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CONTENTS

OF THE SECOND VOLUME.

al Inquisition—The College, or Seigniory .......................................52

XIII. Conspiracy against the State, by a Doge-Singular Instance of

Weakness and Vanity in a Noble Venetian-New Magistrates to

prevent Luxury-Courtesans.................................. ...............58

XIV. Rigour of Venetian Laws exemplified in the Cases of Antonio Ve-

nier, Carlo Zeno, and young Foscari.........

..................64

XV. The Council of Ten, and the State Inquisitors-Reflections on these

Institutions.........

...................69

XVI. League of Cambray-War with Turks--Antonio Bragadino-Bat-

tle of Lepanta-Disputes with the Pope.............

..76

XVII. Marquis of Bedamar's Conspiracy-False Accusations The Siege

of Candia-The Impatience of a Turkish Emperor-Conclusion of the

Review of the Venetian Government.......

XVIII. Venetian Manners-Opera-Affectation-A Duo-Dancers....89

XIX. No Military Establishment at Venice-What supplies its place..94

XX. Reflections on the Nature of Venetian Government-Gondoleers-

Citizens—The Venetian Subjects on the Terra Firma..............

XXI. Gallantry-Cassinos.........

............99

XXII. Character of Venetians--Customs and UsagesInfluence of Fa.

VOL. II.

b

...........

....83

"..96

XXXIV. Tolentino—The Appennines A Hermit

Umbria--Spoletto153

XXXV. Terni -Narni_.Otricoli--Civita---Castellana--Campania of

Rome........

...........157

XXXVI. Rome--Conversazionis-Cardinal Bernis—The Distress of an

Italian Lady.........

.............................................................................161

XXXVII. Remarks on ancient and modern Rome-The Church of St.

Peter's................................................

.........., 165

XXXVIII. The Ceremony of the Possesso..................................171

XXXIX. Pantheon-Coliseum-Gladiators........

....................................175

XL. The Campidoglio-Forum Romanum-Jews.....

..184

XLI. Ruins_Via Sacra- Tarpeian Rock-Campus Martius–Various

Forums— Trajan's Column..........

... 188

XLII. The Beatification of a Saint ...........

193

XLIII. Character of Modern Italians-Observations on Human Nature

in General-An English Officer-Cause of the Frequency of the Crime

of Murder.........

...196

XLIV. Different Kinds of Punishment Account of an Execution-Souls

in Purgatory......

.....

...202

XLV. The Usual Course with an Antiquarian-An Expeditious Course,

by a Young Englishman-The Villa Borghese...........................208

XLVI. The Morning Study of an Artist-Conversation with Him on that

Subject An Italian Lady and her Confessor-The Lady's Religious

Scruples and Precaution..........................................................

.....217

XLVII. Busts and Statues of distinguished Romansor Heathen Deities

-Passion of the Greeks and Romans for Sculpture-Farnesian Hercu-
les criticised by a Lady-Remarks on that Statue On the Flora--Ef

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fect which the Sight of the Statues of Laocoon and his Sons had on

Two Spectators of Opposite Characters Mr. Lock's Observations on

the same Group—The Antinous—The Appollo....... .................222

Letter XLVIII. The Present Pope-Ganganelli-A Scotch Presbyte.
rian.........

...................231

XLIX. Zeal' of Pius VI-Institution of the Jubilee-Ceremony of Build-

ing up the Holy Door of St. Peter's by the Present Pope-The Ceremo-

ny of High Mass performed by the Pope on Christmas Day-Character

of the Present Pope-He is admired by the Roman Women-The Be-

nediction pronounced in the Grand Area before the Church of St. Peter's

................................................................................................236

L. Presented to the Pope Reflections on the Situation of Sovereigns in

General—The Sovereign Pontiff in Particular..... ...... ..242

LI. Modern Romans—Roman Women compared with those of England

Portrait Painting in Italy, and elsewhere..........

................249

LII. Carnival at Rome-Masquerades and other Amusements in the

Corso-Horse-Races Serious Opera—Great Sensibility in a Young

Woman-Extravagant Expression of a Roman Citizen at the Opera-

A Serenade on Christmas Morning Female Performers prohibited on

the Theatres at Rome-Eunuchs substituted_The Effect on the Minds

Spectators..........

...................

