Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

Front Cover
Hubert Ashton Holden
1864
 

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Contents

Disturbances in the time of King Richard J Froissart
9
Objections to a public inquiry answered
10
Of Submission to Gods will
11
The Cornish rebels on Blackheath A d 1496 Lord Bacon
12
Of the pursuit of happiness D Hume
13
Honourthe reflection of a mans own actions
14
Letter
15
Love of our countrynot a principle of passion Lord Bolingbroke
16
Comparison between Livy and Polybius
17
Regulation of the passions
18
Rights and responsibilities of the press y Milton
19
Defeat of the Athenians before Syracuse Sir W Ralegh
20
The unseen in art and nature R Hooker
21
Terrorthe ruling passion of the sublime E Burke
22
Dux vita m or tali Jim animus C Salustius
23
A just equipoise of the passions
24
Taxation of houses in Holland unfair Sir IV Temple
25
The spirit of man and the spirit of the world
26
Death of Fiesco W Robertson
27
Original rights of man in civil society E Burke
28
Homage paid to virtue
29
Mary Queen of Scots leaving France W Robertson
30
Xenophon his retreat with the Ten Thousand Lord Bacon
31
Spartan justicean instance of it Spectator
32
3 Domestic happiness the aim of all labour S Johnson
33
Queen Elizabeths speech in the camp of Tilbury D Hume
34
Greek and Roman philosophy
35
Socrates his method of teaching
36
The true character of gentlemen
37
Condemnation of the generals after the battle of Arginusx B C 406 Sir W Ralegh
38
39 Ciceros philosophical skill
39
Louise of Savoy W Robertson
40
Reason when its use begins R Hooker
41
Purity of Parliamentary elections
42
Religion alone determines to right conduct
43
On the writing of history T Gray
44
45 Of Fortune Lord Bacon
45
49 Of qualities immediately agreeable to others D Hume
49
New Carthage
50
51 Juvenal and Horace J Dryden
51
52 Of Truth
52
S3 The consideration of infinity beyond mans powers 54 William third Earl of Pembroke his character Lord Clarendon
54
55 Of Vanity
55
Coriolanus
56
Nature the best guide Spectator
57
The expedition of Charles V against Algiers W Robertson
58
59 Character of Pompey the Great Conyers Middle
59
Perkin Warbecks proclamation Lord Bacon
60
61 The Epicureans J Barrow
61
Studies their use Lord Bacon
62
Of Indolence S Johnsor
63
Destruction of Jerusalem H H Milman
64
Political innovators obtain a ready hearing R Hooker
65
Aspiration after truth G Berkeley
66
Two neverfailing sources of cheerfulness y Addison
67
Norwegian legislation
68
Letter
69
Spiritual truths cannot be adequately expressed
70
Characteristics of true eloquence
71
Description what constitutes its merit
72
Youth the time for imbibing virtuous principles
73
74 Of Translation H Felton
74
75 Remonstrance with levellers Sir J Ckeeke
75
Cicero why not mentioned by Horace and Virgil Conyers Middleton
76
The origin of trade Sir W Temple
77
71 Panegyric of Fox mover of the East India BUI E Burke 78 Regulation of desires
78
79 The lacteal system a proof of a designing Creator W Paley
79
The two Antonines E Gibbon
80
Oliver Cromwell A Cowley
81
Letter from I Casaubon to the President de Thou
82
The end of great but not good men Lord Bacon
83
Travelling merchants in Gaul R Heron
84
The French under Louis VII defeated by the Turks G Lyttelton
85
The possession of children Lord Bacon
86
Aristomenes story of his escape W Mitford Poverty its disadvantages Letter
87
King James I s suspicion of Perkin Warbeck Lord Bacon
88
Socrates
89
Reasoi and the affections Lord Bacon
90
Danger of experimental legislation in an established system of government
91
Grounds of criticism in tragedy J Dryden
92
The elxtensive force of novelty H Grove
93
94 Colonisation as subservient to population W Paley
94
95 Character of M Porcius Cato
95
A letter to Hugh Bethel A Pope
96
Wallers forces routed by Prince Maurice Clarendon
97
Irresolution and its remedy J Addison
98
99 The diity of the historian
99
