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“ Sweet Mr Peabody, but this is a been feeding on thin fodder. I have, vastly warm day;" and having by for seven long years and more,known this time opened the door of her what it is to be a lanerly widow ; parlour, she added, “ I'm tired off but it's no the fortune of womanmy feet.

kind to change their condition at “Well, if so be,” cried he, “ I ex pleasure; you men of the male sect pect you should sit down."

have a great advantage over us." She said to herself, “ He does not Mr Peabody thought that this was offer me a chair; but it's a case of ex. the proper juncture for putting in a tremity, and I must not be standing word for his friend the squire. on trifles.--Mr Peabody, will ye no “Well, I calculate, talking of marbe seated ?" With that the old rying for a second spell, that Mr gentleman took a chair and seated Shortridge, what came cargo with bimself; upon which she added- you, is a dreadfullest proper fellour." “ Now, Mr Peabody, that's what I “What's that ye say of him?" cried like. I like to see friends among the lady. friends make themselves at home.” “ Well I do say it,” replied PeaBut the American, without noticing body; "and if he ben't, there are no her observation, fanned himself with snakes in Virginia.” his broad-brimmed straw hat, and “It would have been well for us ejaculated

had there never been an auntie « Well, I guess it be tarnation there.” warmer here than in Vermont.” At this moment, Pompey, who had

"I dinna misdoubt it," replied begun to grow impatient at being Mrs Clatterpenny; “ for by every kept so long, opened the door softly, thing I have heard, Vermont must be and seeing the pathetic posture of the a most pleasant country, a perfect two cousins, exclaimed softly, look land of Canaan, besides flowing with ing with white eyes—“What's iss ? milk and honey ;-ye'll have hills my eye!" But he withdrew his head there ?"

at the same moment. He had seen “I guess we have,” said Mr Pea- however, enough to excite his curibody," and tarnal big ones too." osity, and he again gently opened the

“No doubt,” said she,“ high and door and looked in. What he bebeld most romantical. How weel content to attract his attention so particuI would be to spend my latter end larly we know not, but he inserted in Vermont, skipping upon the moun. his whole body, and with soundless tains, and harkening in the valleys feet fairly went into the room, and to the singing of nightingales, and placed himself behind their chairs, poets, and such o:her fouls; and I'm listening to, without much undersure, cousin Peabody, from what I standing the drift of their discourse; discern of your taste and under for it is quite unnecessary, when man standing, your house must be in a or woman is actuated by a genuine very airy situation.”

curiosity, to understand what others “It ben't though,” cried he,“ being may be saying. This endowment Pomin a hollow, as you see, between pey had in the highest degree of perneighbour Timpson's fen and deacon fection; and,on the present occasion, Screechwell's cedar swamp.”

it was in some measure excited by None daunted by the intelligence, the previous opinion that he had the loving dame exclaimed, Dear formed of the condition of Mrs Clatme, does cedar grow so near your terpenny. Observing that the rawhabitation? Oh, but it must be a ness of the morning air, in coming scriptural tabernacle, putting us aye across the Park, had made her comin mind of the cedars of Lebanon · plexion of a glowing red and purple, and Solomon's Temple. No doubt while the tidings she had received there are great guns of the gospel from Mr Threeper; respecting her there ?"

aunt in Virginia, had filled her eyes “ Yes, I reckon," said Mr Peabody; with water, Pompey had made a very “religion is in popularity in Vermont natural conclusion from her appearat present.”

ance at that time, for her looks had "Oh,” replied his cousin, “but received no improvement by the that's a comcly thing! for since you tidings which she had learned of so lost poor dear Mrs Peabody, ye bave near and dear a relation being found,

But it is time to resume the thread entrance of the blackamooi las obliof our discourse, which the stealthy ged us to suspend.

CHAPTER X.

