Modern Cookery, for Private Families: Reduced to a System of Easy Practice, in a Series of Carefully Tested Receipts, in which the Principles of Baron Liebig and Other Eminent Writers Have Been as Much as Possible Applied and Explained

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1860 - Cooking - 643 pages
 

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Page 479 - BAKED CUSTARD. Mix a quart of new milk with eight well-beaten eggs, strain the mixture through a fine sieve, and sweeten it with from five to eight ounces of sugar, according to the taste; add a small pinch of salt, and pour the custard into a deep dish with or without a lining or rim of paste, grate nutmeg or lemon rind over the top, and bake it in a very slow oven from twenty to thirty minutes, or longer, should it not be firm in the centre. A custard, if well made, and properly baked, will...
Page 133 - Distrust the condiment that bites so soon; But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault To add a double quantity of salt; Four times the spoon with oil of Lucca crown, And twice with vinegar procured from town; And lastly o'er the flavoured compound toss A magic soupcon of anchovy sauce.
Page 133 - Distrust the condiment which bites so soon ; But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault, To add a double quantity of salt...
Page 264 - Till a little practice has been gained, it will perhaps be better to bone these joints before proceeding further ; but after they are once detached from it, the whole of the body may easily be separated from the flesh and taken out entire : only the neck-bones and merrythought will then remain to be removed. The bird thus prepared may either be restored to its original form, by filling the legs and wings with forcemeat, and the body with the livers of two or three fowls...
Page 264 - ... and the various other ingredients we have named, so placed that it shall be of equal thickness in every part; then tightly rolled, bound firmly together with a fillet of broad tape, wrapped in a thin pudding-cloth, closely tied at both ends, and dressed as follows: Put it into a braising-pan, stewpan, or thick iron saucepan, bright in the inside, and fitted as nearly as may be to its size; add all the...
Page 255 - ... blackened or rusty. Lay it into a suitable kettle and cover it plentifully with cold water ; bring it very slowly to boil, and clear off the scum, which will be thrown up in great abundance. So soon as the water has been cleared from this, draw the pot to the edge of the stove, that the ham may be simmered slowly but steadily, until it is tender. On no account allow it to boil fast. When it can be probed very easily with a sharp skewer, lift it out, strip off the skin, and return the ham to the...
Page 256 - ... herbs, and the smallest bit of garlic. Let the whole simmer gently from four to five hours, or longer should the ham be very large. When perfectly tender, lift it out, take off the rind", and sprinkle over it some fine crumbs, or some raspings of bread mixed with a little finely minced parsley.
Page 303 - ... cayenne well mixed together. It is better to limit the spice to this quantity in the first instance, and to increase afterwards either of the three kinds to the taste of the parties to whom the meat is to be served.f We do not find half a teaspoonful of cayenne and nearly two teaspoonsful of mace, more than is generally approved. After the spice is added, keep the meat often turned from the sides to the middle of the mortar, that it may be seasoned equally in every part. When perfectly pounded,...
Page 264 - ... mixed with alternate layers of parboiled tongue freed from the rind, fine sausage-meat, or veal forcemeat, or thin slices of the nicest bacon, or aught else of good flavour, which will give a marbled appearance to the fowl when it is carved; and then be sewn up and trussed as usual; or the legs and wings may be drawn inside the body, and the bird being first flattened on a table, may be covered with sausage-meat, and the various other ingredients we have named, so placed that it shall be of equal...
Page 415 - ... eggs; let the mixture cool, and then pour it into a thickly-buttered basin, or mould, which should be quite full; tie a buttered paper and a floured cloth over it, and boil the pudding exactly an hour; let it stand for two or three minutes before it is turned out, and serve it with sweet sauce, fruit syrup, or a compote of fresh fruit. An ounce and a half of candied...

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