The Expedition of Humphry Clinker, Volume 1

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J.Sibbald, and sold, 1793 - Tobacco
 

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Page 179 - ... under any weakness or defect of vision, except about five years ago, when he was complimented with a couple of black eyes by a player, with whom he had quarrelled in his drink. A third wore a laced stocking, and made use of crutches, because, once in his life, he had been laid up with a broken leg, though no man could leap over a stick with more agility. A fourth had contracted...
Page 58 - This, I own, is a subject on which I cannot write with any degree of patience ; for the mob is a monster I never could abide, either in its head, tail, midriff or members ; I detest the whole of it as a mass of ignorance, presumption, malice and brutality...
Page 127 - What I left open fields, producing hay and corn, I now find covered with streets and squares and palaces and churches. I am credibly informed that, in the space of seven years, eleven thousand new houses have been built in one quarter of Westminster, exclusive of what is daily added to other parts of this unwieldy metropolis. Pimlico and Knightsbridge are...
Page 162 - By land, to the island of Cape Breton ? "- -"What ! is Cape Breton an island ? " — " Certainly." — ' Hah ! are you sure of that ? " When I pointed it out on the map, he examined it earnestly with his spectacles ; then taking me in his arms, " My dear C •," cried he, " you always bring us good news. Egad, I'll go directly, and tell the king that Cape Breton is an island.
Page 181 - A certain winking genius, who wore yellow gloves at dinner, had, on his first introduction, taken such offence at S , because he looked and talked, and ate and drank, like any other man, that he spoke contemptuously of his understanding ever after, and never would repeat his visit, until he had exhibited the following proof of his caprice.
Page 57 - ... brokers, and jobbers of every kind; men of low birth and no breeding, have found themselves suddenly translated into a state of affluence, unknown to former ages; and no wonder that their brains should be intoxicated with pride, vanity, and presumption.
Page 130 - What are the amusements at Ranelagh ? One half of the company are following one another's tails, in an eternal circle ; like so many blind asses in an olivemill, where they can neither discourse, distinguish, nor be distinguished ; while the other half are drinking hot water under the denomination of tea, till nine or ten o'clock at night, to keep them awake for the rest of the evening.
Page 61 - Right under the pump-room windows is the King's Bath; a huge cistern, where you see the patients up to their necks in hot water. The ladies wear jackets and petticoats of brown linen, with chip hats, in which they fix their handkerchiefs to wipe the sweat from their faces; but, truly, whether it is owing to the steam that surrounds them, or the heat of the water, or the nature of the dress, or to all these causes together, they look so flushed, and so frightful, that I always turn my eyes another...
Page 180 - A fourth had contracted such an antipathy to the country, that he insisted upon sitting with his back towards the window that looked into the garden ; and when a dish of cauliflower was set upon the table, he snuffed up volatile salts to keep him from fainting ; yet this delicate person was the son of a cottager, born under a hedge, and had many years run wild among asses on a common.
Page 86 - But the madness of the times has made the place too hot for them, and they are now obliged to think of other migrations. Some have already fled to the mountains of Wales, and others have retired to Exeter. Thither, no doubt, they will be followed by the flood of luxury and extravagance, which will drive them...

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