Is, but this is a been feeding on thin fodder. I have, and having by for seren long years and more, known he door of her what it is to be a lanerly widow; “ I'm tired off but it's no the fortune of woman.

kind to change their condition at cried he, “I ex- pleasure; you men of the male sect

own." have a great advantage orer us.' ;" He does not Mr Peabody thought that this was It's a case of ex. the proper juncture for putting in a not be standing word for his friend the squire. ody, will ye no "Well, I calculate, talking of mar.

that the old rying for a second spell, that Mr air and seated Shortridge, what came cargo with 1 she added you, is a dreadfullest proper fellour."

that's what I What's that ye say of him?" cried friends among the lady. Ives at home.' “Well I do say it,replied Perithout noticing body; "and if he ben't

, there are no ed himself with snakes in Virginia.". straw bat, and “It would have been well for us

had there never been an auntie 1 be tarnation there."

Vermont.At this moment, Pompey, who had bt it," replied begun to grow impatient at being * for by every kept so long, opened the door softls

, rmont must be and seeing the pathetic posture of the

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WITHOUT observing that Pompey she, with a languishing sigh ; "oh, was behind them, and listening, Mrs my too combustible heart !" Clatterpenny continued—“Talking At this crisis she laid her hand on of second marriages, Mr Shortridge Mr. Peabody's; and Pompey from is no a commodity for my money. behind, with a leering look, put his No no, dear cousin Peabody, if ever head between them. I make a change, and it's no a small “ The devil !” cried Mr Peabody, matter that would tempt me, my starting off apart. taste would choose something more “Oh missy, oh massa l” cried Pomto the purpose, for he's ower young.” pey, looking at the astonished pair.

“I expect,” said Peabody," that * I'll faint,” cried she; “hold out he's older than you think, and you your arms, sweet Mr Peabody, that ben't yourself so old in my eyes as

I may faint in them.” you look”-at the same time he turn Peabody, however, gave an uped aside mumbling," though ugly ward look, and she fell into the arms enough to stop a sawmill or a nig- of Pompey, upon which she uttered ger's burial.”

a shrill scream, and ran off, followed "What you say,” replied Mrs Clat- by the negro, while the Yankee, lookterpenny,“ is a most just observe. ing knowingly after them, said coolly, I have aye been thought vastly Well, this be pretty special too ; younger than I look like; I was even and yet I expect she has the rights more so when in ray teens."

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atry, a perfect two cousins, exclaimed softly, look s flowing with ing with white eyes--"What's iss ? 'll have hills my eye!" But he withdrew his head

at the same moment. He had seen said Mr Pea- however, enough to excite bis curiones too." osity, and be again gently opened the ne," high and door and looked in. What he bebeld weel content to attract his attention so particumy latter endlarly we know not, but be inserted on the moun- his whole body, and with soundless 7 the valleys feet fairly went into the room, and tingales, and placed himself behind their chairs, uls; and I'm listening to, without much underfrom what I standing the drift of their discourse;

and under- for it is quite unnecessary, when man must be in a or woman is actuated by a genuine

curiosity, to understand whai others dhe," being may be saying. This endowment Pom. ce, between pey had in the bighest degree of perand deacon fection; and, on the present occasion

, it was in some measure excited by ntelligence, the prerious opinion that he had ed. "Dear formed of the condition of Mrs Clatnear your terpenny. Observing that the ram. ness of the morning air

, in coming ing us aye across the Park, had made her com. Lebanon · plexion of a glowing red and purple, To doubt while the tidings she had received e gospel from Mr Threeper; respecting her

aunt in Virginia, had filled her eyes Peabody; with water, Pompey bad made a rery Vermont natural conclusion from her appear.

on't. A woman of her years to take Mr Peabody looked askance at her, up with the squire, would be an and said to himself

, “That's a boun. Ethiopian shame; but I reckon, had cer.” Presently, however, he added, he been of as good an age as I, she in a more conciliatory key, “ But would have come to. But here is don't you think the squire a ter her 'torney at law; I'll speak to him. rible smart man ? I know he is.” - Mister-I say, mister, if so be you

