Page images
PDF
EPUB

and of the Foreign Secretary it is have no idea of charging the English enough to say, that he was Lord councils with any factious and interDudley, a nobleman whose condi- meddling ambition. They may have tion of mind then was nearly as ec- been involved in the dispute by the centric as it is now. With a Sove- original weakness of Mr Canning's reign racked by pain, and a minister intervention-policy, and by the new proverbial for the ramblings of his system of Aattering the French gomind, we must require more evi. vernment. We speak of the whole dence than has hitherto transpired, transaction, not in the spirit of party, to decide that any pledge was given but in the common sense of everywhich could convict the giver of a day life. With the Portuguese choice deliberate intention to deceive. of the sitter on the throne, England

But let us suppose that he did in- has unquestionably no right whattend to deceive-that he was dipped ever to interfere. in the deepest stain of tergiversation but in one point we must beware -whatis that to the English people ?lest we are, however unconsciously, Where have we acquired the right of drawing a degree of guilt upon ourbringing foreign princes into judg- selves; and that point is, the present ment, let their veracity be what it practice of raising soldiers for the may ? The point is altogether per- Portuguese contest. No man has a sonal. It involves no breach of na- right to shed the blood of man but tional treaty, it has perfected no in selfdefence, or for the protection national offence. It may be a matter of the weak, and this latter only in for the Portuguese nation to consi- extreme cases. The soldier figbting der. But it is evident that they have for his country, fights virtually in not considered it to be worth their self-defence. But who can place the attention; and what right have we to recruits that are going off daily to declare to Portugal that she shall not fight in Portugal, in the list of selfhave a King according to her own defenders ? We are not at war with choice, because he broke his oath to Portugal as a nation, yet do we not his Austrian jailer, or beguiled the sanction, by this winking at the act, wandering intcllects of an English the crime of men going to shoot PorSecretary? To put the extreme case- tuguese for their pay? The same if Doni Miguel were personally guilty rule which now leads the British reof every crime that could degrade cruit to fight in Portugal, would the human character, we might sanction murder on the high-road. scorn and hate the individual, we The highwayman shoots men for might pronounce him unfit to sit what he can get by it. What perupon a throne, if we will, but the sonal feeling can the British half-pay arbitration does not rest with us. The officer, or the common soldier, have Portuguese nation, fully acquainted in the quarrel between two Portuwith the man and the character, have guese princes ? His feeling is, noto. chosen him for their monarch. And riously and simply, a desire to be which among our most red-hot set- employed, to get pay and promotion, tlers of nations, will venture to say and for that purpose he sheds the that they must wait for the approba- blood of Portuguese officers and soltion of England on the matter ? if diers ; strangers, whom he would they have chosen ill, the ill be on never meet but for thus seeking them. But the choice can be no their blood; and with whom he has more an affair of ours than the cala- no more national or personal quarmity. The Portuguese have shewn rel than with the man in the moon. that their choice was spontaneous; Beyond all doubt, this act of utterly they have since shewn that they ad unprovoked and unnecessary aggreshere to their choice; they are at this sion in the individual, is murderhour holding out defiance to the two murder in the eyes of God and man, most powerful nations of Europe, In this statement, we advocate the England and France, in assertiou of cause, no more of Dom Miguel than their choice; and in the name of of Dom Pedro. Embarking in the justice, freedom, and common sense, service of either, the British officer what right have we to say that they would be equally criminal. Our shall not have the King whom they government may not be able to prehave chosen? In these remarks we vent the entering of private and mis

ad of the Foreign Secretary it is have no idea of charging the English
(pouzh to say, that he was Lord councils with any factious and inter-
Ducity, a nobleman whose condi. meddling ambition. They may have
tion of mind then was nearly as ec- been involved in the dispute by the
centric as it is now. With a Sove. original weakness of Mr Canning's
reign racked by pain, and a minister intervention-policy, and by the new
prorerbial for the ramblings of his system of flattering the French go-
miad, we must require more evi. vernment. We speak of the whole
dence than has hitherto transpired, transaction, not in the spirit of party,
to decide that any pledge was given but in the common sense of every.
which could convict the giver of a day life. With the Portuguese choice
deliberate intention to deceive. of the sitter on the throne, England