Philosophy its work A Cowley
100
179 The course of nature
101
ioz London after the battle of Edgehill Lord Clarendon 102 Of Disappointments J Swit
102
The climate of Germany E Gibbon
103
Character of Lord Falkland Lord Clarendon
104
Character of Sir Thomas Coventry Lord Clarendon
105
Letter to Hon H S Conway H Walpole
106
Desire of learning Lord Bacon
107
Sir Humphrey Gilbert his speech against Bell D Hume
108
Subjugation of Britain W Smyth
109
Simultaneous growth of the evil and its remedy W Smyth
110
zn Character of John Hampden Lord Clarendon 112 Romethe occasion of her greatness N Mackiavelli
112
Forceuse of it temporary E Burke
113
Lord Digby revealing himself to Sir John Hothatn Lerd Clarendon
114
Pragmatical meddling with other mens matters R South
115
Oliver Cromwellhis speech to Sir Matthew Hale E Burke
116
Toleration of Christianity under Valerian E Gibbon
117
Political hatred J Addison
118
The Emperor Majorian his zeal in preserving the ancient edifices of Rome E Gibbon
119
English and French Gardens J Addison
120
Objects of human knowledge G Berkeley
121
i2T Gaiety and good humour S Johnson 122 Felicity and industry SirH Wotton
122
Porcius Cato repulsed from the Consulship
123
Character of Justinian E Gibbon
124
Epitaphs S Johnson
125
Universal happinessplan for devising impossible
126
True standard of the arts E Burke
127
Letter
128
Englands crisis
129
Marie Antoinette E Burke 130 Warren Hastingshis appearance on his trial Lord Macaulay
130
Resentment
131
Our natural faculties limited
132
Of debt
133
Human nature by whom vilified J Addison
134
Of the true greatness of kingdoms Lord Bacon
135
The force of custom in regard to a future life J Addison
136
Astronomy
137
Character of Oliver Cromwell Lord Clarendon
138
Benefits of learning
139
How flatterers are to be avoided N Machiatfelli
140
Mans ingratitude W Paley
141
Indifference to outward circumstances Lord Bolingbroke
142
Character of Thomas Cromwell G Burnet
143
What kind of knowledge a student ought to attain I Barrow
144
Ridicule the talent of ungenerous tempers J Addison
145
Letter to the Duke of Grafton Junius
146
The original political state of the Roman Commons T Arnold
147
Latter days of Oliver Cromwell D Hume
148
Agriculture
149
Argument for love of God y Taylor
150
Prospect of death
151
The danger of procrastination A Cowley
152
The virtue of a commander
153
Character of John Hampden Lord Clarendon
154
Character of the Barbarians E Gibbon
155
Sylla apparent inconsistency in his character T Arnold
156
Cicero Conyers Middleton
157
Certain imputations against learning Lord Bacon
158
Cardinal Wolsey Lord Herbert
159
The estimate of an enemy as well as a friend de serves attention y Addison
160
Prospect of the ruins of Rome in the 15th century E Gibbon
161
Nelson R Sout
162
Sertorius Longs Flu arch
163
How to procure contentedness J Taylor
164
Punishment by ex post facto legislation
165
Virtue requires trial and exercise J Milton
166
Visit to the site of the mansion of Cornelia
167
Impiety of Dionysius
168
The battle of Edgehill a d 1642 Lord Clarendon
169
Effects of education upon character D Hume
170
The English Ambassador at the court of the Em peror of Moscovia a d 1583 J Milton
171
Mere assent to moral propositions W Paley
172
Fiescos exhortations to the conspirators W Robertson
173
Letter to Buonamattai y Milton
174
F Cortes W Robertson
175
Talent of ridicule in the possession of an illcondi tioned man y Addison
176
Of anger Lord Bacon
177
The study of the elegiac poets
178
Covenants J Milton
179
Rhetorical blandishments C Burke Belisarius his repulse of the Goths from Rome E Gibbon
180
Actions apart from moral considerations
181
Law against the admission of strangers
182
Moral slavery Lord Clarendon 183 Excess of care S jfoknson
183
Factions Lord Bacon
184
1S4 Contemplation of death SirR Steele 185 Superficial not sound learning inimical to Religion Lord Bacon
185
The cavaliers their claims on Royal favour Lord Macaulay
