Adventures in Aidland: The Anthropology of Professionals in International Development

Front Cover
David Mosse
Berghahn Books, Apr 1, 2011 - Social Science - 248 pages

Anthropological interest in new subjects of research and contemporary knowledge practices has turned ethnographic attention to a wide ranging variety of professional fields. Among these the encounter with international development has perhaps been longer and more intimate than any of the others. Anthropologists have drawn critical attention to the interfaces and social effects of development’s discursive regimes but, oddly enough, have paid scant attention to knowledge producers themselves, despite anthropologists being among them. This is the focus of this volume. It concerns the construction and transmission of knowledge about global poverty and its reduction but is equally interested in the social life of development professionals, in the capacity of ideas to mediate relationships, in networks of experts and communities of aid workers, and in the dilemmas of maintaining professional identities. Going well beyond obsolete debates about ‘pure’ and ‘applied’ anthropology, the book examines the transformations that occur as social scientific concepts and practices cross and re-cross the boundary between anthropological and policy making knowledge.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CALCULATING COMPASSION
33
RENDERING SOCIETY TECHNICAL
57
SOCIAL ANALYSIS AS CORPORATE PRODUCT
81
THE WORLD BANKS EXPERTISE
103
WORLD HEALTH AND NEPAL
123
THE SOCIALITY OF INTERNATIONAL AIDAND POLICY CONVERGENCE
139
PAROCHIAL COSMOPOLITANISM ANDTHE POWER OF NOSTALGIA
161
TIDY CONCEPTS MESSY LIVES
177
CODA
199
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
221
INDEX
225
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

David Mosse is Professor of Social Anthropology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has also worked for Oxfam in south India, as a social development adviser for DFID, and as a consultant for various international development agencies. Recent books include Cultivating Development: An ethnography of aid policy and practice (2005); The Aid Effect: Giving and Governing in International development (2005, ed. with D. Lewis); and Development Translators and Brokers (2006, ed. with D. Lewis).

Bibliographic information