The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Csar, to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 11

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Inskeep & Bradford, 1810 - Great Britain
 

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Page 132 - The next object that employed the attention of the commons was to explain and amend a law made in the last session for granting to his majesty several rates and duties upon offices and pensions. The directions specified in the former act for levying this imposition having been found inconvenient in many respects, new regulations were now established, importing, that those deductions should be paid into the hands of receivers appointed by the king for that purpose; that all sums deducted under this...
Page 330 - Greenwich hospital; nay, should they die in the course of the voyage, it would be lost to their heirs and executors, who, being ignorant of their title, could not possibly claim within the time limited. LIX. A committee having been appointed to inquire into the original standards of weights and measures in the kingdom of England, to consider the laws relating thereto, and to report their observations thereupon, together with their' opinion of the most effectual means for ascertaining and enforcing...
Page 243 - Poleagers for me, 1 will not do it ; and I renounce (as I informed you a month ago I would do) meddling directly or indirectly with any thing whatever that may have relation to your administration, whether civil or military. For I had rather go and command the...
Page 263 - ... began with great vivacity ; and the action became very hot towards the right, where six regiments of English infantry, and two battalions of Hanoverian guards, not only bore the whole brunt of the French carabineers and gendarmerie, but absolutely broke every body of horse and foot that advanced to attack them on the left and in the centre.
Page 107 - You receive this as an acknowledgment of your punctuality as to the time and place of meeting on Sunday last, though it was owing to you it answered no purpose. The pageantry of being armed, and the ensign of your order were useless, and too conspicuous.
Page 453 - The genius of Cervantes was transfused into the novels of Fielding, who painted the characters, and ridiculed the follies of life, with equal strength, humour, and propriety.
Page 122 - Certain it is, that in these branches of traffic, the want of geneva may be supplied by spirits distilled from sugars and molasses. After all, it must be owned, that the good and salutary effects of the prohibition were visible in every part of the kingdom, and no evil consequence ensued, except a diminution of the revenue in this article : a consideration which, at all times, ought to be sacrificed to the health and morals of the people...
Page 442 - Amelia might be called ; but before she could reach the apartment he had expired. An attempt was made to bleed him. but without effect; and indeed his malady was far beyond the reach of art : for when the cavity of the thorax or chest was opened, and inspected by the...
Page 193 - The whole armament having abandoned the design on Martinique, directed their course to Guadaloupe, another of the Caribbee Islands, lying at the distance of thirty leagues to the westward, about fifteen leagues in length, and twelve in breadth ; divided into two parts by a small channel, which the inhabitants cross in a ferry-boat. The western division is known by the name of Basseterre ; and here the metropolis stands, defended by the citadel and other fortifications. The eastern part, called Grandterre,...
Page 70 - German casuist, with one hundred and fifty thousand armed men in his retinue. Be this as it will, Mr. Ponickau, the Saxon minister, immediately after this tragedy was acted, without waiting for his master's orders, presented a memorial to the diet of the empire, complaining of it as an action reserved for the history of the war which the king of Prussia had kindled in Germany, to be transmitted to future ages. He affirmed that, in execution of Schmettau's orders, the soldiers had dispersed themselves...

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