186
Arguments of the Royalists Lord Macaulay
187
Praise of knowledge Lord Bacon
188
Character
189
The true source of poetry Sir W Temple
190
19a Cicero his want of fortitude Lord Bolingbroke 191 Death of Lorenzo de Medici W Roscoe
191
zgt Of the opinion of necessity 192 Of moral discipline
192
Extravagance SirR Steele 193 Want of earnestness about life
193
Dissemination of falsehood S Johnson
194
195 Character of William Villiers Lord Viscount Grand ison Lord Clarendon
195
Caesars passage of the Rubicon C Merivale
196
Discipline in a regiment how best promoted
197
Sir W Temple his remonstrance with Charles II D Hume
198
Education W Paley
199
The Duke of York and Marshal Turenne Lord Clarendon
200
Sad issue of eminent merit R South
201
Learning insures immortality Lord Bacon
202
MuleyHascen restored to the kingdom of Tunis W Robertson
203
William the Third Lord Macaulay
204
Qualifications of an historian R Ascham
205
Men tern e caelesti demissam traximns arte 336 Our incapacity to discover all things in the world
206
Elizabeth Queen of King Edward IV
207
3067 Of Ambition J Addison 2089 King Charles II his return R South
208
National troubles and personal happiness 341 National characterits source and development
209
The pleasure of study and contemplation Bishop Hall
210
Expectation SirH Wotton
211
The active man SirH Wotton
212
21314 Conspiracy of the Pazzi W Roscoe
213
A letter from Sir William Temple 348 A letter from the Earl of Orford to General Churchill 349 Transformations of language 350 Relation of the Sta...
214
Death of Lorenzo de Medici W Roscoe
215
Lady Jane Grey and Edward H Coleridge
216
Cortes appointed commander by Velasquez W Robertson
217
Introduction to History of England Lord Macaulay
218
Profligacy of politicians in the reign of Charles II Lord Macaulay
219
Cicero C Merivale
220
Charles the Fifth his resignation of his dominions W Robertson
221
Bountifulness of nature I Barrow
222
The battle of Salices a d 377 E Gibbon
223
Perception of the sublime J Rusk
224
Vestiges of the past J A Froude
225
Salutary innovation Lord Brougham
226
London after the battle of the Boyne Lord Macaulay
227
Death of Catherine Queen of Henry VIII D Hume
228
Do as you would be done to J Selden
229
Sir W Ralegh and the king of Aromaia Sir W Ralegh
230
Of Obscurity A Cowley
231
Character of Marcus Porcius Cato of Utica Conyers Middleton
232
Civil war in Scotland Sir W Scott
233
The Druidical worship its partial refinement E Burke
234
Humane conduct of Hannibal to his prisoners T Arnold
235
Dorislaus killed at the Hague Lord Clarendon
236
William III his early life and education Lord Macaulay
237
Popularity not to be sought nor despised Lord Clarendon
238
The arts and sciences O Goldsmith
239
Antiquity of the Jews a great prerogative H Coleridge
240
Queen Elizabeth and the sovereignty of the United Provinces D Hume
241
Norman Conquest extraordinary facility of E Burke
242
Character of Cams Marius Conyers Middleton
243
Constitutions when most to be commended A Sydney
244
Battle of Marston Moor fought July a d 1644 H Coleridge
245
Cromwell and the title of King Lord Clarendon
246
Reflection on the tombs in Westminster Abbey J Addison
247
Fortune mistaken notions concerning her Sir T Browne
248
Constantine the Greatrhis vast prodigality E Gibbon
249
Gradual development of the English Constitution Lord Macaulay
250
Enquiry into the nature of the understanding J Locke
251
National Assembly of France their constraint E Burke
252
Augustus resignation of his usurped power E Gibbon
253
Introduction to the apology for Smectymnus J Milton
254
Henry VIII and the Emperor Charles V W Robertson
255
Orders of both Houses for subscribing money and plate for the defence of the king refused a d 1642 Lord Clarendon
256
Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots G Buchanan
257
The desire of communicating knowledge H Mackenzie
258
Twofold type of character common among men W Paley
