An Account of the Mutinies in Oudh and of the Siege of the Lucknow Residency: With Some Observations on the Condition of the Province of Oudh and on the Causes of the Mutiny of the Bengal Army

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Richard Bentley, 1858 - Oudh (India) - 484 pages
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The Book was great reading. The man for the situation, who was clear in understanding about the existing malady in the society in Oudh and the maladministration of the native ruler prior to the annexation of the country. The British rule has helped the real proprietors of the land, who lost their possessions due to the machinations of the Talukdhars in connivance with the King's tax officials, to repossess their hereditary holdings and live in peace. The land settlement ensured the fugitives who, on loss of their possessions by force and legal deceit to the talukdhars, turned thugs and decoits, able to return to normal life; thus free the lawless land to be brought under effective productive usage. This was a great achievement for the people of Oudh.
A little realization on the part of the Company British Authorities at large to understand the natives and respect their religions; to tutor the natives the concept of Christianity as a caring religion through education and not proselytize by coercion as an instrument of empire, would have saved the life of Europeans; who got butchered in an alien land, far away from birth place, forfeiting even a proper burial in most of the cases.
N.V. Sundaram
 

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Page 2 - That young lady had a talent for describing the involvements and feelings and characters of ordinary life which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with. The Big Bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going, but the exquisite touch which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting from the truth of the description and the sentiment is denied to me.
Page 7 - Creasy to select for military description those few battles of which, in the words of Hallam, * a contrary event would have essentially varied the drama of the world in all its subsequent scenes.
Page 260 - If you hope to save this force, no time must be lost in pushing forward. We are daily being attacked s 2 by the enemy, who are within a few yards of our defences.
Page 312 - The Major-General, therefore, in gratitude for and admiration of the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion; and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oude, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer.
Page 17 - This book is one of which it is not too high praise to assert, that it approaches as nearly to perfection, in its own line, as any historical work perhaps ever did.
Page 300 - ... forth in a succession of deafening cheers. From every pit, trench, and battery, from behind the sandbags piled on shattered houses, from every post still held by a few gallant spirits, rose cheer on cheer ; even from the hospital many of the wounded crawled forth to join in that glad shout of welcome to those who had so bravely come to our assistance. It was a moment never to be forgotten.
Page 312 - Major-General, therefore," the order proceeded, " in gratitude for, and admiration of, the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion, and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oudh, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer. On the relief of Lucknow the Major-General will resume his position at the head of the forces.
Page 80 - Thucydides ; but it is impossible to shut one's eyes to the fact that the...
Page 5 - Professor Browne is not only a classical scholar, but one of the most graceful of English modern writers. In clearness, purity, and elegance of style, his compositions are unsurpassed '• and his sketches of the lives and works of the great authors of antiquity are models of refined taste and sound criticism. We esteem very highly the value of a work like this. It is the result of great research and profound study, but it is also popular and entertaining.
Page 125 - I was 300 yards off at the utmost. Poor Lysaght was kneeling out in the open ground, with his hands folded across his chest, and, though not using his firearms, the cowardly wretches would not go up to the spot until they shot him ; and then rushing up, they killed the wounded and children, butchering them in a most cruel way. With the exception of the drummer boy, every one was killed of the above list, and besides, poor good Thomason and one or two clerks. They denuded the bodies of their clothes,...

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