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h Garland.

ZEPHYRS.

All around was dark in mist,

But a star shone bright

In the lonely night, And the bosom of ocean kiss'd A favour'd spot, and the Zephyrs there Came to sport in the waters fair.

III.
G OF THE CONSERVATIVE STANDARD.
ner, let loyal breath fan her;
hree ages and more!

her, the fewer the bolder,
our fathers before.
f the Tricolor brave us;
ath its tatters advance-

in league to enslave us,
e ensign of France !
et loyal breath fan her,
ds of our gentlemen still-
mountain and valley,
on Liberty's hill !
of Honour, the flagstaff is founded
Rock of Ages below;
wild tempest resounded,
vill, though again it should blow!
! the ensign of honour !

up, up, and away-
tyrant and traitor,
g of defiance-hurrah!

CHORUS
Spirits, away-your wings renew

With healing balm in the briny dew, The dolphins float around,

And a circle track

With uplifted back, Like the stones upon Druid ground, That lie upon Carnac's dreary plain,So motionless they in the misty main.

CHORUS.

Spirits, away-your wings renew

With healing balm from the briny dew.
First Spirit. Sister spirit, where hast been ?
Second SPIRIT. Over the sands

Of burning lands,
From gardens fresh and green;
To fan the fever'd cheek to rest
Of a child on its fainting mother's breast.

CHORUS.

Sister spirits, your wings renew

With healing balm of the briny dew.
First Spirit. And thou, say, sister, where ?
THIRD SPIRIT. Where fountains play,

With silvery spray,
To the sun and the scented air ;
And sweet birds sing, and leaf and flower
Bend to the music in lady's bower.

IV.
G OF THE REVOLUTIONARY STANDARD.
ide of the levellers;
the Tricolor's praise
cvellers
zarnest to raise !
han bold,
g to hold,
'gainst order and law!
an Donkey then
deepest den,

for ever!--ee-aw!
aw!

for ever !-ee-aw!
afidels' Upas tree,
with poison and blood-
on, and sophistry,
ey prove the true good!
nd lust,
arts, it must
ngth from a vice it can drawv;

around
bison'd ground,
on for ever-ee-aw.
T!
or ererlee-aw !
gather'd around her,
th our feasting was dyed;
ved than we found her,

revel replied.
, my sons,

ones!
o values a straw ?
should roar,

CHORUS.
Sister spirits, your wings renew

With healing balm of the briny dew. Fourth SPIRIT. And I where blood was spilt

And as I fann'd

The murderer's hand,
It gave him a pang of guilt,
For he saw his brother lie cold in death,
And could not feel that reviving breath.

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Fifth SPIRIT. And I my pastime took

In wake of a ship

That her bows did dip,
And the salt spray from her shook.
Merrily danced the ship along
With flaunting colours, and seaman's song.

lor

CHORUS.
Sister spirits, your wings renew
With healing balm of the briny dew.

First Spirit. Dolphins, away-be free,

For I hear the swell

Of the Sea-God's shell,
That calls up the sleeping sea,
Alas ! the joy on that fated deck-
Weeping, and wailing, and prayer-and wreck!

CHORUS.
Sisters, away- the briny dew
No more may with healing your wings renew.

THE PICTURE.

A HORRID wood of unknown trees, that throw

An awful foliage, snakes about whose rind

Festoon'd in hideous idleness did wind,
And swing the black-green masses to and fro.
A river-none knew whence or where-did flow
Mysterious through; clouds, swoln and lurid, shined

Above, like freighted ships, waiting a wind;
And moans were heard, like some half-utter'd woe;

And shadowy monsters glided by, whose yell
Shook terribly th' unfathom’d wilderness.-

Where! The Great Maker, bis invisible
· And undiscover'd worlds doth yet impress

On thought, creation's mirror, wherein do dwell
His unattained wonders numberless.

MIGNON's song.

(From Göthe.)

Know you the land where the Lemon-tree blows,
In dark leaves embower'd the gold Orange glows;
The wind breathes softly from the deep blue sky;
Still is the Myrtle, and the Laurel high ;-
Know'st thou it ?

Thither! O thither!
Might I with thee-O, my beloved one !--go!
Know you the House, with its Chambers so bright-
The Roof rests on Columns, the Hall gleams with Light-
And Marble Statues stand and look on me ;-
“ What, my poor Child, have they done to thee ?”
Know'st thou it?