267
William the Third coldness of his manners Lord Macaulay
268
Trial of Algernon Sydney a d 1683 D Hume
269
Mischievous effects of unseasonable liberty
270
The reduction of Veii by M Furius Camillus B G Niebuhr
271
Character of the Spanish inquisition W H Prescott
272
Paramount value of good counsellors to princes B Jonson
273
Character of King Charles I H Hallam
274
Operations before the battle of Floddenfield Lord Herbert
275
Prospect of deathpleasure ofto the righteous
276
Preparation for death
277
Eagerness for emigration in America W Robertson
278
Character of an hyperbolical fop by Seneca A Co7uley
279
2802 Devastation of the Carnatic by Hyder AH Khan E Burke
280
A melancholy
281
Sorrow 456 Character of the Emperor Charles V
282
Eloquence how it differs from the other fine arts
283
Christians ought to live as they would
284
The Gonfaloniere di Justicia at Florence H Hallam
285
Charaer of Charles II D Hume
286
Riches are unable to confer real happiness
287
Evanescence of ideas 46s Preface to Endymion
288
2S8 Nature and situation of the castle of Dumbarton G Buchanan 289 An Africans speech B Franklin
289
Warren Hastings brought to the Bar of the House Lord Macaulay
290
Virgilhis F neid and its defects G Niebuhr
291
Letter W Cowper
292
Character of Epaminondas
293
2j3 Advice to those living in bondage to the world 294 Sympathetic revenge a duty E Burke
294
The true test of a good government Junius
295
Deliberations of the seven Magians
296
The wisest men think for themselves
297
The poet and the historian
298
Mans happiness regulated by his own behaviour J Butler 299 Benefits of truthfulness Spectator
299
Advice to Prince Henry Frederick Sir W Ralegh
300
Lord Bacon his demeanour at his impeachment E Burke
301
Effects of usurious transactions in the Carnatic E Burke
302
Prudence cannot always command success Spectator
303
The Earls of Lanrick and Lautherdale Lord Clarendon
304
Justice is slowinjury quick and rapid E Burke
305
Plato his illustrations of moral instruction J Mackintosh
306
Augustus Caesarcharacter of his sovereignty C Meriuale
307
A mercenary war difficult to be sustained E Burke
308
Knowledge increases power Lord Bacon
309
A walk upon the seashore H W Longfellow
310
Cardinal Wolsey his character Lord Herbert
311
Retrospect of life suggestive of humility E Jeffrey
312
Frederic Count of Schomberg Lord Macaulay
313
The Carnatic E Burke
314
Of Selfpraise D Hume
315
Every mans business is no mans T Arnold
316
A Persian law 514 Of Translation
317
Story of Percennius and Vibulenus
318
Francis Henry Duke of Luxemburg
319
Letter to the Marquis of Buckingham
320
A Roman funeral 519 Theodosius the younger
321
Expectation of perfection 521 Society an instrument of happiness
322
Character of Cleon
323
y Addison Lord Clarendon
324
History J Milton
325
A Cowley J Swift
326
Character of Philip of Macedon C Thirlwall
327
Character of Xenophon G Grote
328
Lord Macaulay
329
The hope of the righteous Wisdom of Solomon
330
Definition of
331
Antiquity S Johnson
332
The merit of discovery
333
The desire of excelling
334
Prayer
335
Want of combined action
336
A scientific taste Sir J Hersckel
337
Barrow S Purr J Barrow J Barrow I Barrow Lord Bacon
338
Hume J Hughes S Jehnson Hume
339
y Milton R Ascham Lord Bolingbroke
340
Primitive justice R South
341
The Besieged
342
IV Cow Per E Burke
343
Mustaphas Death
344
Prospect of eternal life T Burnet
345
Dominion founded upon violence E Burke
346
Practice and theory J Harris
347
The Peninsular War W F P Napier
348
The general happiness of mankind G Berkeley
349
The Divine economy G Berkeley
350
The Martyrdom of truth J Milton
351
Difficulty of conjoint action A Helps
352
Plea of not guilty
353
E Gibbon
354
Character of Diocletian E Gibbon 47 France and Americatheir struggle for freedom
355
America not peopled from the southern regions W Robertson 49 Proper constitution of boards 50 Contemplation of misery 51 The earliest poetry of ...