"Oh, oh,” said the old lady,“ he's ha’n't cause for scudding, I would jealous of Mr Shortridge, 'cause we

like to talk a word or so with you came in the same ship. No, no, concerning our cousin Dame Claitersweet Mr Peabody, it will be long penny's circumstance, because, you to the day or my fancy fix on see, she is my relation.” bim; if ever I make another choice, At this summons, Mr Threeper, I'll choose a sober sensible man who was on the landing-place, enterlike you; and I think I would pre- ed the room, and said, “ At your serfer an American, for they say that vice, Mr Peabody.” the 'mericans make the best of hus As if the old man was at a loss bands.”

what to say, he eyed the advocate The Vermont farmer looked at from top to toe, and then continued, her queerly, and then said, "I guess

“ I expect, mister, that cousin that Scotch women make the best of Clatterpenny has been glomrified wives."

some at my claim to them 'ere lands This return of the compliment in Scotland State.” quite overwhelmed the modesty of Mr Threeper drew himself up Mrs Clatterpenny, and she cried, co- erectly, and said with a superciliousvering her cheek with her band, and ness worthy of his profession, tapresenting her palm towards Mr king a pinch of snuff

, at the same Peabody," and averting her head, time,Oh my dear sir, don't des “Oh, spare my blushes!”

ceive yourself; your claim is worth " There is no occasion to blush at nothing." all,” said he, “ unless you like it;

“ That's plain, I guess," replied but I have an omnipotent wish to

Mr Peabody. “If I was not some"peak of that 'ere Glasgow squire."

how by instinct thinking so myself, "Speak not of him," exclaimed or I am a cranberry; and bottle me

mp."

must be a

ance at that time, for her looks had n, but received no improrement by the ince rou tidings ishich she had learned of so

and dear a relation being found,

mear

for gin in a Rotterdam greybeard, under the conjugal yoke, why, I if I would go to pursue cousin Clat- think”-and he stopped at these terpenny with law, if so be as how words, suddenly arrested in thought. we could settle it friendly.”

“Now, mister," said Peabody, Mr Threeper pricked up his ears waiting for his explanation," and at this; it seemed in accordance what may that think be?” with what the old lady had been The Edinburgh lawyer replied bespeaking his counsel for, and he very adroitly,“ it would be a happy ejaculated to himself,—"Ah! what's way of putting an end to family dif. this ?”

ferences.” Mr Peabody continued

“ I calculate," said Peabody, “it “Now, you think her as valuable might be the beginning of family as nothing; but I'd give my male differences; but, mister," cow and three heifers, to have an “ Sir ?" other such in my house at Mount “ Could'nt you, in a far off way, Pisgah, State of Vermont.”

round a corner, see how the wind «°Is this possible ?” cried the advo. hauls with the old ladye?" cate aloud. “Yes, Mrs Clatterpenny Mr Threeper, at this, shook his is indeed, a most surprising woman, head in the most sagacious manner, -shrewd, discerning, nimble for her and replied, "Impossible! I am her years; managing in her cares every professional adviser, my duty is to shilling she spends, and she sees both protect her; couldn't think of recomsides of it before she parts with it. I mending her to marry-no, Mr Peaknow few like her.”

body, not even you." Peabody replied “ that she indeed This was uttered with such solemtook care of Number One.-And so nity, that it had a manifest effect upyou think,” said he, “ that her claim to on the old gentleman, who immebe inheritor is better than mine after diately said, "Well, that mayn't be all ?"

quite propriety; but couldn't you, by Mr Threeper hesitated a little, the way of a squint, give her to unand throwing back his head, with derstand'em'ere three ways of scaldprofessional sapience replied, ing the hog?-But, between you and i Upon that subject, the integrity of I, I'd rather go halves.” my gown denies me freedom of Mr Threeper started at this, and, speech; but this I know, and may stepping aside, exclaimed," Can say to you as her kinsman, that ac- he know of Tompkins's advantage ?" cording to the evidence given in, But, before he was upright, Peabody she has quite as good a chance of cried, "I was saying, mister, I'd establishing her claim, as you have rather go halves than splice, for, you of proving yours. More it becomes know, she can talk.” not me to say ; less perhaps had been Just at this moment a knocking more prudent.”