But let us suppose that he did inhas unquestionably no right what-
tend to deceive-that he was dipped ever to interfere.
in the deepest stain of tergiversation
--what is that to the English people? lest we are, however unconsciously,

But in one point we must beware Where have we acquired the right of drawing a degree of guilt upon our. bringing foreign princes into judg- selves; and that point is, the present ment, let their veracity be what it practice of raising soldiers for the may? The point is altogether per- Portuguese contest. No man has a sonal. It involves no breach of nae right to shed the blood of man but tional treaty, it has perfected no in self-defence, or for the protection national offence. It may be a matter of the weak, and this latter only in for the Portuguese nation to consi- extreme cases. The soldier fighting der. But it is erident that they hare for his country, fights virtually in not considered it to be worth their self-defence. But who can place the attention; and what right have we to recruits that are going off daily to declare to Portugal that she shall not fight in Portugal, in the list of selfhare a king according to her own defenders ? We are not at war with choice, because be broke his oath to Portugal as a vation, yet do we not his Austrian jailer, or beguiled the sanction, by this winking at the act, wandering intellects of an English the crime of men going to shoot PorSecretary? To put the extreme case- tuguese for their pay? The same if Don Miguel ivere personally guilty rule which now leads the British reof every crime that could degrade cruit to fight in Portugal, would the human character, we might sanction murder on the high-road. scorn and hate the individual, we The highwayman shoots men for might pronounce him unfit to sit what he can get by it. What perupon a throne, if we will, but the sonal feeling can the British half-pay arbitration does not rest with us. The officer, or the common soldier, have Portuguese nation, fully acquainted in the quarrel between two Portuwith the man and the character, have guese princes? His feeling is, noto. chosen him for their monarch. And riously' and simply, a desire to be which among our most red-hot set- employed, to get pay and promotion, tlers of nations, will renture to say and for that purpose he sheds the that they must wait for the approba. blood of Portuguese officers and soltion of England on the matter ? if diers ; strangers, whom he would

never meet but for thus seeking But the choice can be no their blood; and with whom he has more an affair of ours than the cala- no more national or personal quarmity. The Portuguese have shewn rel than with the man in the moon. that their choice was spontaneous; Beyond all doubt, this act of utterly they have since shewn that they ad- unprovoked and unnecessary aggreshere to their choice; they are at this sion in the individual, is murder hour holding out defiance to the two murder in the eyes of God and man. most powerful nations of Europe, In this statement, we advocate the England and France, in assertion of cause, no more of Dom Miguel than their choice; and in the name of of Dom Pedro. Embarking in the justice, freedom, and common sense, service of either, the British officer

Our
what right have we to say that they would be equally criminal.
shall not have the King whom they government may not be able to pre-

In these remarks we vent the entering of private and mi.

litary persons into the quarrels of order to quiet the puble foreign countries. But over its half- preserve any shew of pay list it has a hold ; and if it shall Dom Pedro. But wit suffer a single individual to raise Sovereign the Portu men in this country for either of the were not content. The parties, it, beyond all controversy, a regency to be an aclputs itself into a position of bellige- of dependence on a rency. On this head we shall re had constituted itself joice to see our policy retracted. If separate and foreign s the Portuguese princes will continue perfectly justifiable na to present to Europe a spectacle un they refused to suffer precedented among all the frightful, become the disposer disgusting, and guilty spectacles of state; and they, in 183 later times, two brothers seeking Dom Miguel king, for each other's blood; let the British ject of national indepen take the only part suitable to a wise undoubted consistency and moral people; let the British na of their whole code of tion distinctly refuse to be an ac to the throne. Dom complice in this hideous exhibition ; for the purpose of shal or, if we must exert our power, let guel's succession, tran us exert it to conciliate and appease, daughter, Donna Maria, and put forth our intervention to stop existed no longer, he h a contest which outrages every pub- alienated it from himse lic interest, every principle of huma- up as a rival to the pris nity, and every command of religion. tional choice. The Po