356
A vision
357
E Burke
358
Pirates Lord Bacon 359 Socrates and Aristophanes J Addison
359
E Burke
360
King Charles II L Hutchinson
361
Character of King Lewis XIV D Hume
362
Speech
363
Advantage of treasure in
364
Measure perfecteth all things R Hooker
365
History T Fuller
366
Practical and speculative atheism J Norris
367
Reason and imagination
368
The conduct of the ministry Lord Chatham
369
The pastoral state
370
The battle of EdgehilL a d 1642 Lord Clarendon
371
J Pearson Sir W Temple
372
Flattery R South
373
Parliamentary reform Lord Macaulay
374
Speech of a citizen of Lucca to the people N Machiavelli
375
Treatment of soldiers Lord Brougham
376
Thought W Paley
377
Nicias Plutarch
378
Character
379
Philip de Comines
380
Prudence in the cause of vice R B Sheridan
381
An incident contrasting the Athenian and Lacede monian character SirR Steele
382
Truth and true goodness often disjoined
383
The Indian and bear
384
Equity y Selden
385
Socrates on pleasure and pain Speclator
386
A field of battle described
387
Literature in the seventeenth century
388
Immorality of the old Romans
389
King Henry VII after the battle of Stoke Lord Bacon
390
The Earl of Essex before Reading a d 1643 Lord Clarendon
391
The searcher after truth S T Coleridge
392
William of Normandyhis character E Burke
393
Miltonhis blindness H Hallam
394
S yohnsen T Arnold
395
The Poet the monarch of all sciences Sir P Sidney
396
Character
397
Massacre during the French Revolution
398
Foreign government of Italy
399
Life as a state of probation W Patey
400
Siege of Badajoz a d 1812 W F P Napier
401
Motion for the repeal of the American Stamp Act E Burke
402
The Villa Pliniana on the Lake of Como P B Shelley
403
Repulse of the Tlascalans by Cortes a d 1519 W H Prescott
404
The successive stages of intellectual progress
405
Death of Nicholas di Rienzi A d 1354 E Gibbon
406
Devoted patriotism
407
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation Spectator
408
Political discontents E Burke
409
Moderation in both circumstances J Addison
410
41112 The highest prosperity a forerunner of decay C Thirhvall
411
ChaVles V in the expedition against Algiers W Robertson
413
J J Blunt Cony era Middleon O Goldsmith S Johnson
414
Letter to Mr Nicholls T Gray
415
The origin of mourning apparel
416
41718 Character of Julius Caesar
417
Emulation not to be confined to a narrow sphere
419
The sedatives of anger
420
Canning on the Spanish cause a d 1809 R Soutftey
421
Sir John Moore W F P Napier
422
Lord Raglanhis conduct in the Crimean campaign
423
Enterprising spirit of the Carthaginian government T Arnold
424
Distinct species of oratory Sir W Jones
425
The Sienese and Charles V and Cosmo De Medici W Robertson
426
Death Sir W Ralegh
427
Edwin and his pagan priesthood A d 597 H H Milman
428
Parallel between Lysias and Isaeus Sir W Jones
429
Marshal Neyhis betrayal of the Bourbons Sir W Scott
430
E Gibbon J Butler J Butler
431
Plato and Seneca on the uses of adversity T Hughes
432
Warren Hastings E Burke
433
Preservation of the purity of a languagea great benefit to society J Milton
434
A letter on the qualifications of an historian J Milton
435
Proneness to look into futurity J Addison
436
Excellencies of the Greek and Roman historians H Felton
437
Defeat and death of Valens a d 378 E Gibbon
438
Empire of reason so called E Burke
439