was heard on the door, and, on openThe Vermont farmer looked a little ing it, Mr Shortridge made his apgrave at this, and after pondering pearance, not in the best order. He well for a short time, he said

bad been with Miss Octavia, and had “ Which, now, in your opinion,(l not been treated by her, as, in his own does not ask your opinion according opinion, his merits deserved ; withto law,) but which would you com- out, also, knowing the whole facts of mend for she and I to do-to half the case, he had begun to suspect, stakes, to go to law, or to 'spouse ?” that his father, notwithstanding his

To this Threeper promptly replied long forecasting faculty, had cut be_“I could never advise her to go fore the point, in supposing that an half with you. As for going to law, it American lady could be so easily is not graceful among relations.” , won. In short, the young gentleman

"Well," said the American, "you was much flurried, and his endeaa'n't the first man who didn't magnify vour to preserve a shew of serenity his own trade.”

was palpable to every beholder ; but, “ But," continued Mr Threeper, having introduced him, in this agiwithout changing his posture, and tated state, to Mr Peabody and Mr looking like a dungeon of wit, “ if Threeper, it merits a place in the Mrs Clatterpenny herself has not next Chapter, to relate what ensued. strong objections to coming again

gia in a Rotterdam greybeard, under the conjugal yoke, wby, I would go to pursue cousin Clat- think”—and he stopped at these enny with law, if so be as how words, suddenly arrested in thought ould settle it friendly."

“Now, mister,” said Peabody, Threeper pricked up his ears waiting for bis explanation," and iis ; it seemed in accordance what may that think be?"

what the old lady had been The Edinburgh lawyer replied aking his counsel for, and he very adroitly, “ it would be a happy lated to himself,—"Ah! what's way of putting an end to family dif.

ferences.' Peabody continued "I calculate," said Peabody," low, you think her as valuable might be the beginning of family thing; but I'd give my male differences; but, mister," and three heifers, to have an. “Sir?”

such in my house at Mount “Could'nt you, in a far of may, b, State of Vermont." round a corner, see how the wind this possible ?” cried the advo. hauls with the old ladye ?" loud. "Yes, Mrs Clatterpenny Mr Threeper

, at this

, shook his eed, a most surprising woman, head in the most sagacious manner, ewd, discerning, nimble for her and replied, "Impossible! I am her ; managing in her cares every professional adviser, my duty is to ig she spends, and she sees both protect her; couldn't think of recom. of it before she parts with it. I mending her to marry~no, Mr Peas

body, not even you."

few like her."
body replied " that she indeed
are of Number One. And so nity, that it had a manifest effect up-

This was uttered with such solem-
nk," said he," that her claim to on the old gentleman, who imme-
ritor is better than mine after diately said, "Well

, that mayn't be quite propriety; but couldn't you

, by Threeper hesitated a little, the way of a squint

, give her to un
owing back his head, with derstand'em'ere three ways of scald-
onal sapience replied, ing the hog?--But, between you and
that subject

, the integrity of I, I'd rather go halves.”
in denies me freedom of Mr Threeper started at this, and

,
but this I know, and may stepping aside, exclaimed, -" Can
ou as her kinsman, that ac- he know of Tompkins's advantage ?''
to the evidence given in, But, before he was upright, Peabody
quite as good a chance of cried, "I was saying, mister,
ing her claim, as you hare rather go halves than splice, for, you
1g yours. More it becomes know, she can talk.
say; less perhaps had been Just at this moment a knocking

was heard on the door, and, on open.
rmont farmer looked a little ing it, Mr Shortridge made his ap-
this, and after pondering pearance, not in the best order. He

had been with Miss Octavia, and had i, now, in your opinion, (I not been treated by her, as, in his own

