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Random House, Oct 6, 2009 - Fiction - 272 pages
21 Reviews

A young English biographer is working on a book about the late writer, John Coetzee. He plans to focus on a period in the seventies when, the biographer senses, Coetzee was 'finding his feet as a writer'. He embarks on a series of interviews with people who were important to Coetzee - a married woman with whom he had an affair, his favourite cousin Margot, a Brazilian dancer whose daughter had English lessons with him, former friends and colleagues. Thus emerges a portrait of the young Coetzee as an awkward, bookish individual, regarded as an outsider within the family. His insistence on doing manual work, his long hair and beard, and rumours that he writes poetry evoke nothing but suspicion in the South Africa of the time.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stef7sa - LibraryThing

It takes a great author to make you read a book which' subject (the author's life) you do not like form the outset, let alone the form (interviews)from start to finish with interest ... It is well ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - whitewavedarling - LibraryThing

What a strange and wandering story, amounting to something both pedestrian and fascinating, and somewhat unnerving. Coetzee's picture of (himself? a fictional version of himself? a writer who only ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

J.M. Coetzee’s work includes Waiting for the Barbarians, Life & Times of Michael K, Boyhood, Youth, Disgrace, Summertime, The Childhood of Jesus and, most recently, The Schooldays of Jesus. He was the first author to win the Booker Prize twice and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003.

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