Charles I his escape from Hampton Court Lord Clarendon
440
What constitutes intemperateness J Ruskin
441
Spirit of the English Constitution E Burke
442
The reality of what is truly before
443
Pervading influence of ambition 7 Hughes
444
The English languageits gradual improvement S Johnson
445
The retreat from Moscow
446
Scene in Rasselas S Johnson
447
Description of the Campagna of Rome under even ing light J Ruskin
448
The ocean dried up T Burnet
449
The world a heap of ruins T Burnet
450
Story of Malcolm III king of Scotland Lord Lyttelton
451
Of Agriculture A Coiuley
452
The praise of a country life H Vaughan
453
Qualification of women for rule H Coleridge
454
7 Rusk in Lord Bolingbroke
455
T Gray
456
Addison
457
ThirlwaU Lord Bacon Lord Bacon
458
Middleton
459
E Burke E Irving
460
Hobbes T Gray T Gray
461
E Burke W
464
F Quarles F Quarles
465
G Canning
466
I Barrow D Hume
467
R Steele R Hooker
468
Milton
469
T Arnold
475
Lord Bacon
476
Sir W Ralegh
477
R Hooker
478
N Machiavelli N Machiavelli
479
A Sidney Sir T Overbury
482
S yenyns Sir W Ralegh y Dry den y Milton Sir W Ralegh
483
y Milton W Pitt
486
y Milton y Foster 0 Felltham
487
Sir W Ralegh E Burke
488
Barrow O Felltham Sir F Sidney Sir P Sidney Sir P Sidney
489
N Machiavelli O Felttiam N Machiavelli N Machiavelli
491
R Leighton
493
y Locke IV S Landor
495
O Goldsmith
496
y Taylor R Hooker
497
Lord Bacon
499
y Fox y Dryden R Southwell
500
S T Coleridge
501
Hume
503
IK Stow G Berkeley
504
Lord Bolingbroke
505
R Whately y Fuller
506
Lord Chesterfield W Paley W Paley W Paley
510
Lord Macaulay C y Fox Lord Macaulay
512
E Burke W F P Napier
517
A virtuous old age Sir R Steele
523
P Holland E Burke
524
Cromwell Lord Clarendon
525
The art of government J Milton
526
Heraclitus
527
Ignorance of lifes great business T Arnold
528
Lord Clarendon Lord Clarendon
529
Lord Bacon Lord Macaulay Lord Bacon
530
The lower animals without fellowfeeling
531
Letter
532
The Emperor Julian E Gibbon
533
Intercourse with the great men of old Lord Macaulay
534
Fortune B Jonson
535
E Gibbon y Norris Sir R Steele
536
The disease of talking B Jonson
537
S Knight E Burke C Babhoee E Burke
538
Despotism not the duty of an English Colonial
539
governor E Burke
540
Lord Bacon
541
W Robertson Ulpian Fulwell T Gray J Davison I Barrow A Smith I Barrow D Hume
542

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Page 439 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause; and be silent that you may hear: believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Ca;sar was no less than his.
Page 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
Page 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
Page 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Page 553 - An Analysis of the Exposition of the Creed, written by the Right Rev. Father in God, JOHN PEARSON, DD, late Lord Bishop of Chester. Compiled...
Page 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
Page 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Page 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Page 243 - Now therein of all sciences — I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit — is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.
Page 439 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

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