The Modern Part of an Universal History: From the Earliest Account of Time, Volume 24

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S. Richardson, ... [et. al.], 1759 - World history

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Page 44 - ... that, for the future, the confines between the dominions of his Britannic Majesty, and those of his most Christian Majesty, in that part of the world, shall be fixed irrevocably by a line drawn along the middle of the river Mississippi, from its source to the river Iberville, and from thence, by a line drawn along the middle of this river, and the lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain, to the sea...
Page 82 - ... are never feen in this hot climate, but hail is fometimes very large. The dews are here fo great within land, that in a morning the water drops from the leaves of the trees, as if it had rained ; and a man riding in the night, will find his cloaths and hair very wet in a fhort time ; but there are feldom any fogs in the plains or fandy places near the fea.
Page 15 - ... and when he can find none on the ground, he looks out for a tree well loaded, which, with a great deal of pains, he climbs; and in order to...
Page 15 - ... as are even infupportable to his purfuer, who foon quits him and even flies beyond the hearing of his horrid noife. Nor is it only during the time he is in motion that he makes thefe cries ; he repeats them while he refts himfelf, continuing a long time motionlefs before he takes another march.
Page 74 - September, to take in provisions and •water, with great part of their lading, and for the convenience of returning to Spain in a body. A continual fair is held till their departure, which generally happens before the end of the month, when proclamation is made, forbidding any...
Page 52 - ... the first Dutch war, 1664, granted New York, the Jerseys and Penselvania, to his brother James duke of York, who sent over a squadron of men of war, and land forces, who reduced New York; the other places settled by Dutch, and Swedes, also submitted: and, these countries were confirmed to the English by the Dutch, at the next treaty of peace between the two nations. New York is situate about 41 degrees north latitude and 74 degrees west longitude from London, upon the south end of an island,...
Page 18 - Negroes bodies, that they may be upon their guard ; many, on the divers being in danger, have thrown themfelves into...
Page 61 - The meadow grounds, which are all well watered, yield excellent grafs, and breed great quantities oí large and fmall cattle ; and where the arable land is well manured, it produces large and rich crops, the mountains abound with coal mines, and fome, we are told, of filver and other metals, though we have not learned that any great advantage has been made of them. The marihy grounds, which are likewife very exteniive, fwarm with otters, beavers, isff.
Page 81 - ... grow in fuch a barren foil, fo thick together among the rocks ; but the trees fend down their fibrous roots into the crannies of the rocks, where, here and there, they meet with fmall receptacles, of rain-water, which nourifli their roots.
Page 15 - ... as the trophies of his victory. Among the great variety of animals in this country, one of the moft remarkable is the Perico Ligero, or nimble Peter, an ironical name given it on account of its extreme fluggifhnefs and floth.

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