The exact state of the question is tion, still considering this. Before the death of the late vernment of a child m King John the Sixth, Dom Pedro had, contrivance for keeping by an act of direct revolt, declared under the jurisdiction Brazil independent of Portugal, and and being justified by himself Emperor. On the death of the Cortes, rejecting the the late King, in 1826, the Portu. and his descendants, re guese nation, notwithstanding the ceive her as their Quce revolt, offered their crown to Dom armed in defence of t Pedro, on condition of his returning whom they chose, certa to Portugal, which, by the ancient any intervention of for laws, was essential to his possession whom they are now of the throne. The throne then, by whom they have hither those laws, came to the second son tendency whatever, un of the late King, but that son was a temptations, to abjure. prisoner in Austria. A regency was

It is evident that Dom appointed in this emergency, by the out his foreign brigade influence of Dom Pedro, at the head reign money, could not of which was his sister, the Infanta, in Portugal; it is equal wbich regency was suffered only in Dom Miguel is fighting consequence of the annexed condi- strength than the force tion, that on the second son's arritry. It is equally clean ving at the age of twenty-five that tinuance of the struge son should assume the regency; a alienate Portugal from E provision which notoriously pointed turb Spain with fears out Dom Miguel, he being twenty. abetted by England, an. three at the time, but incapable of sult, make them both listthe throne by reason of his beiug in overtures from Austria captivity. But even with this proviso as conservatives of the o the national discontent grew so vio system, in case of that lent, that it produced the insurrec now seems to menace E tion and invasion, which were put character of the individ down only by the British troops sent paratively unimportant out by Mr Canning, on the pretext tiou. The only point for that, as coming from Spain, they con consider is, whether she stituted a Spanish invasion. It was right to dictate the choic thus found necessary to release Dom reign to an independent Miguel, and appoint him Regent in

they have chosen ill, the ill be on them.

TOM CRINGLE'S Log.

CHAP. XVII.

SCENES IN CUBA.

Ariel.

- Safely in harbour
Is the King's ship.-In the deep nook where once
Thou calledst me up at midnight to fetch dew
From the still vexed Bermoothes-there she's hid.

The Tempest.

The spirit had indeed fled—the affair altogether.”—Bang's curiosity ethereal essence had departed-and here fairly got the better of him.. the poor wasted and blood-stained “I say, Don Ricardibus-do-beg husk which lay before us, could no pardon, though-do give over this longer be moved by our sorrows, or humbugging outlandish lingo of gratified by our sympathy. Yet I yours-speak like a Christian, in stood riveted to the spot, until I was your mother tongue, and leave off aroused by the deep-toned voice of your Spanish, which now,since I know Padre Carera, who, lifting up his it is all a bam, seems to sit as strangely hands towards heaven, addressed the on you as my grandmother's toupee Almighty in extempore prayer, be- would on Tom Cringle's Mary." seeching his mercy to our erring “Now do pray, Mr Bang,” said I, sister who had just departed. The when Don Ricardo broke inunusualness of this startled me. “Why, Mr Bang, I am, as you now “ As the tree falls, so must it lie,” had know, a Scotchman." been the creed of my forefathers, and “How do I know any such thing was mine; but now for the first time that is, for a certainty-while you I heard a clergyman wrestling in men- keep cruising amongst so many lintal agony, and interceding with the goes, as Tom there says ?” God who hath said, “ Repent before “ The docken, man," said I.-Don the night cometh in which no man Ricardo smiled. can work,” for a sinful creature, “I am a Scotchiman, my dear sir; whose worn out frame was now as a and the same person who in his youth clod of the valley. But I had little was neither more nor less than wee time for consideration, as presently Richy Cloche, in the long town of all the negro servants of the establish- Kirkaldy, is in his old age Don Riment set up a loud howl, as if they cardo Campana of St Jago de Cuba. had lost their nearest and dearest. But more of this anon,-at present “Oh, our poor dear young mistress we are in the house of mourning, and is dead ! She has gone to the bosom of alas the day! that it should be so." the Virgin!-She is gone to be happy!" By this time the storm had increa-" Then why the deuce make such sed most fearfully, and as Don Ria yelling ?” quoth Bang in the other cardo, Aaron, and myself, sat in the room, when this had been translated dark damp corner of the large to him. Glad to leave the chamber gloomy hall, we could scarcely see of death, I entered the large hall, each other, for the lightning bad now where I had left our friend.