- 255

LIII. Journey from Rome to Naples_Veletri-Otho-Sermonetta-

Peevish Travellers-Monte Circello-Piperno-Fossa Nuova...... 260

LIV. Terracina–Via Appia-Fundi-Gaeta-Illustrious French Rebels
-Bourbon-Minturnæ-Marius--Hannibal.........

...269

LV. Naples, Fortress of St. Elmo-Conversation with a Lady regarding

the Carthusians--Manufactures--Number of Inhabitants..............274,

LVI. Manners.....

............................................................................. 279

LVII. Respect paid to Kings during their Lives-Freedoms used with

their Characters after their Deaths- The King of Naples A Game at

Billiards—Characters of the King and Queen..........

.282

LVIII. The Neapolitan Nobles—The Peasants.............................286

LIX. Citizens--Lawyers--Physicians--Clergy.-Convents--Lazzaroni..290

LX. Herculaneum-Portici— Pompeia................

.295

LXI. Poetical Rehearsers in the Streets of Naples-Street Orators and

Historians improuvisatories—Signora Corilla-Sensibility of Italians

-English Gentlemen of the Ton--A Neapolitan Mountebank......303

LXII. A Visit to Mount Vesuvius.....................

............................311
LXIII. Observations on the Pulmonary Consumption...................

...317

LXIV. Neapolitan and English Customs and Characters criticized and

compared, in a Conversation between two English Gentlemen.........335

LXV. The Liquefaction of St. Januarius's Blood-Procession, Ceremo-

nies, Anxiety of the People Their Preposterous Abuse of the Saint-

Observation of a Roman Catholic...........

..342

LXVI. The Tomb of Virgil-Pausilippo-A Neapolitan Valet--Grotta

del Cane-Campi Phlegrei, Solfaterra, Monte Nuova, &c.-Puzzolia-

Baia-Cumæ......,

.......350

.............................

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LETTER LXVII. Palace of Casserta-African Slaves-Gardens-Fortifica-

tions.........
........................................................

.......355

LXVIII. Character of the Archduchess-Attend the King and Queen on

a Visit to Four Nunneries-Entertainments there-Effect of the Climate

on the Constitution of Nuns and Others............

..358

LXIX. Tivoli...

.........363

LXX. Frescati and Albano-Dialogue between an English and Scotch

Gentleman...........

..................... ................................369

LXXI. Florence-The English Minister-Grand Duke and Duchess

Florentines Particular Species of Virtù......................................

..378

LXXII. Gallery-Dialogue between an Antiquarian and a Young Man

concerning the Arrotino-The Tribuna—The Gallery of Portraits..382

LXXIII. State of the Common People, particularly the Peasants in Italy

Of Roman Catholic Clergy-Clergy in General..........................

..387

LXXIV. Manners—The Count Albany....

.........................

LXXV. Cicisbeism...........

LXXVI. The Same Subject continued....

..403

LXXVII. Commerce-Jews-Actors—The Chapel of St. Lorenzo-The

Rich not envied by the Poor-The Palazzo Pitti-Observations on the

Madonna della Seggiola...........

........... 409

LXXVIII. A Public Discourse by a Professor at the Academy of Arts at

Bologna- Procession of Corpus Domini-Modena-Parma-Different

Opinions respecting a Famous Picture of Correggio..................... 413

LXXIX. Milan- The Cathedral-Museum-Manners........... 418

LXXX. Turin-St. Ambrose-A Procession_Mount Cenis-Modane-

Aiguebelle-Hannibal's Passage into Italy................

LXXXI. Journey from Geveva to Besançon-Observation of a French

Peasant_Of an Old Woman-Remarks of a French Friseur on the

English Nation

...............................................................428

LXXXII. The Marquis de F.

..431

LXXXIII. Reflections on Foreign Travel....................

..436

A

VIEW

OT

SOCIETY AND MANNERS

IN

ITALY.

LETTER J.

DEAR SIR,

Venice, Having left Vienna, we proceeded through the duchies of Stiria, Carinthia, and Carniola, to Venice. Notwithstanding the mountainous nature of those countries, the roads are remarkably good. They were formed originally at a vast expense of labour to the inhabitants, but in such a durable manner, that it requires no great trouble to keep them in repair, to which all necessary attention seems to be paid. Some of the mountains are covered with wood, but more generally they are quite bare. Among them are many fields and valleys, fit for pasturage and the cultivation of grain ; a few of these valleys are remarkably fertile, particularly in the duchy of Carniola. The bowels of the earth abound in lead, copper, and iron. Stirian steel is reckoned excellent; and the little town of Idra, in Carniola, is famous for the quicksilver mines in its neighbourhood.

It has been a matter of controversy among the learned, (for the learned dispute about many things which the ignorant think of little importance), by what road the original inhabitants came,. who first peopled Italy? And it has been decided by some, that they must have entered by this

very country of Carniola. These gentlemen lay it down as an axiom, that the first inhabitants of every

VOL II.

A

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