A treatise on equitation, or the art of horsemanship

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Page 200 - a man had been carrying a stone, too heavy to be pleasant, in one hand, would he not find much ease by shifting it into the other ? Thus, after a jockey has been riding over his horse's fore legs for a couple of miles, must it not be a great relief to him when he sits back in his saddle, and, as it were, divides the weight more equally? But caution is required," he adds, " to preserve a due equilibrium, so as not to disturb the action of a tired horse.
Page 235 - ... at once. A man that rides by the force of his knees alone, shaking his arms and hands, although he rides his distance in the same period of time that the good rider would, yet he cannot be said to ride his horse, or to have any part of his body in the proper equilibrium...
Page 25 - ... the many authors who have wrote on this subject, Sir William Hope mistakes as to the Spanish horse. No body at present makes use of them, and they have never been known to get any thing good in England. But the Arabians or Barbs are much the best; tho' of late years our breed is spoiled in England in all sorts of horses, by beginning to make use of them too early. By this means we never know the goodness of a horse, while some people attribute to an infirmity, either in the horse, or the mare,...
Page 200 - But caution is required,' he adds, ' to preserve a due equilibrium, so as not to disturb the action of a tired horse.' Without doubt, this celebrated performer imbibed many excellent lessons from his father, but he is considered to be the more powerful jockey of the two.
Page 215 - ... some elevation, and give a kick to the animal even before being fairly upon it. If a groom attend at mounting, he ought not to be suffered to touch the reins, but only that part of the bridle which comes down the cheek. In dismounting, the whip is to be returned into the left hand; the right hand takes hold of the rein above the left ; the right foot quits the stirrup ; the left hand slides forward on the rein, to about twelve inches from the saddle, feeling the horse's mouth very lightly; the...
Page 235 - ... particularly to be pointed out to a young man, and cannot be too often repeated, that, to become an easy, elegant, or proper horseman, he must learn to ride with comfort and pleasure to his horse as well as to himself; he must learn to seek his balance from his hip upwards, to keep the body with a slight inclination backwards from the perpendicular, and balance himself thus gradually on his horse in all the different paces ; which, of course, cannot be expected all at once. A man that rides by...
Page 234 - The man who rides with the aid of the proper equilibrium," says Colonel Peters, "will, in case of necessity, know when to apply the strength he has retained with a steady, light hand, and govern every motion according as he finds it necessary for his purpose ; play light with his own weight upon the saddle (by a gentle spring in the instep of both feet on the stirrups), with an easy pressure of both thighs, knees, and calves of the legs. When the horse jumps or plunges, then these aids...
Page 234 - When the horse jumps or plunges, then these aids are also requisite to keep the seat ; but, in an easy, steady pace forward, it is most particularly to be pointed out to a young man, and cannot be too often repeated, that, to become an easy, elegant, or proper horseman, he must learn to ride with comfort and pleasure to his horse as well as to himself...
Page 162 - ... Over the collar; the cheek-piece, parallel with the nose-band, passing through the squares of the collar; to be buckled so as to admit the finger to pass between it and the collar. 3. Bit. — To be placed straight in the horse's mouth, the bar one inch above the lower tusk, but so as to clear the upper tusks. Mares having no tusks, the bit must be placed about two inches above the corner tooth. 4. Bridoon. — Placed over the bit and fastened with the long end of the T (through the squares of...
Page 234 - Whereas, the man who rides with the aid of the proper equilibrium, will, in case of necessity, know when to apply the strength he has retained, with a steady, light hand, and govern every motion according...

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