The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600

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Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny, Eleonore Stump, Jan Pinborg
Cambridge University Press, Jul 29, 1988 - Philosophy - 1035 pages
3 Reviews
This 1982 book is a history of the great age of scholastism from Abelard to the rejection of Aristotelianism in the Renaissance, combining the highest standards of medieval scholarship with a respect for the interests and insights of contemporary philosophers, particularly those working in the analytic tradition. The volume follows on chronologically from The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, though it does not continue the histories of Greek and Islamic philosophy but concentrates on the Latin Christian West. Unlike other histories of medieval philosophy that divide the subject matter by individual thinkers, it emphasises the parts of more historical and theological interest. This volume is organised by those topics in which recent philosophy has made the greatest progress.
 

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Contents

ANTHONY KENNY JAN PINBORG
11
Aristotle in the middle ages
43
Aristotles latinus
45
The medieval interpretation of Aristotle
80
The old logic
99
Ancient scholastic logic as the source of medieval scholastic logic
101
Predicables and categories
128
Abelard and the culmination of the old logic
143
The interpretation of Aristotles Physics and the science of motion
521
The effect of the condemnation of 1277
537
The Oxford calculators
540
Infinity and continuity
564
Philosophy of mind and action
593
The potential and the agent intellect
595
Sense intellect and imagination in Albert Thomas and Siger
602
Criticisms of Aristotelian psychology and the AugustinianAristotelian synthesis
623

Logic in the high middle ages semantic theory
159
The origins of the theory of the properties of terms
161
The Oxford and Paris traditions in logic
174
The semantics of terms
188
The semantics of propositions
197
Syncategoremata exponibilia sophismata
211
Insolubilia
246
Speculative grammar
254
Logic in the high middle ages propositions and modalities
271
Topics their development and absorption into consequences
273
Consequences
300
Obligations A From the beginning to the early fourteenth century
315
B Developments in the fourteenth century
335
Modal logic
342
Future contingents
358
Metaphysics and epistemology
383
Essence and existence
385
Universals in the early fourteenth century
411
Faith ideas illumination and experience
440
Intuitive and abstractive cognition
460
Intentions and impositions
479
Demonstrative science
496
Natural philosophy
519
Free will and free choice
629
Thomas Aquinas on human action
642
Ethics
655
The reception and interpretation of Aristotles Ethics
657
Happiness the perfection of man
673
Conscience
687
Natural morality and natural law
705
Politics
721
The reception and interpretation of Aristotles Politics
723
Rights natural rights and the philosophy of law
738
The state of nature and the origin of the state
757
The just war
771
The defeat neglect and revival of scholasticism
785
The eclipse of medieval logic
787
Humanism and the teaching of logic
797
Changes in the approach to language
808
Scholasticism in the seventeenth century
818
Neoscholasticism
838
Biographies
853
Bibliography
893
Index nomimun
979
Index rerum
995
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