Thither! O thither!
Might I with thee, my own Protector! go!
Know you the Mountain ? its path in the Cloud ?
The Mule his way seeks in the dark Mist-shroud;
In caverns dwell the Dragon's ancient brood;
The Crag rushes down, and o'er it the Flood;
Know'st thou it ?

Thither! O thither!
Our way lies, Father ! Thither let us go!

H. H. J.

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Zephyrs.

CHORUS irits, your wings renew aling balm of the briny dew.

BY THE AUTHOR OF ANNALS OF THE PARISH, &c.

CHAPTER I.

, away--be free, hear the swell

Sea-God's shell, Is up the sleeping sea. e joy on that fated decko

and wailing, and prayer and wreck!

CHORUS.

away the briny dew e may with healing your wings renew.

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Hector Dhu, or Black Hector of nister of the parish, caused in Ardenlochie, was the last male of to be made respecting the hei his line, and when he died his estate his estate, and Mr Peabody went to heirs-female, descendants of Mrs Clatterpenny came forwar his grandfather, who left three daugh- course. ters. One of them was married to Some doubts of her right la a respectable writer to the signet in ways on the mind of that lady, Edinburgh; we say respectable, not she received a letter from a withstanding his profession. An- whom she had walking the h. other had emigrated with a relation tals in London, informing her to New York, and had been married Mr Peabody had arrived in the to an opulent farmer in the State of tish metropolis by one of the Vermont. The third was deemed York packet ships with his da fortunate in having married at Glas- ter, an uncommonly beautiful y gow a Virginia tobacco - planter, lady; and he gave his mother a whom she accompanied to that coun. tle hint, that probably it would try, where she was forgotten by her much expense, and keep the relations in our time; who also could tune in the house, if he could r not correctly say, whether the wife himself agreeable to Miss Octa of the writer to the signet or the "but,” he added, “I fear she int farmer's in Vermont was the eldest. to throw herself away upon a yo

The lady in Edinburgh had an man from Virginia, with whom only daughter, who in due season has lately become acquainted, was married to Dr Clatterpenny, who is in town on his return to who exercised the manifold calling, United States, from a tour tha trade, or profession, of druggist, sur has been making in some of the geon, or physician, in the borough interesting parts of Europe." town of Clarticloses.

As soon as Mrs Clatterpenny When we knew this lady she was ceived this letter, she acted with a widow well-stricken in years, and usual discretion and decision. distinguished for the nimbleness of this time she resided in the old her tongue, and the address with of Edinburgh, in a close celebr which she covered cunning and dis as a receptacle for the widows o cernment with a veil of folly. Faculty, and the relicts, as the Sc

A long period had elapsed, during call the surviving wives, of divi which the farmer's wife was not Among other acquaintance w beard of; in fact, the good-woman Mrs Clatterpenny knew in E died in giving birth to her only son, burgh, was a Mr Threeper, a n Jedediah Peabody of Mount Pisgah, ber of the Scotch Bar, who, like in the State of Vermont, and who at generality of his brethren, ha the time of this eventful history was

little to do with briefs or busin a widower, and the father of a very was exceedingly amusing to old pretty girl, who in the Yankee fa men. Upon the instant, our her shion was called Miss Octavia Mar- determined that she would see if garet Peabody, which her father and could make a cheap bargain fo other friends abridged, to save time, services and advice in the m into the name of Tavy.

she had to agitate with her kinse Of the Virginia planter's lady no Mr Peabody. In this she she thing whatever was known. She her wonted acumen; for, after kept up no communication with her ving disclosed to Mr Threeper friends or sisters, and was as good as pretensions to the Ardenlochie dead to all her cousins, when Hec- perty, she persuaded him not tor Dhu departed this life.

to take her case in hand, but to On his death, Dr Drone, the mis company her to London; in fac

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go shares with her in the adventure, Peabody at the time declined the and to agree for payment, that he invitation, but, from less to more, should be content either with the the subject being once introduced half of the estate, if he made good into their correspondence respecther claims to it; or the same re- ing staves and lumber, it was in the ward, if her son, in any way by his end pactioned between them, that advice, married the daughter of Mr Archie, (as he was called in those Peabody.