ceased, and the darkness was so thick, “I say, Tom-awful work. Hear that had it not been for the light from how the rain pours, and-murder- the large funeral wax tapers, which such a flash! Why, in Jamaica, we had been instantly lit upon poor don't startle greatly at lightning, but Maria's death, in the room where absolutely I heard it hiss—there, she lay, that streamed through the again”-the noise of the thunder open door, we should have been unstopped further colloquy, and the able to see our very fingers before wind now burst down the valley with us. a loud roar.

« What is that?” said Campana; Don Ricardo joined us. “My good “heard you nothing, gentlemen ?” friends-we are in a scrape here- In the lulls of the rain and the what is to be done ?-a melancholy blast, the same long low cry was

TON CRINGLE'S LOG.

Cap. XVIL

SCENES IN CUBA.

Safe sin harkour

Brip book where once
CES LT Litto fetch dew
su se sa 16xri batbes-there she's hid.

The Tempest.

Don;

shad Dhand fed-tbe affair altogether.”—Bang's curiosity

TU ASHA and red and here fairls got the better of him.
Theo Tu TIST EDC Dickd-stained
BAV IN MO DO pardon, though—do give over this

" I say, Don Ricardibus-do-bez
Ber! he leidis amor humbugging outlandish lingo of
12:15 A sect. Yes I fours-speak like a Christian, in

risik In I was your mother tongue, and leave of

The Senioren Toice of your Spanish, which now,since I know

FAR VA up bis it is all a tam, seems to sit as strangels

tersruss Besitz egyike on you as my grandmother's toupe

4:2012: patei, be would on Tom Cringle’s Mary."

* Now do pray, Mr Bang,” said I,

INFONIN dapatedThe when Don Ricardo broke in-

114 sated me "Thr, Mr Bang, I am, as you now

• $mustie," had know & Scotchman.”
hayz pediationediders, and * How do I know any such thing

T7.1.1 row in ihesis time that is for a certaints—while you
I need YTTI #7sungir men- keep cruising amongst so many lin-

RIMIT, 12 tierced rih the goes, as Tom there says ?"
tabait se , * Repent beiore “The ducken, man,” said I. Don
the T.1 comes in which do ban Ricardo smiled.
Kmi,for a szile creature, * I am a Scotchman, my dear sir

;
TEN FOR-TDe Has Donas a and the same person who in his youth
cada: the . But I had linie tras neither more nor less than wee

me far consideration, as presently Richs Cloche, in the long town of
had the Defte Sertants of the estabiishe Kirhalds, is in his old age Don Ri.
meni sei up a loud how, as if ther cardo Campana of St Jago de Cuba.
head lost their dearesi and dearest

. But more of this anon,-at present
*C, oct pag drar Toung mistress we are in the house of mourning, and

'She has come to the bosom of alas the day! that it should be so."
thelreinshe is done to be happr.""* Br this time the storm had increa-

- Then whr the deuce make such sed most fearfully, and as Don Ri-

a reng" quoth Bang in the other cardo, Aaron, and myself, sat in the

ruim, when this had been translated dark damp corner of the large

to tim. Glad so leare the chamber gloomy hall

, we could scarcely see

of death, I cntered the large hall, each other, for the lightning had now
where I had left our friend.

