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Page 217 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from...
Page lxxxv - Siam shall not go and obstruct or interrupt commerce in the States of Tringano and Calantan. English merchants and subjects shall have trade and intercourse in future with the same facility and freedom as they have heretofore had, and the English shall not go and molest, attack, or disturb those States upon any pretence whatever.
Page lxxxiii - Chief; who shall depute some of his officers, and people from his frontier posts, to go with the men, belonging to the English Chief, and point out and settle the mutual boundaries, so that they may be ascertained on both sides in a friendly manner. If a Siamese Chief entertain a doubt as to any boundary, that has not been ascertained, the Chief on the side of the Siamese, must send a letter with some men, and people from his frontier...
Page lxxviii - Sheriff, or other minister to whom the said writs shall be directed, shall be commanded to have six or more of the jurors named in such writs, or in the panels...
Page lxxxvii - Government not require such fire-arms, shot, or gunpowder, the merchants must re-export the whole of them. With exception to such warlike stores, and paddy and rice, merchants subjects of the English, and merchants at Bangkok, may buy and sell without the intervention of any other person, and with freedom and facility.
Page lxxxiv - If a merchant desire to go and trade in any place or country belonging to the English or Siamese , and his ship , boat, or junk meet with any injury whatever, the English or Siamese officers shall afford adequate assistance and protection. Should any vessel belonging to the Siamese or English be wrecked in any place or country, where the English or Siamese may collect any of the property belonging to such vessel, the English or Siamese officers shall make proper...
Page lxxxiii - Siamese do anything that may offend the English, the English shall not go and injure such place or country, but first report the matter to the Siamese, who will examine into it with truth and sincerity; and if the fault lie with the Siamese, the Siamese shall punish according to the fault.
Page vi - ... admitted to any peremptory challenge above the number of twenty. (14) There shall be no award that any of the by-standers be sworn upon the jury in any case, except it be by consent of all the parties in the case. (15) No verdict shall be set aside, or in any way affected, for any cause which might have been cause of challenge at the trial ; nor shall any writ of attaint be prosecuted against any jury or jurors for their verdict, nor against any party who shall have judgment on such verdict ;...
Page lxxxv - Asiatic merchants of the English countries, not being Burmese, Peguers, or descendants of Europeans, shall be allowed to trade freely overland and by means of the rivers. Asiatic merchants, not being Burmese, Peguers, or descendants of Europeans, desiring to enter into and trade with the Siamese dominions from the countries of Mergui, Tavoy, Tenasserim, and Ye, which are now subject to the English, will be allowed to do so freely, overland and by water, upon the English furnishing them with proper...
Page clxv - It is said to be useful also in spasmodic affections of various kinds,, asthma, periodical head-aches, and general irritability ; also as an application to ulcerated and irritable surfaces. The web should be that of the black spider, found in cellars and dark and damp places. Several cases of great professional interest were communicated to the meeting, and...

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