting after the storm in
auti. Cyprus :-
from
dept,

· Oth. O my fair warrior !
the Oth. It gives me wonder great as af
ptain content,

He To see you here before me. O my soul's
Pars,

If after every tempest come such całas,
onge

Maythe winds blow till they have waken'd
oul-

death!
his And let the labouring bark climb hils d'

Olympus-high; and duck again as low
zing As bell's

from heaven! If it were non
rith
ird
"Twere now to be most happy; for I

Sear
an My soul hath her content so absolute,
h, That not another comfort like to this
je Succeeds in unknown fate.

Desd. The heavens forbid,
© But that our loves and comforts should

increase,
y Even as our days do grow!

Oth. Amen to that, sweet powers!
I cannot speak enough of this content

,
pops me here; it is too much of jop;

seas,

rty;

to die,

he

of

knees :

e

of a noble nature; and self-support

را

past,

Des.

ed, heaven-acquitted, her very sta- to think of the change from the days ture seems to rise before our imagi. when first nation at the reading of the response. " She loved him for the dangers he had No fears have we for her from the beginning to the end of her hus

And he loved her because she pitied band's jealousy-we foresee her

them." triumph. Imogen has not to look

And then, as if stupified by his dreadon the face of Posthumus while he is

ful looks, she resigns herself with meditating her murder. At hearing

but feeble resistance to the feeling of of that letter her agony is great-but

her fate. she soon sees that she has no reason to shudder at Pisanio's sword. Her Des. By my troth, I'm glad on't. adventures are wild; but with grief Oih.

Indeed! and horror are mingled comfort and

My lord ? peace, and all she meets sympathize

Oth. I am glad to see you mad. with her in her known and unknown

Des. How, sweet Othello! affliction. Most beautiful is her cha

Oth, Devil!

[Striking her. racter in all her trials; but her very

Dcs. I have not deserved this.

Oth. O devil! devil! despair seems to fade into melan

Des. I will not stay to offend you. choly, like mournful music or moonlight. Nothing happens to shake our

[Going.

Oth. Hence! avaunt! trust, for a moment, in a happy end.

[Exit Desdemona.ing; the fair pilgrim we know well is not to be a martyr; her sufferings That blow (only a blackamoor could are not those of one who is to be have struck it) has killed all the herself a sacrifice. But Desdemona! strength that lodged in Desdemona's she is seen to be circumvented, al- heart-but love. She is more than most from the very first change on passive now--for she walks in the the Moor's face, with inevitable fear of the shadow of death. Sent doom. For a while she herself has for, she comes-"My lord! what is no fears, for she knows not of what your will ?” she is suspected-that she is sus

" Oth. Let me see your eyes; look in pected at all; nor can she be made

my face. to comprehend that in Othello's soul

Des. What horrible fancy's this ?” there is any evil thought towards her

Yet in the midst of all Othello's -her innocence being so perfect that

mortal wrath, foaming with surf, she she cannot even imagine guilt. cannot think how that she can be “ Emil. Pray heaven, it be state mat

its cause! ters, as you think;

“ If, haply, you my father do suspect, And no conception, nor no jealous toy, An instrument of this your calling back, Concerning you.

Lay not the blame on me!" Des. Alas, the day! I never gave him cause.

“ I hope my noble lord esteems me hoEmil. But jealous souls will not be

nest." answer'd so:

Alas! what ignorant sin have I comThey are not ever jealous for the cause, mitted! But jealous for they are jealous : 'tis a Oth. What committed ? monster,

Impudent strumpet! Begot upon itself, born on itself.

Des. By heaven! you do me wrong. Des. Heaven keep that monster from Oth. Are you not a strumpet ? Othello's mind !"

Des. No; as I am a Christian !

If to preserve this vessel for my lord, A prayer for him, not for herself-50

From any other foul unlawful touch, blind in her simplicity is the most Be-not to be a strumpet, I am none. innocent of victims!

Oth. What, not a whore? Even after she can no longer doubt Des. No; as I shall be saved! that. “ this monster has entered Oth, Is it possible? Othello's mind,” she feels but for Des. O, heaven forgive us! him; and all her demeanour is mark- Oth. I cry your mercy then. ed by a “ sadder cheer.” But still I took you for that cunning whore of she is happy, so profound is her love. Venice Erelong she becomes very mournful That married with Othello."

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