Sanitary Ramblings: Being Sketches and Illustrations of Bethnal Green

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Page 104 - I saw several of the passengers dropping through the bridge into the great tide that flowed underneath it; and, upon further examination, perceived there were innumerable trap-doors that lay concealed in the bridge, which the passengers no sooner trod upon, but they fell through them into the tide, and immediately disappeared.
Page 104 - But tell me further, said he, what thou discoverest on it. I see multitudes of people passing over it, said I, and a black cloud hanging on each end of it. As I looked more attentively, I saw several of the passengers dropping through the bridge, into the great tide that flowed underneath it ; and upon...
Page 104 - I was counting the arches, the genius told me that this bridge consisted at first of a thousand arches; but that a great flood swept away the rest, and left the bridge in the ruinous condition I now beheld it. ' But tell me further,' said he, 'what thou discoverest on it.' 'I see multitudes of people passing over it,' said I, ' and a black cloud banging on each end of it.
Page 28 - Along the centre of the street is an open, sunk gutter, in which filth of every kind is allowed to accumulate and putrefy. A mud-bank on each side commonly keeps the contents of this gutter in their situation ; but sometimes, and especially in wet weather, the gutter overflows; its contents are poured into the neighbouring houses, and the street is rendered nearly impassable. The privies are close upon the footpatli of the street, being separated from it only by a parting of wood.
Page 28 - A mud-bank on each side commonly keeps the contents of this gutter in their situation ; but sometimes, and especially in wet weather, the gutter overflows ; its contents are poured into the neighbouring houses, and the street is rendered nearly impassable The street is wholly without drainage of any kind. Fever constantly breaks out in it...
Page 4 - neath the wall — And stepped from earth to hell. — The light of heaven, The common air, was narrow, gross, and dun ; The tiles did drop from the eaves; the unhinged doors Tottered o'er inky pools, where reeked and curdled The offal of a life ; the gaunt-haunched swine Growled at their christened playmates o'er the scraps. Shrill mothers cursed ; wan children wailed ; sharp coughs...
Page 4 - Owing to the vastness of London," says Mr. Marlin, in one of his Sanitary Reports, "owing to the moral gulf which there separates the various classes of ics inhabitants, its several quarters may be designated as assemblages of towns rather than as one city ; and so it is, in a social sense and on a smaller scale, in other towns : the rich know nothing of the poor — the mass of misery that festers beneath the affluence of London and of the great towns is not known to their wealthy occupants.
Page 1 - DISEASES, chiefly of Soldiers and Seamen ; on the means used to simulate or produce them, and on the best Modes of discovering Impostors; being the Prize Essay in the Class of Military Surgery in the University of Edinburgh. 8vo. cloth, 9s.
Page 104 - ... died at their own residences under 5 years of age. One in 15 of the deaths occurred between 5 and 10, the age when employment commences. The proportion of deaths which occurred between 10 and 15, the period at which full employment usually takes place, is I in 60 only.
Page 85 - ... and at such a distance from any well or watercourse as will preclude any risk of the contamination of the water therein , the carcase being buried at a depth of not less than six feet below the surface...

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