Source-book of English History: For the Use of Schools and Readers

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Elizabeth Kimball Kendall
Macmillan, 1900 - Great Britain - 483 pages
 

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Page 229 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast plough'd.
Page 228 - While round the armed bands Did clap their bloody hands ; He nothing common did, or mean, Upon that memorable scene, But with his keener eye The axe's edge did try ; Nor called the gods with vulgar spite To vindicate his helpless right, But bowed his comely head Down, as upon a bed.
Page 309 - We shall be forced ultimately to retract; let us retract while we can, not when we must. I say we must necessarily undo these violent oppressive acts: they must be repealed— you will repeal them; I pledge myself for it, that you will in the end repeal them; I stake my reputation on it: I will consent to be taken for an idiot if they are not finally repealed.
Page 258 - Oh ! had he been content to serve the crown With virtues only proper to the gown, Or had the rankness of the soil been freed From cockle that oppressed the noble seed, David for him his tuneful harp had strung And Heaven had wanted one immortal song. But wild ambition loves to slide, not stand, And Fortune's ice prefers to Virtue's land.
Page 406 - How humble, yet how hopeful, he could be ; How, in good fortune and in ill, the same ; Nor bitter in success, nor boastful he, Thirsty for gold, nor feverish for fame.
Page 5 - ... the storms of rain and snow prevail abroad ; the sparrow, I say, flying in at one door, and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry storm ; but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, into the dark winter from which he had emerged. So this life of man appears for a short space, but of what went before, or what is to follow, we are utterly ignorant. If, therefore, this new doctrine contains something more certain, it seems...
Page 257 - Got, while his soul did huddled notions try, And born a shapeless lump, like anarchy. In friendship false, implacable in hate, Resolved to ruin or to rule the state...
Page 250 - Having staid, and in an hour's time seen the fire rage every way ; and nobody, to my sight, endeavouring to quench it, but to remove their goods, and leave all to the Fire...
Page 255 - Of whatsoe'er descent their godhead be, Stock, stone, or other homely pedigree, In his defence his servants are as bold As if he had been born of beaten gold. The Jewish Rabbins, though their enemies, In this conclude them honest men and wise ; For 'twas their duty, all the learned think, T" espouse his cause by whom they eat and drink.
Page 310 - If the Ministers thus persevere in misadvising and misleading the King, I will not say that they can alienate the affections of his subjects from his crown ; but I will affirm that they will make the crown not worth his wearing. 1 will not say that the King is betrayed ; but I will pronounce that the kingdom is undone.

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