days,) our acquaintance, was propoAccordingly, an agreement be- sed for Miss Octavia Margaret; and, tween them to this effect was for- in consequence, when that young mally drawn up, and they proceeded lady was heard to have arrived in together in the steam-boat called the London, the aforesaid Archie, or, as United Kingdom, from Leith to Lon- he was now called, Archibald, judoa.

nior, was advised by his wily father They had, among other fellow-pas- to go and push his fortune, by the sengers, a Mr Archibald Shortridge, United Kingdom, with the young junior, a young man from Glasgow. lady. He was a good-natured fellow, ra Thus it came to pass, that the Unither fattish, and his father had been ted Kingdom was enriched with all some years ago Lord Provost of that these of our dramatis personæ, in royal city, which, by the bye, this addition to the usual clanjamphry young man was at great pains to let that constitute the cargoes of the strangers know. But though there steamers that ply between Leith and was a little weakness in this, he was London. a very passable character, as men It happened, however, that the pasgo in the world, and not overly nice sage was rough and squally, which, in his feelings. He had been bred Mrs Clatterpenny, in complaining of up in the notion, that gold is the her sickness, assured her compachief good in the world, and that nions made her a sore nymph. Mr they are great fools who think other. Threeper was speechless, and lay all wise.

day in his bed, crying « Oh! oh!” We should mention a striking cha as often as the steward addressed racteristic of bima way of stand- him; but Mr Shortridge, in all the ing very imposingly with his legs perils of the voyage, was as gay as apart, like the Colossus of Rhodes, a lark, and as thirsty as a duck; for with his head back, and his thumbs he had been on a voyage of pleasure, in the arm-holes of his waistcoat. like most young men of the TronIn this posture he was really a very gate, to the Craig of Ailsa, where he prognosticative figure. Many took feasted on solan geese, by which, as him for a member of the town-coun- he said himself, he was inured to cil before he was elected into that seafaring; but his appetite was none venerable body, and it was clearly improved. seen that he was ordained to be a When the vessel reached her moorbailie. Some went so far as to say, ings in the Thames, they somehow that they saw the signs of Lord Pro- got into a hackney.coach together, vost about him; at all events, it was perhaps there was a little political the universal opinion of those that economy in this and they took up knew him, that Mr Shortridge was their abode, on the recommendation not come to his kingdom.

of Mr Threeper, at the Talbot Inn, It happened odd enough, that old in the Borough. " It has been many Provost Shortridge, his father, and hundred years,” said he, a very Mr Peabody, had some correspond- celebrated house. Chaucer the poet ence together, in which the Provost, speaks of it in his time, and the Pila long forecasting man, having some grims for Canterbury be represents notion of Peabody's relationship to as taking their departure therefrom. Hector Dhu, a confirmed bachelor, An inn, tavern, or hotel, to have been jocularly, in a postscript to one of much frequented for several hundred his letters, invited Peabody to come years, speaks well for its accommowith his daughter to Glasgow, offer- dation; it must have adapted itself in ing to introduce them to their High- a very extraordinary manner to the land relation.

various changes of society."

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end Yankees.
-,

Peabody at the time declined the
e invitation, but, from less to more,
e the subject being once introduced
d into their correspondence respect-
2. ing staves and lumber, it was in the
as end pactioned between them, that
Ir Archie, (as he was called in those

days,) our acquaintance, was propo-
Po sed for Miss Octavia Margaret; and,

in consequence, when that young
ed lady was heard to have arrived in
ne London, the aforesaid Archie, or, as
n- he was now called, Archibald, ju.

nior, was advised by his wily father
S to go and push his fortune, by the
e, United Kingdom, with the young
1. lady.

Thus it came to pass, that the Uni-
en ted Kingdom was enriched with all
at these of our dramatis persona, in
is addition to the usual clanjamphry
et that constitute the cargoes of the
te steamers that ply between Leith and
as London.

It happened, however, that the pas-
ce sage was rough and squally, which

, ed Mrs Clatterpenny, in complaining of ne her sickness, assured her compas at nions made her a sore nymph. Mr r- Threeper was speechless, and lay all

day in his bed, crying Oh! oh!"

as often as the steward addressed
do him; but Mr Shortridge, in
gs perils of the voyage, was as gay as
es, a lark, and as thirsty as a duck; for
os he had been on a voyage of pleasure,

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at. like most young men of the Trony gate, to the Craig of Ailsa, where he ok feasted on solan geese, by which, as n- he said himself, he was inured to at seafaring; but his appetite was node Hy improved.

