The Harleian miscellany; or, A collection of ... pamphlets and tracts ... in the late earl of Oxford's library, Volume 2

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Page 132 - The place of the Scripture which he read was this : He was led as a sheep to the slaughter ; and like a lamb dumb before his shearer, so opened he not his mouth : In his humiliation his judgment was taken away and who shall declare his generation? for his life is taken from the earth.
Page 354 - To be a king and wear a crown is a thing more glorious to them that see it than it is pleasant to them that bear it. For myself I was never so much enticed with the glorious name of a King or royal authority of a Queen as delighted that God hath made me his instrument to maintain his truth and glory and to defend this kingdom as I said from peril, dishonour, tyranny and oppression.
Page 9 - God, and with the testimony of good consciences, by one uniform manner of writing under their hands and seals, and by their several oaths voluntarily taken, joined themselves together in one bond and association, to with* stand and revenge to the uttermost all such malicious actions and attempts against her Majesty's most royal person.
Page 10 - ... and in supporting and defending the succession of the crown, according to an act made in the first year of the reign of King William and Queen Mary, intituled, an act declaring the rights and liberties of the subject, and settling the succession of the crown.
Page 355 - I ascribe any of these things to myself or my sexly weakness, I were not worthy to live, and of all most unworthy of the mercies I have received at God's hands, but to God only and wholly all is given and ascribed.
Page 355 - Mr. Secretary, and you of My council, that, before these gentlemen depart into their countries, you bring them all to kiss My hand.
Page 107 - Lord, how long thy servant hath laboured to them for peace, but how proudly they prepare themselves unto battle. Arise, therefore ; maintain thine own cause, and judge thou between her and her enemies. She seeketh not her own honour, but thine...
Page 355 - And though you have had and may have many mightier and wiser princes sitting in this seat, yet you never had nor shall have any that will love you better.
Page 129 - IMPRINTED AT LONDON by the Deputies of Christopher Barker, Printer to the Queenes most excellent Maiestie, 1599.
Page 158 - ... musketshot of the enemy, inasmuch, as that was the only way to succour the ships of their friends with the greater damage of the enemy. This was well performed by the Ark, the Elizabeth Jonas, the galleon Leicester, the Golden Lion, the Victory, the Mary Rose, the Dread-nought, and the Swallow. Which thing the Duke of Medina perceiving, he also came forth with sixteen of his best galleons, to hinder and impeach the Englishmen in the defence of the Triumph, seeming in this case to pretend, that...

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