Page images
PDF
EPUB

A BRIEF EXAMINATION

OF THE PROOFS,

BE WHICH THE NEY. MR. BOARDMAN ATTEMPTS TO SUSTAIN HIS CHARGE, THAT

A LARGE AND LEARNED BODY OF THE CLERGY OF THE
CHURCH (OF ENGLAND) “HAVE RETURNED TO

SOME OF THE WORST ERRORS OF POPERY ;;'

WITH

A WORD OR TWO,

AS TO HIS ATTEMPT, WITHOUT PROOF,

TO CAST THE SUSPICION OF POPERY

OK TRE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

BY THE RIGHT REV. GEORGE W. DOANE, D.D., LL.D.,

[blocks in formation]

This calumny (of Popery) hath been thrown upon the greatest lights of our Church;

-and will be the fate of many more, who shall zealously contend for the primitive doctrines and discipline of Christianity.But yet, in the day of any trial, the men of this character will be found the best defenders of the Church of England, and the boldest champions against the corruptions of the Church of Rome.—Nelson's Life of Bishop Bull, Burton's edition, p. 311.

Our Reformation was called Popish by Geneva; our Church, Popish by Calvin and Beza, and the Puritans in our own country. Popery, was the charge against all the Bishops in the reign of Elizabeth, of Charles I., and of James II. It has ever been the cry of both parties against the greatest and best of our divines, as often as they have stood forward to maintain against Romanism on one hand, and Puritanism on the other, the rights, ceremonies, or doctrines of the Catholic Church of England. It was the cry against Jewell, Whitgift, Hooker, Bramhall, Andrews, Hall, Laud, Montague, Cosin, Wren, Taylor, Sherlock, Sancroft, Kettlewell, Hickes, Brett, Dodwell, Leslie, Ken, and Butlér. Even Chillingworth did not escape the insinuation. And last, though not the least surprising, Baxter himself, “as the reward of all his labours from the separating Independent," was charged " with having done more to strengthen Popery than over was dono by any Papist."-London Quarterly Review, 126.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

BRIEF EXAMINATION.

THE CHARGE.

These facts are sufficiently startling, but there is another feature in the present religious state of Great Britain, equally ominous, namely, The Oxford Tract Movement. Romanism could make little headway in that country, if the ministry of the established Church were all such men as Bickersteth, and Melville, and Henry Blunt, and the Noels. But unhappily, A LARGE AND LEARNED BODY OF THE CLERGY, (embracing the leading ecclesiastical teachers at the ancient University of Oxford,) HAVE RETURNED TO SOME OF THE WORST ERRORS OF POPERY; and are employing both the pulpit and the press, with prodigious efficiency, to give them currency among the people.

This state of things in England must operate powerfully upon this country. The increase of Romanism there, can hardly fail of giving a fresh impulse to it here. The Oxford Tract leaven is already beginning to work in our cities; and Roman PRIESTS ARE

PUBLICLY FELICITATING THEIR PEOPLE ON THE PROGRESS THEIR

DOCTRINES ARE MAKING IN THE BOSOM OF A PROTESTANT CHURCH.

- The Rev. Mr. Boardman's Lecture, pp. 20, 21.

THE CALL FOR PROOF.

I call upon you distinctly, and by name, for your proofs, that "a large and learned body of the Clergy" of the Church of Eng. land, ("embracing the leading ecclesiastical teachers at the ancient University of Oxford,) have returned to some of the worst errors of Popery, and are employing both the pulpit and the press with prodigious efficiency, to give them currency among the people.

Your reference to the state of things in this country is more guarded. By " the Oxford Tract leaven,” however, I must suppose you to mean, from the connection in which you use it, the adoption of

some of the worst errors of Popery:” more especially as you state that the “ Roman Priests are publicly felicitating their people on the progress their doctrines are making in the bosom of a Protestant Church;" by which you mean, doubtless, the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America. Adopting this interpretation of your language, I call on you distinctly, and by name, for your proofs of the adoption of " some of the worst errors of Poperyinto the bosomof that Church; and of the progress in it of any

doctrines,which, in your judgment, would justly authorise the Roman Priests," as such, in really, as well as "publicly, felicitating their people.I say, really; for I am sure you are not ignorant of the devices of Popery; how she adapts herself to times and circumstances, taking cameleon-like the hue of every hour, yet all the while in purpose and intent unchanging and unchangeable; how skilful and how prompt she is in that old trick of tyrants, to divide and conquer; nay, how she has put on the very face and garb of Puritanism, that she might undermine what she

'See a note to a very able article, “Romanism in Ireland," written, without a doubt, at Oxford, in the London Quarterly Review, No. cxxxiii. The statement there made, that Romish priests did go to England in 1566, and thereabouts, disguised as Presbyterians, Independents, and Anabaptists, by order from Rome; and did teach the people, in these assumed characters, as Faithful Commin-one of the most active of them-confessed, lo hate the liturgy, to pray extempore, to despise ceremonies, to profess tender consciences, and to call a set form of words, “the mass translated,” is familiar to all well informed Church

« PreviousContinue »