CHAPTER XI. MR ARCHIBALD SHORTRIDGE, jun., “ Then you don't think," enquired came forward, with that smirk, bow, Mr Shortridge, “ that it is a very riand cringe, which betokens a gem of diculous affair ?” Mr Threeper, fillthe first water in a certain metropo- ing the other nostril, said, " It is a lis of the west of Scotland, and which, most judicious affair.". The young on the present occasion, there is no merchant, delighted to hear this, deneed to name.

clared, in the ardour of his heart, "Glad, gentlemen," said he, “I that the thought had never entered am to have found you together. No- bis head, till Mr Peabody spoke to thing like doing business off hand. him. Mr Peabody, I have considered your At this the American came huradvice, and I do think that many a riedly towards them, crying,"I man has matched worse than with swear, Mister and Squire, we be all such a lady.”

on the wrong tack; but here comes The American took, for some time, cousin Clatterpenny herself, and we no part in the conversation, but he shall soon be all slick.” listened with ears apert, and now At this moment the lady entered and then spoke to himself, or, as the the apartment. Brimful of news players have it in their books, he let she appeared, or rather with expecthe audience know what he thought tations; but, however that may be, in a whisper, aside. But the Edin- her face was as a book in which men burgh lawyer, more professionally lo- might read strange matters. quacious, said to the young mer Eh,gentlemen,” cried she, “whatchant,-"So be seems to think.” na brewing's in the cauldron now,

On hearing this, the Verniont na- that you're laying your heads thetive said to himself, “He has swal- gither, as if ye were three wise men lowed the hook !"

from the East? Dear cousin, you being Mr Shortridge not overhearing a 'merican, should recollect that ye him, addressed Mr Threeper, and come out of the West.” said, -"As you have great influence While she was saying this, Shortwith her, might I solicit your aid ?" ridge, in a low voice, requested him

The advocate, conceiving that he to speak a good word in favour of spoke of Mr Peabody's penchant for his suit; and Peabody, at the same Mrs Clatterpenny, replied,"I have moment, whispered to Mr Threeper, just told Mr Peabody, that profes

-—"Can't you tell her of my three sional delicacy lays an interdict on offers ?” all direct interference on my part."

But, before he had time to answer, Mr Shortridge, who thought only Mrs Clatterpenny enquired, in his of himself, imagining that the obser- ear, if he had made an incision. vation applied to his own case, an.

All this caused a little delay, duswered, "I beg your pardon, but I ring which, the American, becoming have to thank Mr Peabody for the somewhat impatient, spoke himself kind and warm interest he has taken to Mrs Clatterpenny,"Well, couin my behalf.”

sin,” said he, "I have been making Mr Threeper, still in error, said, my calculations with this here 'tor“It is grateful in you to be anxious ney, and he will tell you the terms." to repay it, but, in this matter, for « Oh,” cried Mrs Clatterpenny, the reason I have stated, I cannot in- with a languishing and emphatic leer, terfere; you may, however, with su- “ do not speak of that; ours will not perior effect."

be a bargaining; I'll surrender at disMr Shortridge having no other in- cretion. terjection at hand, exclaimed,"I The Glasgow beau, no longer able am surprised!”

to repress his ardent passion, caught “Not more than I am,” replied Mr her in his arms, exclaiming,~" My Threeper ; " the lady surprised

me, dear ma'am, I could not have antiMr Peabody surprised me, and you cipated, so early, such happiness !" have surprised me.” And, in saying Mrs Clatterpenny, amazed at his these words, he rapped

upon the lid freedom, cried, pushing him off, of his snuff-box, opened it, and took “Keep your distance, Mr Shortridge; a pinch.

another cat shall lap in my porrin

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dent.

short time, he said

sk your opinion according opinion, his merits deserved; withut which would you com- out, also, knowing the whole facts of she and I to doấto half the case, he had begun to suspect, o to law, or to 'spouse?" that his father, notwithstanding his hreeper promptly replied long forecasting faculty, had cut benever advise her to go fore the point, in supposing that an u. As for going to law, it American lady could be so easily

won. In short, the young

gentleman aid the American, you was much flurried, and his endeaman who didn't magüify rour to preserve a shew of serenity

was palpable to every beholder; but, atinued Mr Threeper, having introduced him, in this agihis posture, and tated state, to Mr Peabody and Mr of wit, if Threeper, it merits a place in the

not next Chapter, to relate what ensued.