ceased, and the darkness was so thick,
" I sar, Tom-awful work. Hear that had it not been for the light from
how the rain pours, and-murder- the large funeral wax tapers, which
such a tlash: 'Why, in Jamaica, we had been instantly, lit upon poor
don't startle greatly at lightning, but Maria’s death, in the room where
absolutely I heard it hiss--there

, she lay, that streamed through the

again”—the noise of the thunder open door, we should have been un-

stopped further colloquy, and the able to see our very fingers before

wind now burst down the valley with

“ What is that?" said Campana ;

a loud roar.

Don Ricardo joined us. “My good “heard you nothing, gentlemen ?"

In the lulls of the rain and the

friends--we are in a scrape here-
that is to be done ?-a melancholy blast, the same long low cry was

heard, which had startled me by latch, and the next mo
Maria's bedside, and occasioned the flat on his back, the larg
sudden and fatal exertion which had flown open with trer
been the cause of the bursting out lence, capsizing him lik
afresh of the bloodvessel.

The Padre from the in
Why," said I, “it is little more came to our assistance

than three o'clock in the afternoon joint exertions we at le

yet, dark as it is; let us sally out, Mr door to again and baru

Bang, for I verily believe that the which we made our e

hollo we have heard is my Captain's lee-side of the house E

voice, and, if I conjecture rightly, he Under other circumstan

must have arrived at the other side have been difficult to

of the river, probably with the Doc- laughing at the appeara

tor.”

We were all drenched

" Why, Tom,” quoth Aaron, “it is after we left the shelter
only three in the afternoon, as you and there was old Car
say, although by the sky I could al to the waist, with his la
most vouch for its being midnight, and long pigtail hangi.
--but I don't like that shouting-Did back, like a mandariz
you ever read of a water-kelpie, Don buttons. Next follow
Richy ?

black assistants, naked
“Poo, poo, nonsense,” said the scribed them, allthree w

"Mr Cringle is, I fear, right of rope in their hands,
enough.” At this moment the wind man and his deputies; th
thundered at the door and windows friend Bang and myself
shutters, and howled amongst the coats or hats, with h
neighbouring trees and round the tied round our heads, ar
roof, as if it would have blown the bent down so as to ster
house down upon our devoted heads. strongly as we could.
The cry was again heard, during a But the planting atto
momentary pause.

schemer, a kind of Wii
Zounds!” said Bang, “it is the bis way, had thought fita
skipper's voice, as sure as fate—he in the world, to bring !
must be in danger-let us go and see,

which the wind, as mig

Tom.”

expected, reversed mos

“Take me with you,” said Cam- niously the moment he

pana,--the foremost always when any hoist it, and tore it from

good deed was to be done,-and, in that, on the impulse of

place of clapping on his great-coat to he had to clutch the flyin

meet the storm, to our unutterable thrust his head throug

surprise, he began to disrobe himself, where the stick had sto

all to bis trowsers and large straw had been some curious

hat. He then called one of the ser we turned the corner a

vants, “ trae me un lasso.” The lasso, the full force of the st

a long, thong of plaited hide, was right in the teeth, whenf

forthwith brought; he coiled it up Ricardo's hat past us ;

in his left hand. “ Now, Pedro," said blackamoors had taken

he to the negro servant who had tion to strap each of

fetched it, (a tall strapping fellow,) with a strong grass lanya

"you and Gaspar follow me. Gen- tinued to work to win

tlemen, are you ready?” Gaspar every now and then the

appeared, properly accoutred, with past'us on the gale loud

a long pole in one hand and a thong er, until it guided us to

similar to Don Ricardo's in the other, which we had crossed

he as well as his comrade being stark arrival. We stopped the

naked all to their waistcloths.“ Ah, torrent was rushing to

well done, my sons,” said Don Ri- past us, but we saw noi

cardo, as both the negroes prepared few wet and shivering pe

to follow their master. So off we opposite side, who ha

started to the door, although we

themselves under a clis

heard the tormenta raging without busily employed in at

with appalling fury. Bang undid the light a fire. The holloin

us.

