The poems of George Heath, selected and arranged by J. Badnall. Memoir by F. Redfern. Mem. ed

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Page 1 - Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice.
Page 30 - Now, for this consecrated Fount Of murmuring, sparkling, living love, What have I ? shall I dare to tell ? A comfortless and hidden WELL. A Well of love — it may be deep — I trust it is, — and never dry : What matter ? if the Waters sleep In silence and obscurity. — Such change, and at the very door Of my fond Heart, hath made me poor.
Page 1 - And nights devoid of ease. Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction' That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice. And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares that infest...
Page 6 - Gorgeous flowerets in the sunlight shining ; Blossoms flaunting in the eye of day, Tremulous leaves, with soft and silver lining Buds that open only to decay ! Brilliant hopes, all woven in gorgeous tissues, Flaunting gaily in the golden light ; Large desires, with most uncertain issues, Tender wishes, blossoming at night ! These in flowers and men are more than seeming Workings are they of the self-same powers, Which the Poet, in no idle dreaming, Seeth in himself, and in the flowers.
Page 21 - After five years' suffering. Fell a victim to that disease, May 5, 1869, aged 25 yean, " His lifo is a fragment — a broken clue — His harp had a musical string or two, The tension was great, and they sprang and flew, And a few brief strains — a scattered few — Are all that remain to mortal view Of the marvellous song the young man knew.
Page 151 - Lustre round thy beauties' bloom ; Ah ! should all the gifts and graces Gather round thee and conspire In thy form to fix their essence, Flush thy face with spirit-fire ; Nay ! shouldst thou in tears, forgetting Beauty-love is calm and proud, Shouldst thou humble thee, and bow thee Where I once so meekly bowed : Having once deceived me, never, Never more, whate'er thy mien, Couldst thou be to me the being That thou mightest once have been. No, alas ! thy tears might give me Less of pride, and less...
Page 150 - ... free ; Doff a love, and don another. In a twilight like to thee. No ! I sooner far would suffer All the agony of heart — Ay, an age of desolation — Than be fickle as thou art. For it proves to me, my spirit Has not lost the stamp divine ; That my nature is not shallow, Is not base and mean as thine. Neither think thou that my being Yearns towards thee even yet ; That a smile of thine would banish All I never may forget ; That a look of thine would make...

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