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ger. All the tender affections cannot “Well then, 'Tavy," said the Amebe controlled, can they, my sweet rican father, “ I'll be no longer a cousin ?”

'pediment.; he may take you by the “ Now," said Mr Peabody, “ I arm and walk in the streets when sha'n't be a sweet cousin but upon you likes." conditions. Do you, sir, being her Mrs Clatterpenny was confound'torney, tell her.”

ed, and scarcely knowing what she The business was proceeding ra said, cried, “ Am I an owl in the ther quicker than a lawsuit; but desert ?” Mr Threeper, shifting his position, “No, madam,” said Mr Threeper, said, in a suppressed accent, to Mrs in the best style of the coterie of the Clatterpenny,“ He has spoken to stove in the Parliament House, “the me in the most satisfactory manner. constancy of my attention to your I have arranged all happily for you, concerns should convince you that and will secure as good a settlement some interest nearer and dearer as I can."

than a professional engagement has “I am greatly obligated to you, knit me to your cause." Mr Threeper. No a man that walks “Ah, Mr Threeper !” replied the the Parliament House knows better widow, “but, if I marry again, my how many blue beans it takes to jointure by the dear deceased docmake five than yourself. You shall tor goes away, and ye are a man get a solatium for this turn."

yourself of no substance." At the same moment Peabody As this was said, Mr Tompkins turned round to Shortridge, and stepped forward and addressed Mrs said, “She won't have you; and Clatterpenny, somewhat formally. therefore I calculate on having her “Let not that, however,” said he, myself.”

“ my dear lady, be an obstacle to “ What!” indignantly cried Short- your union; for I have given him an ridge-"choused ?”

undertaking to settle on you a thouBefore he could say another word, sand dollars a-year to mitigate your Tompkins and Miss Octavia entered disappointment.” the room ; and Tompkins, stepping « Mr Threeper, is this true?” exforward, said to Mr Threeper, claimed the old lady. “ Oh, ye son “ Have you told him ?”

of deceitfulness, no to tell me but ye The reply was a mystery to all had interests nearer and dearer than present.

professional engagements !” “I have neither yet had time norShe then turned round to Mr opportunity.”

Tompkins, and thanked him for his " Then I will do it myself,” said generosity with one of her most graTompkins; and turning round to cious smiles; while Peabody mutPeabody, he added, “ I hope, sir, tered to himself, “ A thousand dolthat the only objection to my union lars a-year! Well, it would be a good with your daughter is now removed. spec. to have her yet;" and going This learned gentleman has exa- towards her, he said, “ My dear mined my claim to the Ardenlochie cousin” estates, and has declared me the “My dear cousin !" said she, with heir-at-law.”

a toss of her head, “ get you to Shortridge, who was a little net- Jericho!” And she flung as it were tled, said, I see the cause of her the old man away. setting her affections on you, old Mr Shortridge, on seeing this, gentleman.”

said, “ None of them, ma'am, have “Well, I do so likewise," replied been actuated with such true regard Peabody.

as me.” “ But, my sweet cousin,” said Mrs “ 'Deed, Mr Shortridge,” replied Clatterpenny.

the old lady, “ I see that ye have a “ To Jericho !” cried Peabody; thousand reasons for saying so; but " but I say, mister, is that 'ere true I am no a nymph in ber juvenility. what Charlie Tompkins has been a. No, no; I'm oure auld a hen to be telling?”

caught by chaff.” “ It is," replied Threeper, with And, in saying this, she wished the professional dignity; “his evidence young couple all manner of health is indubitable, and no possible ob- and joy for the remainder of their stacle can be set up to bis claim.” lives, in which we cordially join.

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