“ Why, what can be wrong ?” at with cold. At the foot of the tree sat length said Don Ricardo, and he in rueful mood, a small antique beau shouted to the people on the oppo. of an old man in a coat which had site side.

once been blue silk, wearing breeches He might as well have spared his the original colour of which no man breath, for, although they saw his could tell, and without his wig, his gestures and the motion of his lips, clear bald pate shining amidst the they no more heard him than we did surrounding desolation like an osthem, as they very considerately in trich's egg. Beside these worthies return made mouths at us, bellowing stood two trembling way-worn mules no doubt that they could not hear us. with drooping heads, their long ears

“Don Ricardo—Don Ricardo !” at hanging down most disconsolately. this crisis sung out Gaspar, who had The moment we came in sight, the clambered up the rock, to have a peep skipper hailed us. about him,-“ Ave Maria-Alla son “ Why, I am hoarse with bawling, dos pobres, que peresquen pronto, si Don Ricardo, but here am I and el nosotros no pueden ayudarlos." Doctor Pavo Real, in as sorry a

“Whereabout ?” said Campana- plight as any two gentlemen need “whereabouts ? speak, man, speak.” be. On attempting the ford two

“Down in the valley-about a hours ago, blockheads as we were quarter of a league, I see two men on -beg pardon, Don Pavo”-the Doca large rock, in the middle of the

tor bowed, and grinned like a bastream; the wind is in that direction, boon—"we had nearly been drownit must be them we heard."

ed; indeed, we should have been “ God be gracious to us! true drowned entirely, had we not brought enouglıếtrue enough, --let us go to up on this island of Barataria here. them then-my children." And we -But how is the young lady? tell again all cantered off after the excel. me that,” said the excellent-hearted lent Don Ricardo. But before we fellow, even in the midst of his own could reach the spot, we had to make danger. a detour, and come down upon it 5. Mind yourself, my beautiful from the precipitous brow of the child,” cried Bang: “How are we beetling cliff above, for there was no to get you on terra firma?" beach nor shore to the swollen river, Poo-in the easiest way possiwhich was here very deep, and sur- ble,” rejoined he, with true seamanged, rushing under the hollow bank like sell-possession. “I see you have with comparatively little noise, which ropes-Tom Cringle, heave me the was the reason why we heard the end of the line which Don Ricardo cries so distinctly.

carries, will you ?” The unfortunates who were in “ No, no-'I can do that myself,” peril, whoever they might be, seemed said Don Ricardo, and with a swing to comprehend our motions, for one he hove the leathern noose at the of them held out a white handker- skipper, and whipped it over his chief, which I immediately answer neck in a twinkling: The Scotch ed by a similar signal, when the Spaniard, I saw, was pluming himself shouting ceased, until, guided by on his skill, but N was up to the negroes, we reached the verge him, for in an instant he dropped of the cliff, and looked down from out of it,while in slipping through he the red crumbling bank on the foam let it fall over a broken limb of the ing water, as it swept past beneath. It was here about thirty yards broad, “ Such an eel-such an eеl !” divided by a rocky wedgelike islet, shouted the attendant negroes, both on which grew a profusion of dark expert hands with the lasso thembushes and one large tree, whose top- selves. most branches were on a level with Now, Don Ricardo, since I am us where we stood. This tree was not to be had, make your end of the divided, about twelve feet from the thong fast round that large stone root, into two limbs, in the fork of there." Campana did so. which sat, like a big monkey, no less that will do." And so saying, the a personage than Captain N-him- skipper warped himself to the top of self

, wet and dripping, with his clothes the cliff with great agility. He was besmeared with mud, and shivering no sooner in safety himself, however,

tree.

[ocr errors]

« Ah,

« PreviousContinue »