When the vessel reached her moory, ings in the Thames, they somehow 5. got into a hackney-coach together28 perhaps there was a little political at economy in this and they took up as their abode, on the recommendation

CHAPTER II.

vost.”

Our travellers being arrived at the what says young Clatterpenny inn, Mr Shortridge had some doubt, this match of his mother's making from its appearance, if it were ex Mr Threeper was neither shà actly the place which, from the in- adroit, nor intelligent, and of cou ferences of Mr Threeper, he had this declaration of young Shortri been led to expect; but he submit- made no right impression upon h ted to his fate, and the luggage which and he replied, "We anticipate they had brought with them in the difficulty with the young man. hackney-coach was unloaded. While has written to his mother, that waiting for Mrs Clatterpenny, who lady is a divinity, and he has him had some orders to give at the bar, proposed the match, to which I h he fell into conversation with the lent my advice.” advocate, in which he enquired if Mr Shortridge said nothing to t there was any truth in the report, but rubbing his mouth with his ha that their fellow passenger, Mrs Clat- muttered, “ I'm glad to hear terpenny, was heiress to the great though, for I would not like to ma Ardenlochie estates.

a fright." “Yes,” replied Mr Threeper, " if This was not overheard by no nearer relative can be found.” Threeper, who, forgetful of his

"Your news,” said Mr Shortridge, fessional prudence, added, “I

surprises me. I have heard my feared, however, that she will th father

say, when he was the Lord herself away, on one Tompkin Provost of Glasgow, that an old ac- young Virginian, who is now in I quaintance of our house in Vermont don. was the heir; but between ourselves, “ Tompkins !” cried Mr Sh Mr Threeper, how could you allow ridge ; " I know him well; he wa that old woman to come with you? Glasgow, and took a beefer with Thank fortune we are on shore; I when my father was the Lord could not have endured her intolerable clack much longer."

“ There is no doubt," said Thr" Ay,” said Mr Threeper,

er,

“ that it is the same, for he hoarse waves are musical compared been making the tour of Eur to her tongue; but I could not do What sort of a person is he?" well without her; and to let you into

“Not unlike myself,” replied the truth, the random nonsense she Shortridge ; “rather genteelish." is ever talking, is a cloak which con “ The likeness," cried Three ceals both shrewdness and cunning; “cannot be striking ; but hush, moreover, she has a son in London, comes Mrs Clatterpenny reprim between whom and her relation, Pea- ing the negro waiter, who, by the body's daughter, just arrived from is the first of the kind that I America, she is desirous to effect a ever seen.” marriage, to avoid litigation ; for In saying this, the two gentle there is a doubt arising from Mr stepped more apart, and Mrs Peabody's claim to the property, as terpenny entered in great tribula heir-at-law."

speaking behind her to the wa " Peabody! did you say Peabo- who had not, she thought, bee dy?”

attentive to her commands as "Yes," replied Mr Threeper; "we ought. have heard that the same cause has « Black lad,” said she, “

“I brought him across the Atlantic." black lad! what for have ye not

Mr Shortridge looked very much my bits o' boxes up to the bed-c. astonished at this, and added, with er? I tell you to take them up an accent of great wonder, “Do you gay time.” Then turning round know, that it was arranged between observing the gentlemen, she ad my father and this very Peabody, ed them, “ Eh! gentlemen, little that I should go to America and hope for the pleasantrie of seeing court his daughter. Between us, the here; and glad am I, Mr Thre Provost had an eye, I suspect, to that ye are not out of the way, these very Ardenlochie estates. But am almost driven deniented.

" the

a very

of Mr Threeper, at the Talbot Inn, d in the Borough. It has been many 1 hundred years," said he,

celebrated house. Chaucer the poet speaks of it in his time, and the Pilgrims for Canterbury he represents as taking their departure therefrom. An inn, tavern, or hotel, to have been much frequented for several hundred years, speaks well for its accommodation; it must have adapted itself in a very extraordinary manner to the various changes of society."

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